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  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
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    329

    Default Deep Etching Question

    Hi Everyone,

    I'm hoping somebody can give me some suggestions. I came up with what I thought to be a great concept - the client accepted the pitch...and now I'm not sure how to go about it.

    Basically - I've designed a brochure for a pool company and the cover is going to have a Spot UV on it of water condensation which I'm deriving from the image attached.



    I thought I could play around with the levels and get it to a point where it could be live traced in illustrator so that the actual water droplets were solid areas. But I can't seem to get anywhere because of the transparency of the water.

    Does anyone have any tips on how to optimise this in photoshop for tracing? Or will I just bite the bullet and trace around each droplet with the pen tool!!! aaaahhh.

    Mel

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    Croyders, Melly
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    1,198

    Default

    A bigger image would help - like at least screen size.

    mutters

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Royston Vasey
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    Default

    See here on a way to create the droplets directly in Illustrator.

    As to the creation "of many droplets" of varying sizes and amoebic shapes using the method linked above, create many round drops as multiple copies and then apply the Warp Tool across all of them.

    Just a quick thought.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Royston Vasey
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    Default

    Sorry - reread and less tired, I see now you don't want to capture water droplets as vector illustrations, but to create the outlines of water droplets in registration black (or something like that) in order to emboss and gloss the surface of the stock it's to be printed on - yes?

    In which case, all you need to keep in mind is that water condensation is a purely random and natural pattern, so there's no need to outline what you've got there in the above photo.
    Create the whole pattern in Illustrator and here's one that is very rough - took around 20 minutes and gives you a fairly good target.

    1.



    Start by creating a small cluster of circles in Illustrator.


    2.



    Copy and Rotate.


    3.



    Create more circles within a designated square around the copied cluster to create more random circles.


    4.



    Select all the circles you've created, Group them, Copy, Paste to the side and Rotate by 45.


    5.



    Do the same Copy, Paste, Rotate two more times to create a larger square of circles.


    6.



    Double-click the Warp Tool in your Tool Palette, as circled above in red.


    7.



    Enter the parameters and dimensions of how you want the Warp Brush to behave and click OK.
    This might take a little trial and error to get it just right, and to make sure one shape doesn't warp into another too much.



    8.



    And you can now delicately begin warping your bootiful circles in the subtle ways that water forms when it condenses.


    9.



    When you're done, Ungroup all the blocks of water forms and select random shapes to Copy and Paste in order to fill in the criss-cross gaps left on the intersections of each block of droplets to give the whole cluster a truly random and seamless fill of water drop shapes.

    This was done quickly for illustrative purposes.
    Spend a few hours getting the droplet shapes as random as you can.


    cheers,

    cw

  5. #5

    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Royston Vasey
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    Default

    Oh - and if you need the Registered Black vector to fit the photograph, instead of using the photo, base the artwork on the already random Illustrator artwork, by importing it into Photoshop and running a Filter Effect over the pure Black Illustrator Art, to create something like this:



    I've used a Glass Filter Effect here (in Photoshop), with no Drop Shadow, tweaked it here and there and placed it on a blue Gradient background, yet a Gradient Filter Effect would work far better for your desired effect, to knock out the glassy highlights.

    In other words, another possibility would be to work in reverse.
    Instead of basing the Adobe Illustrator art on the photo, to base the photographic effect on the Adobe Illustrator art.

    Hope this maketh sense.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
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    329

    Default

    Thanks Clockwork!!

    That is a great idea.....I think I may work backwards instead. Thanks so much for the step by step instructions....I'm going to try that now.

    Mel

  7. #7

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    Default

    Show us your final result too Mel.

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