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  1. #1

    Arrow MacBook in Jakarta, grounding question

    Hi,

    I am looking to relocate to Jakarta taking a new 17" MacBook Pro, and I know from being there with an older powerbook that this closed thread grounding issue exists there .... http://forums.mactalk.com.au/24/1012...grounding.html

    In fact the powerbook over there has just failed and I am hoping not to kill a new notebook.

    The electrical socket is a two prong plug only, using a 3 prong plug will only be converted back with a 2 prong travel adaptor.

    Any ideas for a fix? Or should I just use an Imac for design work and get a plastic laptop for web surfing?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    I have done some Apple troubleshooting in various areas in Jakarta, and have noticed a lot of problems in certain suburbs - mostly to do with really crap electrical wiring in entire suburbs and streets.

    Mostly sudden black-outs, followed by massive brown outs, which then go on to electrocute every Mac and PC in an office.

    The solution was to purchase a goodly sized UPS with an alarm and at least 5 to 10 minutes of electrical back up.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClockWork View Post
    I have done some Apple troubleshooting in various areas in Jakarta, and have noticed a lot of problems in certain suburbs - mostly to do with really crap electrical wiring in entire suburbs and streets.

    Mostly sudden black-outs, followed by massive brown outs, which then go on to electrocute every Mac and PC in an office.

    The solution was to purchase a goodly sized UPS with an alarm and at least 5 to 10 minutes of electrical back up.
    I'd have said similar... but been more towards surge protection. With a laptop you don't need the power so much as you need to tame stupid amounts of inconsistent power surges.
     iPhone & iPhone 3GS, Macbook Pro 17" C2D 2.8ghz. iMac alu. 20" C2D 2ghz. iMac 20" CD 2ghz & Cube 450mhz. Website

  4. #4

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    Thanks for that ClockWork, I most definitely will get one for each computer.

    Do you have any idea if this also helps with the zapping? It is significant and like a constant buzz on your fingers if you maintain contact.

    I am wondering if a rubber matt under the notebook/ my feet is a solution. I don't know enough about electricity!

    Lutze would a surge protector powerboard be adequate? I was planning to take them across with me.
    Last edited by twoshoes; 22nd August 2009 at 12:20 PM.

  5. #5

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    Nor do I strangely, as I too am one of those people who is quite happy to use electricity, yet have no idea how it works...

    However, with a good UPS, one only needs one for all computers plugged into it, and the same would go for Lutze's solution, if one were to purchase something like a Belkin Gold Series 8-Way Surge Protector.

    A good UPS has both an audible alarm to alert the User that the electricity has gone off, and acts like a kind of a big battery, to hold something like... 5 minutes of electricity for all computers, thus giving one the chance to save all work and shut everything down.

    A good Surge Protector however, won't store any electricity, yet it will protect all computers connected to it, from the brown-out that inevitably follows when the electricity jolts back on, often sending a surge of way too much electricity that can spike every Mac in the office / room.

    Either way, only one is needed for many Apple Macs / Printers / Fax Machines - or in other words - delicate electronic instruments.

    AddIt: The only problem with a Surge Protector is that although it halts spiking, it cannot control black outs, and having the power yanked out of a Desktop machine is dangerous if it happens again and again, as the Hard Drive will keep "hard stopping" - much like slamming the brakes on a car every time one goes to brake and thus wearing all tires bald very quickly.
    Last edited by ClockWork; 22nd August 2009 at 12:26 PM.

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