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  1. #1

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    Default Help: Convince IT guy to support Mac

    Hi there,

    Started new work recently, and heard from people that the IT guy, for some reason, is 100% anti-Mac. All I want is to plug in the powerbook and able to 1) have access to internet with all installed applications (not just safari), 2) able to access the drive on local network, 3) optional, but able to access to printer.

    I saw the IT guy setting up the work computer of mine and he was doing all the "mapping network drive", think that's easy to do the equivalent. He did say he need my MAC address, and he doesn't know I'm using Mac...yet.

    Can anyone share their stories on convincing the IT guys to support Mac?

  2. #2

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    I would suggest telling your boss that any IT guy/dept. worth his/their salt would suppport every OS (within reason).

    However as it is a new workplace that might not be the best idea
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  3. #3

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    just give him the MAC address, he cant possibly tell its an OSX machine by a MAC address.

    If its for work reasons then there isn't any reason for him not to give you access regardless of the platform.... If he refuses to, tell your boss.

    I still don't get why IT people are so anti mac, however when they actually try one they love em.

    Wally

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wally View Post
    just give him the MAC address, he cant possibly tell its an OSX machine by a MAC address.

    If its for work reasons then there isn't any reason for him not to give you access regardless of the platform.... If he refuses to, tell your boss.

    I still don't get why IT people are so anti mac, however when they actually try one they love em.

    Wally
    Its normally the people that have never even used one.
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  5. #5

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    Simple solution. Setup up a fresh install of Windows in a VM, go full screen and he won't know the difference, he'll think its Windows running on a mac piece of hardware and will be happy.

    I work at a large number of really big corporates (top 200 companies - most with more than 1000 SAP users). Each customer I spend time at I setup a separate VM for them so the network settings are unique for that customer and so I don't have to change the network settings each time I visit a different customer. When I walk onsite I don't bother telling the network guy its running OSX, I just say I run Mac hardware because I like the reliability of the hardware and give them a fresh VM to install whatever anti-virus software they want and change the exchange settings to their personal preference.

    If they ever ask me whether i run OSX I say yes, and then show them I run the VM's separate for each customer. Its easy to justify simply from the perspective of not wanting information for multiple companies in competition to each other on the same machine without some method of separating the actual configuration and security information. I normally say to them "Would you be happy if I went to XYZ, had your exchange and network settings on my machine and gave them domain admin over my machine?"

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wally View Post
    just give him the MAC address, he cant possibly tell its an OSX machine by a MAC address.
    The first three groups of hex in a MAC address is registered the rest is more or less sequential.

    What that means is that is is possible to know the manufacturer of a network card (or computer) by it's MAC address. (I know this for a fact because I use it to identify computers on the network at work)

    IEEE Registration Authority - IEEE OUI and Company_id Assignments

    Anyway....sounds like this IT guy wouldn't know about that so just provide him with the MAC address of your computer and you should be off and running.

    As for convincing him about OS X, don't. He's made his mind up about that already so what you need to do is go over his head. Get your boss or someone to vouch for you...state a business case as to why you need a Mac and that you take whatever support issues come with that. If he gets told to let you on the network he has no comeback.
    This opinion intentionally left blank.

  7. #7

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    I rather respect an I.T. person that has at least used a mac for a good period, and then say "nar it's not my thing". As opposed to being a typical PC user.. Fuck me dead it angers me, and I can say that, since I WAS one of them pricks..

    I mean nowadays, you will find that Mac techies at least know Windows enough to support it, same goes for switchers (obviously). You'll very very rarely find PC-orientated technicians knowing OSX or experienced it. I agree that Windows isn't for everyone, and nor is OSX.. To each their own.. but to read up about pricks that are anti-mac because they're anti-mac. it's unprofessional! *senseless rant over*

    Nevertheless... good luck with that douche, and have fun at your new workplace. Here's hoping they'll progress more technologically..

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by cmrn View Post
    I would suggest telling your boss that any IT guy/dept. worth his/their salt would suppport every OS (within reason).
    Exactly.

    If you were paying 30% (or some other number) more for your IT than needed to, how would you know?

    Do you really want an employee directing your future purchasing etc. when they don't investigate all the options?
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  9. #9

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    I once had upper management who refused to read things written in black - everything had to be handwritten in blue. I tried to convince them that there was no significant difference to them, that I was happy to buy my own black pens and replace my own ink cartridges, and heck - they might even find the black ink easier on their eyes!
    All my friends down at the black-ink shops agreed with me, and had hundreds of great anecdotes and research papers about the benefits of black ink

    But no matter how hard I tried to convince my work - they wouldn't budge on their outdated, ridiculous blue-ink notions.

    One day, I cracked it. I stormed into my boss's office and said "This is ridiculous! Any business worth their salt will read things in both blue AND black ink, even red! I mean really - you haven't even tried!" I then presented him with the most powerful and self-evident selection of anecdotes and papers about black ink.

    My boss took it all in, nodded, smiled, and said "Suck it up, Princess - I like blue." Then he signed my pay-cheque. In blue.
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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wally View Post
    I still don't get why IT people are so anti mac
    The more arcane knowledge needed and the more effort required to keep systems running then the more job security you have.

    Quote Originally Posted by gizo View Post
    I once had upper management who refused to read things written in black - everything had to be handwritten in blue.
    You should have followed his request to use a blue pen - and used blue paper as well.
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  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by gizo View Post
    I once had upper management who refused to read things written in black - everything had to be handwritten in blue. I tried to convince them that there was no significant difference to them, that I was happy to buy my own black pens and replace my own ink cartridges, and heck - they might even find the black ink easier on their eyes!
    All my friends down at the black-ink shops agreed with me, and had hundreds of great anecdotes and research papers about the benefits of black ink

    But no matter how hard I tried to convince my work - they wouldn't budge on their outdated, ridiculous blue-ink notions.

    One day, I cracked it. I stormed into my boss's office and said "This is ridiculous! Any business worth their salt will read things in both blue AND black ink, even red! I mean really - you haven't even tried!" I then presented him with the most powerful and self-evident selection of anecdotes and papers about black ink.

    My boss took it all in, nodded, smiled, and said "Suck it up, Princess - I like blue." Then he signed my pay-cheque. In blue.
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  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by gizo View Post
    I once had upper management who refused to read things written in black - everything had to be handwritten in blue. I tried to convince them that there was no significant difference to them, that I was happy to buy my own black pens and replace my own ink cartridges, and heck - they might even find the black ink easier on their eyes!
    All my friends down at the black-ink shops agreed with me, and had hundreds of great anecdotes and research papers about the benefits of black ink

    But no matter how hard I tried to convince my work - they wouldn't budge on their outdated, ridiculous blue-ink notions.

    One day, I cracked it. I stormed into my boss's office and said "This is ridiculous! Any business worth their salt will read things in both blue AND black ink, even red! I mean really - you haven't even tried!" I then presented him with the most powerful and self-evident selection of anecdotes and papers about black ink.

    My boss took it all in, nodded, smiled, and said "Suck it up, Princess - I like blue." Then he signed my pay-cheque. In blue.
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  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wally View Post
    just give him the MAC address, he cant possibly tell its an OSX machine by a MAC address.
    Actually YOU can. Some of the numbers in the MAC address are reserved for vendor codes. So you can tell from the MAC address which vendor produced the equipment. Check out one of the lookup tools.

    As found here.

  14. #14

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    sorry, just dig-up an old thread.

    i have not own an intel mac, so it might sound foolish.

    if i create a partition with XP, boot from bootcamp, let the IT guy to do his stuff to arrange internet/printer/network drive access. once he's gone, can i access to internet/printer/network drive with the mac partition?

  15. #15

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    No, its a totally different system and set of settings. You can however copy down the settings are retype them into MacOS.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by purana View Post
    Actually YOU can. Some of the numbers in the MAC address are reserved for vendor codes. So you can tell from the MAC address which vendor produced the equipment. Check out one of the lookup tools.

    As found here.
    Until you change the MAC to DE:AD:BE:EF:CA:FE (I never can remember how long a MAC is...)

  17. #17

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    At my workplace we deal with all variations, we supply labs and work issue computers consisting of G4s and up..

    But we've had people come in with UBuntu, XP, 2000, Vista.. Provide them with what they're after you've got a happy customer.

    How hard can it be??

    The Ubuntu laptop was cool, was a brand new eePC.. :P
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  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by vortex_ View Post
    until you change the mac to de:ad:be:ef:ca:fe (i never can remember how long a mac is...)
    CA:FE:BA:BE:00

    ED: What is with MacTalk stripping my caps from this post?

  19. #19

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    Depending on the company they may have an SOE (Standard Operating Environment) that requires Windows running on authorised equipment. If this is the case, your best outcome is that they let you use your Mac, but you're on your own if you have issues.

    Try an get as many settings from him as you can, ie the SMB/CIFS share names, the mail server settings, calendar settings etc. If they are an MS shop then they are probably running Exchange, or if a smaller organisation they may still be running Novell. No matter what there is software to get up and going - you just need the settings to let it work.

    The main thing the company (and your boss) will be looking for is that you can take part on an even playing field with other staff - they should not have to worry whether your email can or can't see Microsoft's crappy MIME encoded emails, or that your calendar accepts and shares free/busy info properly. They expect it to just work.

    If they don't have an SOE, then you'll get support for (a) whatever the IT guy is paid to support, and/or (b) whatever the IT guy wants to support.

    If you have a single OS bigot in the IT department (whether it be for Mac, Windows, Linux or any other OS) - unless there is a management decision to force them to support other hardware they won't do it.

    In this day & age though, most companies should be looking at ways to open their networks securely for guests & contractors, but this requires a certain amount of progressive thinking and some good work by vendors and resellers to ensure the right solution is in place. Once their network is open to guests, a certain amount of awareness of other OS's is needed.

    Good luck!

    Regards,
    Shane.

  20. #20
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    Basically what scritch has said is correct. Go guerilla.

    I work at a large (over 40k employee) company which uses Windows XP as the SOE. I have my MBP plugged into an external display (which I had to buy myself) and do everything I need to do with it, except for HR stuff like timesheets, holidays etc, as they require IE to work correctly (SAP is shit). There is a PC on my desk with a third display for that stuff, which I rarely use.

    The key to getting this to work, is that if anyone asks, you support yourself. If you company is small enough that it only has one IT guy, just tell him that you're happy to support yourself, and that you just need from him a list of things you need to make things work.

    If it's an Exchange shop, ask him nicely to enable IMAP support, and GAL access via LDAP, etc. Ask for proxy server config, if they don't provide NAT straight to the 'net. Stuff like that.

    Once you're set up, you'll be less of a burden than the Windows users. He'll know that if you have problems you'll only come to him if it's a server side issue, and that he doesn't need to worry that you'll spread Windows viruses (do get antivirus installed however, to ensure you don't spread macro viruses, and to comply with any policy in place).

    At my company there is a large number (maybe 5% user base) of people running Mac OS X. We all run it secretly and just 'make do'. Causing a fuss would get us nowhere, and might in fact spark a corporate crack-down on Macs, forcing us to use PCs. Which would not be cool.
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