Welcome to MacTalk Australia

the largest Australian community for Apple discussions and topics

Join the discussions, Register Now!
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27
  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    36

    Default Upgrade Dilemma - PowerMac or MacPro

    Hi

    Last week my G4 1.0Ghz MDD died (Power supply I think) and while tinkering inside to get the old PSU out, the (fully loaded) optical drive cage slipped off the heatsink and on to the motherboard leaving a nice 20mm scratch cutting through those gold wire things.

    the CPU is now at the workshop getting a new PSU but I suspect my mishap with the motherboard may have been the nail in the coffin and a sign to upgrade.

    I'm looking at the G5's and contemplating a used, high spec pre-intel but at the same time I need the newest Adobe Creative Suite and from what I've researched it was developed for Intel Macs and won't run as smooth on the PowerMac. Any truth to this?

    I'd love a brand new MacPro but my budget won't allow it. The pre-intel macs can be had for very cheap. Main use will be 2D design, photography and possible audio recording/editing.

    Any advice is greatly appreciated.

  2. #2

    Default

    CS3 works fine on PowerPC Macs
    If you can't afford a Mac Pro, take a look at the 24" iMac, you can get them for an excellent price off the Apple refurbished website.

    $1850 will get you a 24" iMac and then buy 4GB of RAM for $125 from any PC store and you'll have a very powerful computer that will handle everything it seems like you're doing.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Paddington, NSW
    Posts
    1,390

    Default

    I would try your best to get a MacPro (even if it exceeds your budget). Otherwise try and buy a high spec G5, yet it won't last you as long (in terms of future software system requirements, upgrades and the like).

    I just checked Adobe's website and saw nothing about optimisation for Intel processors. (Can't believe G4's are still supported!)

    What's your budget, by the way, maybe I can try and find something on the cheap.
    Support MacTalk by shopping at the Apple Online store via this link!
    MacBook Pro 15" UniBody: i7 2.2GHz|16GB|1TB HDD + 128GB SSD

  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    3,660

    Default

    You are absolutely blowing your own toes off by purchasing pre-intel.
    I am the tech savvy at-risk youth.

  5. #5

    Default

    Go the Intel, as good as those Power PC's were, the party is over.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Thanks guys. Well Ideally $2k for the CPU but could stretch that if it included a 20"+ flat screen.

    I may be prepared to spend big on the CPU and wait a while to get the latest and greatest apps but preferrably not. Just realised I'll probably need MS Office too . There's a few things to consider but I'm trying to keep an open mind

    I love the iMac and it's very tempting but I may need the extra flexibility down the track. Planning to get, at the very least 5 years heavy use out of the next one so I'll stick to desktops.
    Power Mac G4 1.0 GHz MDD Power Mac G5 1.8 GHz iMac 2.93 24" iPhone 4

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    36

    Default

    haha! Tell us what you really think Phase & titan44. Very persuasive!
    Power Mac G4 1.0 GHz MDD Power Mac G5 1.8 GHz iMac 2.93 24" iPhone 4

  8. #8

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    3,660

    Default

    Perhaps look at the first Gen Mac Pro 2.66 series, second hand even.

    If you're looking for 5 freaking years you can't afford anything less.
    I am the tech savvy at-risk youth.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Tokyo & Melbourne
    Posts
    1,532

    Default

    You could consider a four core 2008 Mac Pro or a 2006 Mac Pro.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    36

    Default

    5 freakin years, i know but my G3 (1997-2002) and G4 (2002-2008) went the distance plus a few burners and HDD's.
    Power Mac G4 1.0 GHz MDD Power Mac G5 1.8 GHz iMac 2.93 24" iPhone 4

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Kalgoorlie, Western Australia
    Posts
    359

    Default

    what's wrong with a top spec iMac?

  12. #12

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Inside your head
    Posts
    6,557

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Julz View Post
    I love the iMac and it's very tempting but I may need the extra flexibility down the track. Planning to get, at the very least 5 years heavy use out of the next one so I'll stick to desktops.
    No point. Seriously. No point at all. At least by 'desktops' you're referring to towers, then yes, definitely no point, not for your needs. Considering what you've said you want to do with it, your best choice from current-model machines is a 24-inch iMac, most likely the 2.8 GHz model.

    "But I need slots!"

    No you don't. Two monitors is enough for just about everyone, storage space is better off in an external case (so is a DVD burner, for that matter). Audio interfaces are actually better off in a FireWire pod than stuck inside a PCI-E slot. Unless you're doing heavy 3D rendering, wanting to run six 30-inch screens or setting up a heavy-duty server, then a Mac Pro is overkill.

    "What if I want to upgrade the CPU later?"

    Not feasible with an Intel machine (or PowerMac G5 for that matter) -- except for the Mac Mini, which has its odd-man-out CPU in a socket, and the socketed Xeons in the Mac Pro, everything else is soldered to the board. And adding a Xeon to a single-processor'd Mac Pro isn't all that cost effective anyway, even for two year old first gen models.

    Besides, with Intel technology throughout, the CPU and its subsystems are designed to work best with each other. It makes more sense to retire (or hand it down) a Mac once it has reached two years and get a brand new one, because then you get everything new and much faster.

    Then there is the power consumption issue. Unless you like living in a sweatbox and think nothing of a $300 jump to your quarterly electricity bill, the Mac Pro is incredibly greedy -- 350 watts consumption just idling, 1.5 kilowatts or more at full bore. The iMac by comparison is 80-ish to 300 watts, which is only just a bit more than your old, now-deceased G4 tower used to gobble.

    "Will it last five years?"

    Apart from the now-traditionally-mediocre build quality that afflicts everything that comes out of China -- which includes Apple's products -- yes. Provided nothing breaks (which is unlikely, something is virtually guaranteed to break or die in today's Macs once it hits twelve months) then it should still be usable in five years. But consider this: technology is moving faster than ever before, especially with Intel based technology. In two years, we have gone from 1.5 GHz or so to 3 GHz CPU clockspeed. GPU speeds have tripled. Front-side-bus speed has more than tripled. Today's Intel Mac is, on average, more than twice as fast as one from two years ago, because everything is running faster, not just because of a gruntier CPU.

    If you extrapolate the jumps in performance over the next five years, your 2.8 GHz iMac will only be running at one twentieth of the speed of a new 2012-model Mac.

    So. Forget your quest for a tower. Today's desktop Mac is the iMac. It is more than powerful enough for your needs, and by getting the 24-inch model, you get a true 24-bit, 16.7-million-colours LCD screen, which will be crucial if you want to do photography or design work or anything which requires colour-critical accuracy. I'd also look at investing the $100 ish for a Spyder2 screen calibrator, because no LCD (except a $7,000 Eizo ColorEdge) can display accurate colour without tweaking.

  13. #13

    Default

    Another vote for a 24" iMac. Brilliant machine and very, very quick. Certainly quick enough even for very demanding print or screen design work in CS3.

  14. #14

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    189

    Default

    If you are a professional have you thought about a leasing arrangement. It will help you get the best you can afford with the added benefit of being able to upgrade at regular intervals.

  15. #15

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Melbourne Metro
    Posts
    1,231

    Default

    hey mate,
    i have a previous generation 2.8ghz 24" imac with 4Gb ram. Its faster than my friends late 2005 dual 2.0ghz Powermac G5 with 3gb ram. I dont think you can possibly go wrong with a high spec imac. But if your doing photography go for a 24bit screen.
    good luck
    Successful Trades With: Slimey, ryano, vivid2, Byrd

    2.8Ghz Core 2 Duo, 500Gb, 4Gb RAM 24" iMac (Aluminium)

    2.4Ghz Core 2 Duo, 500Gb, 4Gb RAM 13" MacBook (Aluminium)

  16. #16

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    3,660

    Default

    I still stand by the Mac Pro as the option for you.

    It allows you to start small(ish) with your requirements, say 1 drive and a backup / scratch disk, and maybe 2 Gb of RAM.

    As you need to, you can expand this with extra drives for media on one and applications or a bootcamp drive for gaming or what have you, without slowing down your single disk like you would on an iMac. Also, you can take the beast to 32Gb of RAM over the next 5 years. Otherwise you're limited to 4Gb with the iMac. Permanently.

    The processing power is incredible, and for dvd ripping or Lightroom work (or any multi-threaded app), you can take advantage of all 8 cores to demolish wait times.

    Pick and choose monitors as you need to, and if in 2 years a new technology emerges for them, or overall size increases, you're not limited to the built in display (even if you choose not to use it).

    Not to mention, if you're out of your warranty period and your screen dies, you throw away a perfectly good computer. If your Logic board fails, you throw away a perfectly good 24" monitor. The conundrum of the all in one.

    It's a nice pie in the sky ideal that the iMac is the be all and end all Desktop, but unfortunately it is a consumer machine, built for basic work, and under load can disappoint.

    If I can make it struggle now with todays apps and file sizes, I shudder to think what it will be like in even 2 years time.
    I am the tech savvy at-risk youth.

  17. #17

    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Damn, I didn't realise the jump in power consumption would be that dramatic. I'm sure my G4 with 3 internal ATA's spinning the whole time and fully loaded slots chewed more than normal and probably helped kill the PSU.

    The lease option is something I'll seriously consider too. Might be the right choice as I'm now in 2 minds. I have to weigh up the pros and cons.

    Most importantly, for Pr0n on the iMac 24"

  18. #18

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    33

    Default

    I run a studio with G5s - 2.7 6Gb, 24" Dells, Pantone EyeOne, etc.
    Perfect for CS2 and CS3 never complains.
    We get a lot of great (and I mean really good) work done - and quickly - no size queens here.

    It would be nice to have the latest things but see where that gets us if its the only end of any means.
    We don't drive a BMW X5 nor a Kluger. We walk when we can and smell the roses.

    The latest and greatest is fine when only when you can justify it.
    In the end if it's a tool and not your lover - a hammer is s hammer is a hammer.

    Get the best of what you can use and need for what you can afford. Listen to their advice and weigh up the consequences of choice.

    Cheers

  19. #19

    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    4,895

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brains View Post
    Then there is the power consumption issue. Unless you like living in a sweatbox and think nothing of a $300 jump to your quarterly electricity bill, the Mac Pro is incredibly greedy -- 350 watts consumption just idling, 1.5 kilowatts or more at full bore. The iMac by comparison is 80-ish to 300 watts, which is only just a bit more than your old, now-deceased G4 tower used to gobble.
    Brains, I think you might be exaggerating somewhat! 1500 Watts, OR MORE? Nice try! The PSU is rated at 980W from memory, so it can't go over that even in theory, let alone practice. You'll never get anywhere near that unless you have a graphics card in every slot, and you're doing some ridiculous multi-threaded rendering or something that's actually pumping every CPU and GPU at full bore.
    "The need is not for, say, half a million -inch drill bits. The need is that there are ten million -inch holes that need to be drilled." - Robert Noyce
    www.nickforge.com

  20. #20

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Warwick, Australia
    Posts
    832

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brains View Post
    So. Forget your quest for a tower. Today's desktop Mac is the iMac. It is more than powerful enough for your needs, and by getting the 24-inch model, you get a true 24-bit, 16.7-million-colours LCD screen, which will be crucial if you want to do photography or design work or anything which requires colour-critical accuracy. I'd also look at investing the $100 ish for a Spyder2 screen calibrator, because no LCD (except a $7,000 Eizo ColorEdge) can display accurate colour without tweaking.
    Unless you want 5gig or more Ram! But now I am just picking!

    But you are right.

    I think unless you require RAID or the power of the Xeon arcutecture the 24" iMac (or even a high spec 20") will be a lot better then any G5.

    If you can afford the Mac Pro go for it, but if money is a issue go a iMac. You will not be unhappy either way but with a G5 you will always feel cheated if buying now.

    And I do feel that G5's are more prone to blow up as well with heat issues.
    Macs:
    iPhone 5s 64Gb, iPod 60Gig

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •