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  1. #21

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    Maybe Currawong or Kuma can tell us if you're still fingerprinted as a foreigner living in Japan.

    I know I was when I arrived in 97, but I believe the 'Koreans' living in Japan successfully challenged it in court and it was overturned sometime a few years ago. I'm pretty sure it was before Sep 11, so I'm taking a punt that it's back in now?

    I remember baulking at suddenly being asked to give fingerprints too. It's so strongly engrained, from TV, that only criminals are required to give up their fingerprints. To the degree that I rolled my fingers like I thought I'd seen in the movies, and they said NO! without telling me what was wrong. So I did it again, and they said NO! And I did it again like I'd seen the crims do on TV. In the end, a bureaucrat had to dirty his own fingers to show me how they wanted me to do it.

    A small victory, but a victory nonetheless.
    .
    Times are bad. Children no longer obey their parents, and everyone is writing a book.

    - Cicero (106BC-43BC)

  2. #22

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    Those jumping up and down with indignation that the US openly collects your fingerprints, need to reflect on the fact that the US and Australia can now exchange a whole swathe of information about you, including your fingerprints, without your permission or knowledge. There have been some significant changes with the new Free Trade Agreement, as well as with enhanced border security.
    It's better to burn out than it is to rust.

  3. #23

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    Isn't that why they are jumping up and down?

    Afaik the problem is that us aussies don't have any rights. Whereas american's rights are stated in the us constitution, we have nothing of the sort. Our rights kinda exist by what government aren't allowed to do.
    MacBook Pro | 2.26 GHz, 4 GB RAM, 500 GB HD

  4. #24

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    Jul 2005
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    Castlemaine area.
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    If the US require people to be fingerprinted then they'll just decrease their tourist industry (not that they'll care).

    Sort of sucks to be required to do this for work though.

    *crosses the grand canyon, shuttle launch and motorcycle tour off the potential tourist list for next hols... might have to look at that ride an enfield across the himalayas thing*
    iPad Mini 4 128Gb 4G | iPhone 6 64GB | MacBook Pro 13" i5 2.4GHz Retina | Mac Mini i5 | Apple TV 3 |

  5. #25

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    Jun 2004
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    You know, if you wear aluminium foil hats, they can't read your thoughts either.

    What difference does it make? It's a fingerprint... it's not like they took a photo of you and captured your soul... did they?
    ...because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Geoff3DMN View Post
    If the US require people to be fingerprinted then they'll just decrease their tourist industry (not that they'll care).
    Donesn't appear to be the case: http://tinet.ita.doc.gov/tinews/arch.../20070808.html.
    The US has been taking tourists' fingerprints since January 5, 2004.
    It's better to burn out than it is to rust.

  7. #27

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    Feb 2005
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    Langwarrin Vic
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottgrot View Post
    Really?? Wow.

    Did you know you needed to be fingerprinted? Or did you have to go to an "interview" where you were subtley fingerprinted and told that it was for border security and that everybody has it done and that it really is no big deal anyway and that what is all the fuss about anyhow? It just takes seconds. And have a fluffy little cartoon repeating itself on the big widescreen television telling you how simple a process it really is.
    Back in 1975 the interview process was carried out at the High Commission in Ottawa. What did I do? (Electrical Engineer, Computer Specialist). Where had I lived in Canada (background check etc), Health check (Medicals by our doctor) and fingerprints the old fashioned way (Inked by the RCMP and criminal backgroud check).

    Quote Originally Posted by scottgrot View Post
    But yeah, I'm coming down off my perch. Again. Re-thinking it all. Asking myself again, what's it all about? Again.
    Yes you might have a criminal record or be wanted by Interpol or or or or...

    Quote Originally Posted by scottgrot View Post
    It was amusing last time we were in the U.S. The facial recognition software didn't recognise one of my collegues, so she got majorly held up at border security. And we all had visa's with numbers that none of the guards recognised. So they were all calling over their mates and checking it out.
    I worked with a guy in Canada at BNR who had lectured one summer at a university in Cuba and each time he went through the US/Canada border they pulled him aside to double check him as he was on their watch list. They were much more paranoid about Cuba back then. Hell you couldn't get a really good cigar in the US then!
    Regards,
    John
    MacBook Pro 15", iMac G5, G4 Cube 1.2GHz, B&W G3, 7500 ...

  8. #28

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    was going to say, just fly to canada and sneak across the border :P

  9. #29

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    Sep 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeddie2001 View Post
    Innocent until proven guilty... we to fingerprint INNOCENT citizens.
    Sadly today it seems to be more like guilty until proven innocent.

    I'm in the US at the moment and went through it all...I've had worse, but it is over the top - and I believe it's just an excuse to get as much data as they can from you. (I would question if it is all needed.)
    http://samuelclarke.com
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  10. #30

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    May 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottgrot View Post
    I am pretty pissed. Mostly annoyed with myself that I did not walk out of the building when I had the chance.

    There comes a point when you compromise and compromise and compromise your values and beliefs and things that once meant alot to you.

    What do you do?
    You could have refused to give your prints but you certainly wouldn't have been performing in the US.

    Each class of visa whether tourist, temporary resident - such as a student visa - or a migrant visa all have different "character" requirements. I was in the US for the month of July and they took both index finger prints and a head shot - they already had all of this info as 12 years ago I used to be a resident for 8 years. To refuse them would certainly mean the cancellation of any existing visa (at the border) and the refusal of any future visas because for that type of visa it is a "requirement". The Aussies are no different - I was a visa nazi data entry monkey for the Aussies in LA and if you had any doubts about an applicants character or the intention of their visit, you could essentially ask for all sorts of proof that they were genuine, for example, as a tourist. Bank statements to see if they had access to funds, return or ongoing tickets, whatever it took to convince you that they met the requirement. Temporary residents have to do medicals - we don't want an outbreak of TB in Australia do we? Or someone getting in the country just to use the health system which is probably more generous than where they're from.

    They probably used your prints to make sure you hadn't commited any major crimes here in Oz - before they give you the visa. As the good Dr House says, "People lie". Not specifically you, or in this instance, but there's a minority out there that screw it up for the rest of us.
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  11. #31

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    When i applied for a residents visa here in Aus, i had to undergo fingerprinting here, in the UK, and in HK (where i grew up) i had to get police reports from them also, as well as chest X rays, character references, and much more. The whole thing cost me a few thousand pounds, plus the fee to fly here, to NZ for the visa to be issued, and back again. Fucking unreal. Oh, and DIMIA refused to issue me a bridging visa while all this was happening so i could stay here - with my Australian born Daughter (who was a citizen).

    So count yourself lucky
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