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  1. #1

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    Default Help: Two Dead PowerBooks

    Hi All,

    As recently bragged about, I have bought a Powerbook 2400: http://forums.mactalk.com.au/showthread.php?t=30169

    Problem:

    I tried to replace the hard drive wth a Compact Flash IDE adapter and the machine died - just a glowing green light.

    So throwing good money after bad, I ordered a second unit. The second unit is the same as the first, but with a 320Mhz G3 processor and 112MB RAM.

    You would think I had learnt my lesson BUT NO. I replaced the hard drive with another Comact Flash IDE adapter - and now the second 2400 has died - exhibiting the same symptoms.

    I have tried re-installing the orginal hard drives - and have basically pulled the PBs to pieces and re-assembled - with no luck

    I have also followed the instructions at the following site: http://sarofax.com/mac2400/power_reset_by_sydney_ho.htm

    Is there anyone out there who could possibly fix these - or should I just box them up and sell on ebay as dead

    Any suggestions - I really wanted one of these babies souped up for Uni, but I have spent enough time on them.
    Mac Mini (i5 2.5 GHz) & 24" Apple LED CD; Mac Classic; iPad (3G 64GB); iPhone 3G

  2. #2

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    Default

    Just a guess, but have you installed them correctly? I.e cables the right way around and fully/firmly plugged in?

    - Jeremy
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  3. #3

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    Default

    soooo...what happens when you put the original hard drives back in?
    This opinion intentionally left blank.

  4. #4

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    Default

    Did you try and replace the HDD with a modern drive? AFAIK the older drive controllers can't handle certain incarnations of the modern ATA spec. There was some info about this issue on lowendmac.com - I'd check that site out if you are using/modding a vintage mac.
    "The need is not for, say, half a million -inch drill bits. The need is that there are ten million -inch holes that need to be drilled." - Robert Noyce
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  5. #5

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    Default

    I was trying to install a Compact Flash Card IDE adapter which should be ok according to LowEndMac. See http://lowendmac.com/reviews/07/flash.html

    This has worked nicely with my PowerBook 3400 but not the 2400 it would seem.

    The original hard drives are back in the units and all that happens now when you power up is a slight click - no chime
    Mac Mini (i5 2.5 GHz) & 24" Apple LED CD; Mac Classic; iPad (3G 64GB); iPhone 3G

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by jubilantjeremy View Post
    Just a guess, but have you installed them correctly? I.e cables the right way around and fully/firmly plugged in?

    - Jeremy
    Have done - but I can't even get the PB to chime on startup now
    Mac Mini (i5 2.5 GHz) & 24" Apple LED CD; Mac Classic; iPad (3G 64GB); iPhone 3G

  7. #7

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by forgie View Post
    Did you try and replace the HDD with a modern drive? AFAIK the older drive controllers can't handle certain incarnations of the modern ATA spec. There was some info about this issue on lowendmac.com - I'd check that site out if you are using/modding a vintage mac.
    I'm pretty sure thats only for large (over 120GB) drives...i have a modern HD (30GB Hitachi Travelstar from 2004) in my 1400, and it works great.
    Good. Fast. Cheap. Pick two...

  8. #8

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    the question is, WHY use CF in a crappy machine like that?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Linux_insidev2 View Post
    the question is, WHY use CF in a crappy machine like that?
    I thought you'd know the importance of the Powerbook 2400! They're cool little 'books, and well worth repairing. In fact, any Mac is worth repairing IMO!

    macrob and I are onto it. Armed with a multimeter, soldering iron and a pile of SMT fuses

    JB

  10. #10

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    Powerbook 2400: A True Tokyo Rose

    TOKYO -- An old Apple laptop that sold poorly when it was released in Japan a few years ago has subsequently achieved cult status, with fans paying up to $25,000 to upgrade and decorate their aging machines.

    Launched in 1997, the PowerBook 2400 was a small, light sub-notebook designed especially for the Japanese market, although later it was also sold in the United States.

    At the time, the 2400 was praised for its power, size and good looks. It was small - it weighed only 4.4 pounds - but performed like larger, full-sized laptops weighing twice as much. And it looked good -- fans liked its smooth, black curves. But the machine cost $3,500, which put off a lot of Japanese buyers.

    Since then, the 2400 has become a hot ticket. Used machines, if they can be found, go for more than $1,000. Even broken machines command more than $800. In the United States, they sell for about $200 to $300.

    Fans go to great lengths to upgrade their machines with more memory and newer processors. And they will spend a small fortune decorating their laptops with colored or transparent cases, or custom "Yuzen" designs, a style used in traditional Japanese kimonos.

    "The 2400 people are crazy," said Nobuyuki Hayashi, a freelance writer for Japanese Mac magazines. "Japanese people tend to extend the life of their machines because they love them so much. Instead of buying a new machine, they want to extend the life of their old machine. And people spend thousands of dollars to modify their machines."

    Demonstrating that odd attachment to the machine, one of its most influential fans, Naritomo Mizutani, has created an entire site about the underside -- that's right, the bottom -- of the machine.

    It was Mizutani's contention that the 2400 was more beautiful because its entire case had been carefully designed, not just the parts that most people see. To prove his point, he created a Web page with pictures of the underside of the 2400, which he compared to the undersides of about 100 other laptops, in particular Windows machines.

    "He was trying to prove the Apple was more beautiful because it used less screws and stickers and panels," Hayashi said.

    There are dozens of other fan sites devoted to the machine, as well as user groups with hundreds of members. In 1999, about 250 PowerBook 2400 fans gathered at Macworld Tokyo for a group picture. There was no gathering this year

    Here's to the crazy ones...

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    Mac Mini (i5 2.5 GHz) & 24" Apple LED CD; Mac Classic; iPad (3G 64GB); iPhone 3G

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