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  1. #1

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    Default iinet, dallas buyers club, privacy p2p?

    So it's finally happened and possibly the first step for Aus ISP's to disclose private info.

    Dallas Buyers Club wins access to pirates' information in iiNet case - CNET

    If you know someone who uses torrent sites and any P2P, how do you think they may react and what would they do next?

    If they weren't already, would they pay for a VPN or just give up and pay for products/services ?

    Interesting times ahead.

    Also, going after iinet are they starting out small and then go after Telstra and Optus etc??

  2. #2

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    I think its funny that this came not only so soon after the data retention laws passed...but also so soon after the launch of Netflix, Stan, Presto, etc...either way, it scares me as I imagine this is only the tip of the iceberg.
    Good. Fast. Cheap. Pick two...

  3. #3

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    Hi
    So let's say I download a movie but don't watch it, it just sits on the hard drive...am I still breaking the law?

    Marcin

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by PO15KA View Post
    Hi
    So let's say I download a movie but don't watch it, it just sits on the hard drive...am I still breaking the law?

    Marcin
    Or what about if your housemates downloaded the movies but the internet is registered under your name? We have a number of students (never again!) rented our spare room, how can they tell who downloaded what?
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  5. #5

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    Default

    Well if it is in your name you pay it! And it is the download that counts, not the viewing. As a cynic (I prefer realist) I believe our Government is looking after their big end mates. Why NBN Rollout rolled to a stop to keep Rupe and Foxtel happy.

  6. #6

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    Downloading a movie is in its own one issue.

    The problem is that if you are to use torrents as a method for downloading the files, in turn you are also uploading the movie to others and helping distribute a pirated copy. And if you seed for a long time, you may share part of the movie to a few hundred people. This then ends up being several breaches of copyright. This is where you can be hit more heavily from a legal perspective.
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  7. #7

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    Default

    Hi lostom,

    I am a regular user of Vuze and I don't know what step to take next.
    I have had a look on the Vuze Forum and they speak of people getting 6 tries before being caught by the pirate "nazis".

    I generally download files many months after release and wonder whether I am a target of the new meta data laws.
    If so I am concerned as my "transgressions" are minor compared to the high end criminals the law was meant to pursue given the statements made in support of the laws by government members prior to it becoming law.
    Should I cancel my Vuze account and take on one of the streaming accounts?
    Last edited by Colin1942; 10th April 2015 at 02:30 PM.
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  8. #8

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    It doesn't matter when you download the files it is still viewed as piracy.

  9. #9

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    I don't think the copyright holders think of minor transgressions mate, you're in or you're not.
    It'll be interesting how this pans out, will iinet appeal will be the first step.

  10. #10
    entropy's Avatar entropy is offline It's the heat death of the universe, my friends

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    Why NBN Rollout rolled to a stop to keep Rupe and Foxtel happy.
    I know this is a meme closely related to MurdocKKK phobia, but seriously, who would stand to gain the most from a high speed internet network that they didn't have to pony up the cash to develop? Foxtel, that's who.

    Higher speeds are good for foxtel and telstra.

    While it certainly opens up more HD streaming options for smaller players, the NBN also greatly increases the reach of Foxtel which is currently limited to cable/sat services that it had to pay to develop. Foxtel doesn't have to pay for the NBN.

    It is who owns the content that matters, and foxtel owns most of it, and has deep enough pockets for this to always be so. In fact I would argue the original NBN would benefit foxtel, and certainly telstra, a hell of a lot more than just about anyone else. Kerry Packer once said "You only get one Alan Bond in your lifetime, and I've had mine" after making a killing over his dealings with Bond over Channel Nine. Combet and Rudd were telstra's Alan Bond in their dealings to buy the copper network.

    The NBN as originally envisaged would make absolutely no difference to that. Personally, a more strategic roll out as per the current strategy to delver faster speeds to more people more quickly, but accept slower top speeds in the short term makes much more sense from a financial point of view. Its not as though the strategy rules out FTTH in the future. The original roll out was bogged down and hardly anyone would get connected for years. This way speeds start increasing for more people more quickly. But yes, regardless of how speeds are increased, the main beneficiaries will still be the content owners like foxtel, regardless of the method to get the data down the pipe.
    Last edited by entropy; 11th April 2015 at 11:02 AM.
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  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by entropy View Post
    I know this is a meme closely related to MurdocKKK phobia, but seriously, who would stand to gain the most from a high speed internet network that they didn't have to pony up the cash to develop? Foxtel, that's who.

    Higher speeds are good for foxtel and telstra.

    While it certainly opens up more HD streaming options for smaller players, the NBN also greatly increases the reach of Foxtel which is currently limited to cable/sat services that it had to pay to develop. Foxtel doesn't have to pay for the NBN.

    It is who owns the content that matters, and foxtel owns most of it, and has deep enough pockets for this to always be so. In fact I would argue the original NBN would benefit foxtel, and certainly telstra, a hell of a lot more than just about anyone else. Kerry Packer once said "You only get one Alan Bond in your lifetime, and I've had mine" after making a killing over his dealings with Bond over Channel Nine. Combet and Rudd were telstra's Alan Bond in their dealings to buy the copper network.

    The NBN as originally envisaged would make absolutely no difference to that. Personally, a more strategic roll out as per the current strategy to delver faster speeds to more people more quickly, but accept slower top speeds in the short term makes much more sense from a financial point of view. Its not as though the strategy rules out FTTH in the future. The original roll out was bogged down and hardly anyone would get connected for years. This way speeds start increasing for more people more quickly. But yes, regardless of how speeds are increased, the main beneficiaries will still be the content owners like foxtel, regardless of the method to get the data down the pipe.
    Foxtel has everything to loose from the NBN. It was Murdoch's media that attacked Gillard and was partially responsible for tearing it down, and the NBN was one of the reasons why that happened. So many Australians have rubbish internet, that is not capable of streaming video, thus why so many have foxtel, but the NBN was going to try and change that as high speed, streaming capable internet was going to become a reality for many.

    Netflix is a huge threat to Foxtel, and they know it. Its funny how Newscorp is the one who wants Netflix taxed. Ironic when Murdoch's companies shift all their profit out of the country to avoid tax.
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  12. #12
    entropy's Avatar entropy is offline It's the heat death of the universe, my friends

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    How does high speed internet harm a content provider like foxtel Oldmacs? the cash cow which is its catalogue merely transfers from a broadcast model to streaming. heck, it could even offer two stream packages depending on whether or not people were prepared to accept (targeted) ads or not embedded into their streams, with very little effort. Other streaming companies would struggle to match that.

    Sure netflix can be a competitor, but if it actually turns into a serious threat to foxtel, this is how it would play out:
    Step 1: Presto (at this stage of the game just a toe in the water/test platform for foxtel) gets built out/expanded with the entire foxtel catalogue. This hasn't happened yet because foxtel is still has plenty of revenue from its cable service. but that will end soon/eventually. This step would exceed the content available in netflix au. But this step merely erodes the competitive threat posed by netflix.

    Step 2: Foxtel streams live sport. The End.

    Don't get me wrong, I don't like foxtel cable and can't see the value proposition for myself, so I don't even subscribe to it. But I do have a netflix account. But I don't let that blind me to the reality that foxtel could dominate streaming over the internet if it wanted to.

    News Ltd, well more precisely, The Australian, didn't like the original NBN simply because the editorial staff are a bunch of economic rationalists who couldn't see how the benefits of a role out of fibre to the home could ever exceed the cost, particularly if the government needed to borrow money that will require future increases in tax to pay it back. A more staged roll out makes more sense to them. I doubt Rupert has spent more than an hour total contemplating the NBN. The tiny weeny proportion of his business that is generated out of Australia just isn't that important, and that even tinier proportion represented by foxtel even less so.
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