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  1. #1

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    Default 2010 MacBook Pro excruciatingly slow

    Hi. My 2010 MacBook Pro is sooooooo sloooow. Is it time to upgrade, or can it be fixed at the Apple Store? Specs are:

    MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2010)
    Processor: 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
    Memory: 4 GB 1067 MHz DDR3
    Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce 320M 256 MB

    Memory: Your Mac contains 2 memory slots, each of which accepts
    a 1067 MHz DDR3 memory module.

    I mainly use the MS Office suite plus several websites operating. It really is impacting on my productivity, as it takes forever to open applications after boot up, and I'm getting sick of constantly seeing the revolving beach ball each time i try to swith apps.

    Grrrr.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel7 View Post
    Hi. My 2010 MacBook Pro is sooooooo sloooow. Is it time to upgrade, or can it be fixed at the Apple Store? Specs are:

    MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2010)
    Processor: 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
    Memory: 4 GB 1067 MHz DDR3
    Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce 320M 256 MB

    Memory: Your Mac contains 2 memory slots, each of which accepts
    a 1067 MHz DDR3 memory module.

    I mainly use the MS Office suite plus several websites operating. It really is impacting on my productivity, as it takes forever to open applications after boot up, and I'm getting sick of constantly seeing the revolving beach ball each time i try to swith apps.

    Grrrr.
    You can upgrade it yourself

    Assuming that it doesn't have problems which are slowing it down, installing an SSD(Solid State Disk Drive) can help massively.
    Plus, IIci, IIsi, LC, LCII, LC III, CC, LC475, LC630, Centris650, 6100, 8100, 5260, 7220, 7600. PB: 100, 150, 160, 165, 540, 190, 5300, 1400. Lombard, iMacG3, iBookG3, iBookG4, PBG4, eMac, iMac G4, PMG4, MiniG4, iMacG5

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel7 View Post
    Hi. My 2010 MacBook Pro is sooooooo sloooow. Is it time to upgrade, or can it be fixed at the Apple Store? Specs are:

    MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2010)
    Processor: 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo
    Memory: 4 GB 1067 MHz DDR3
    Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce 320M 256 MB

    Memory: Your Mac contains 2 memory slots, each of which accepts
    a 1067 MHz DDR3 memory module.

    I mainly use the MS Office suite plus several websites operating. It really is impacting on my productivity, as it takes forever to open applications after boot up, and I'm getting sick of constantly seeing the revolving beach ball each time i try to swith apps.

    Grrrr.
    Thats the same model I just bought last week, ex-Lease. I'm going to go 8GB and a 512GB SSD. It can go to 16GB according to everymac.

  4. #4

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    Default

    I have a similar vintage and spec Mac mini.

    The last month or two it has slowed to a crawl.

    The prime suspect is Google Chrome - that seems to be using more and more memory these days, and limiting the number of open tabs helps, or trying not to run anything else while Chrome is running.

    Firefox seems marginally better, although most of my bookmarks are in Chrome.

    Also my disk was nearly full, which severely limited the amount of swap the system could use. Freeing up about 10GB has helped to a certain extent.

    Short term fixes might help - ultimately I think an upgrade is required, even if to a refurbished last year model of something.
     Late 2009 Mac mini (C2D 2.26GHz),  G4 PowerMac QuickSilver (dual 1GHz),  G4 PowerMac QuickSilver (733MHz),  iPod touch 8G 2nd gen.

  5. #5

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    Or, don't use Chrome or Firefox. Even if you don't like Safari, it doesnt crawl too much. Opera is much leaner than any of them... Hmm... maybe thats where I will save some beachballs. LOL

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyte View Post
    Or, don't use Chrome or Firefox. Even if you don't like Safari, it doesnt crawl too much. Opera is much leaner than any of them... Hmm... maybe thats where I will save some beachballs. LOL
    Agreed. Chrome is a terrible performer on pretty much everything. Even on a 2014 Macbook Pro Retina, Chrome is a disaster - it uses so much more energy, RAM and Processing power than Safari.

    I find that the latest version of Safari is great even on older machines.
    Plus, IIci, IIsi, LC, LCII, LC III, CC, LC475, LC630, Centris650, 6100, 8100, 5260, 7220, 7600. PB: 100, 150, 160, 165, 540, 190, 5300, 1400. Lombard, iMacG3, iBookG3, iBookG4, PBG4, eMac, iMac G4, PMG4, MiniG4, iMacG5

  7. #7

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kyte View Post
    Thats the same model I just bought last week, ex-Lease. I'm going to go 8GB and a 512GB SSD. It can go to 16GB according to everymac.
    Sounds like a good option. Excuse my ignorance: what is a SSD? I have a 500 GB SATA disc. What is the difference between mine and SSD? Also, do you think going from 4 GB memory to 8GB will help?

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel7 View Post
    Sounds like a good option. Excuse my ignorance: what is a SSD? I have a 500 GB SATA disc. What is the difference between mine and SSD? Also, do you think going from 4 GB memory to 8GB will help?
    A SSD (solid state disk drive) is a storage drive that uses flash storage instead of spinning magnetic platters to store your data. Because flash memory is so fast, compared to a traditional spinning hard drive, SSDs are significantly faster than the sort of Hard-drive you currently have.

    Also as there are no moving parts, an SSD is reliable, quiet and runs cooler than a traditional hard drive.

    An SSD would improve pretty much every aspect of your computers performance. I would recommend you buy an SSD to replace your current Harddrive, even before you upgrade the ram - e.g. you're probably going to get a bigger performance improvement with an SSD rather than more ram. However if you have the money to spend go ahead and do both
    Plus, IIci, IIsi, LC, LCII, LC III, CC, LC475, LC630, Centris650, 6100, 8100, 5260, 7220, 7600. PB: 100, 150, 160, 165, 540, 190, 5300, 1400. Lombard, iMacG3, iBookG3, iBookG4, PBG4, eMac, iMac G4, PMG4, MiniG4, iMacG5

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldmacs View Post
    A SSD (solid state disk drive) is a storage drive that uses flash storage instead of spinning magnetic platters to store your data. Because flash memory is so fast, compared to a traditional spinning hard drive, SSDs are significantly faster than the sort of Hard-drive you currently have.

    Also as there are no moving parts, an SSD is reliable, quiet and runs cooler than a traditional hard drive.

    An SSD would improve pretty much every aspect of your computers performance. I would recommend you buy an SSD to replace your current Harddrive, even before you upgrade the ram - e.g. you're probably going to get a bigger performance improvement with an SSD rather than more ram. However if you have the money to spend go ahead and do both
    Fantastic - thanks so much - very much appreciated. I assume I can take my MacBook to an Apple Store and they can replace the disk? Any idea of cost?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel7 View Post
    Fantastic - thanks so much - very much appreciated. I assume I can take my MacBook to an Apple Store and they can replace the disk? Any idea of cost?
    I don't think Apple does SSD upgrades, but if you're happy to open your Mac you can do it yourself...

    The SSD price varies, depending on the size of disk you need. A 500 GB SSD is around $280 I think.
    Plus, IIci, IIsi, LC, LCII, LC III, CC, LC475, LC630, Centris650, 6100, 8100, 5260, 7220, 7600. PB: 100, 150, 160, 165, 540, 190, 5300, 1400. Lombard, iMacG3, iBookG3, iBookG4, PBG4, eMac, iMac G4, PMG4, MiniG4, iMacG5

  11. #11

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    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldmacs View Post
    I don't think Apple does SSD upgrades, but if you're happy to open your Mac you can do it yourself...

    The SSD price varies, depending on the size of disk you need. A 500 GB SSD is around $280 I think.
    Thanks. $280 is certainly a lot cheaper than a new MacBook, so even if I get another 12 or so months out of it, I reckon it's worth the investment. I'm not really game enough to tackle it myself. Should I just go to one of the Apple endorsed service companies? I'm in Sydney, so any recommendations would be welcome

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel7 View Post
    Thanks. $280 is certainly a lot cheaper than a new MacBook, so even if I get another 12 or so months out of it, I reckon it's worth the investment. I'm not really game enough to tackle it myself. Should I just go to one of the Apple endorsed service companies? I'm in Sydney, so any recommendations would be welcome
    Hmm... I'll find out about apple service companies.

    I recently put an SSD in my aunt's 2008 Macbook and she says it runs like new and she hopes to get another few years out of it!

    If you can survive on 256 GB of hard drive space, you can get an SSD for $140... just depends on how much storage you need
    Plus, IIci, IIsi, LC, LCII, LC III, CC, LC475, LC630, Centris650, 6100, 8100, 5260, 7220, 7600. PB: 100, 150, 160, 165, 540, 190, 5300, 1400. Lombard, iMacG3, iBookG3, iBookG4, PBG4, eMac, iMac G4, PMG4, MiniG4, iMacG5

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldmacs View Post
    Hmm... I'll find out about apple service companies.

    I recently put an SSD in my aunt's 2008 Macbook and she says it runs like new and she hopes to get another few years out of it!

    If you can survive on 256 GB of hard drive space, you can get an SSD for $140... just depends on how much storage you need
    I definitely need 500 GB.

  14. #14

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    Mel, go and take a look at ifixit.com before you go spending lots of dollars on getting a Mac guy to do the job for you. It will be a lot more expensive that way. I looked into doing that too, but our local non-Apple people charge $99 to start and $149 an hour and that's not including parts. Ifixit gives excellent instructions, in both text and photo at each step.

    If after you look you decide its still too difficult, thats fine, but don't make the decision until you have seen how easy it could be.
    Here's the link: https://www.ifixit.com/Device/MacBoo...dy_Model_A1342

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by kyte View Post
    Mel, go and take a look at ifixit.com before you go spending lots of dollars on getting a Mac guy to do the job for you. It will be a lot more expensive that way. I looked into doing that too, but our local non-Apple people charge $99 to start and $149 an hour and that's not including parts. Ifixit gives excellent instructions, in both text and photo at each step.

    If after you look you decide its still too difficult, thats fine, but don't make the decision until you have seen how easy it could be.
    Here's the link: https://www.ifixit.com/Device/MacBoo...dy_Model_A1342
    Its a pretty easy installation, if you take your time and you're careful about it.

    The harder part is getting all of your data back onto it - so if you were to do it, make sure you're comfortable with reinstalling OSX, reinstalling applications, copying over data and re setting the computer up (Though a program such as Carbon Copy Cloner may do the trick?)

    I just looked and its $509 at Mac Medic to get a Samsung 500GB SDD installed.... Perhaps if you ordered the SSD separately it would be cheaper, as there are much better value SSDs from brands such as Crucial and OWC.
    Last edited by Oldmacs; 23rd March 2015 at 10:17 PM.
    Plus, IIci, IIsi, LC, LCII, LC III, CC, LC475, LC630, Centris650, 6100, 8100, 5260, 7220, 7600. PB: 100, 150, 160, 165, 540, 190, 5300, 1400. Lombard, iMacG3, iBookG3, iBookG4, PBG4, eMac, iMac G4, PMG4, MiniG4, iMacG5

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel7 View Post
    I definitely need 500 GB.
    Absolutely go for an SSD if you're up for spending a bit on the existing machine - all the posts above are good info and it will make a dramatic difference to the speed - but don't buy just any SSD. The current favourite for reliability and speed seems to be the Crucial MX100 512GB. The Wirecutter goes into the details, but you can be confident it's a good buy.

    I would also recommend increasing the RAM to at least 8GB too. If you do a lot of web browsing and like to have heaps of tabs open at once like everyone seems to do these days, then 8GB is only barely enough.

    The only other thing that may be worth thinking about is why your computer actually is so slow at the moment. I have a friend with a similar machine who was suffering terrible slowdowns and it turned out that she hadn't restarted the machine in many months. There was nothing obviously wrong with it when I checked it and a simple restart made it like new again. You should try this first if you haven't restarted your machine in a while.

    Another possible cause of the symptoms you describe is a disk with less than 10% of free space. This is especially important when you don't have a lot of RAM, as the disk gets used to temporarily store data that doesn't fit into RAM. This is slow at the best of times, but if you're short on disk space, it becomes ridiculously so. Whilst the symptoms aren't as bad with an SSD, they slow down for other reasons when they're nearly full, so I would recommend never going under about 20% free space. I always try to keep mine under half full if I can. They just work better and last longer. Make more use of externals or get a NAS if you need to get stuff off your hard drive.

    If it's not a full disk, then it's possible that some process (application like Word, or Safari, or a system level process) is using up all your processor cycles. A restart will likely fix this too, but the problem will return most likely. It's reasonably easy to know if it's happening on a laptop because the fans will run hard and the battery will not last as well. If that's not happening, then this is not likely to be the issue.

    It would be worth putting a little bit of time into finding out what's dramatically slowing things down now, so you won't have the same issue in the future. The hardware upgrades will improve things, but at least try restarting and checking disk free space before you spend any money. I have also used a free utility called EtreCheck to check for performance issues and found it handy. Basically, if there's anything in red print in the report, it might be causing you some issues. That only takes 5 minutes to download and run, so it might be worth doing too.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by soulman View Post
    Absolutely go for an SSD if you're up for spending a bit on the existing machine - all the posts above are good info and it will make a dramatic difference to the speed - but don't buy just any SSD. The current favourite for reliability and speed seems to be the Crucial MX100 512GB. The Wirecutter goes into the details, but you can be confident it's a good buy.

    I would also recommend increasing the RAM to at least 8GB too. If you do a lot of web browsing and like to have heaps of tabs open at once like everyone seems to do these days, then 8GB is only barely enough.

    The only other thing that may be worth thinking about is why your computer actually is so slow at the moment. I have a friend with a similar machine who was suffering terrible slowdowns and it turned out that she hadn't restarted the machine in many months. There was nothing obviously wrong with it when I checked it and a simple restart made it like new again. You should try this first if you haven't restarted your machine in a while.

    Another possible cause of the symptoms you describe is a disk with less than 10% of free space. This is especially important when you don't have a lot of RAM, as the disk gets used to temporarily store data that doesn't fit into RAM. This is slow at the best of times, but if you're short on disk space, it becomes ridiculously so. Whilst the symptoms aren't as bad with an SSD, they slow down for other reasons when they're nearly full, so I would recommend never going under about 20% free space. I always try to keep mine under half full if I can. They just work better and last longer. Make more use of externals or get a NAS if you need to get stuff off your hard drive.

    If it's not a full disk, then it's possible that some process (application like Word, or Safari, or a system level process) is using up all your processor cycles. A restart will likely fix this too, but the problem will return most likely. It's reasonably easy to know if it's happening on a laptop because the fans will run hard and the battery will not last as well. If that's not happening, then this is not likely to be the issue.

    It would be worth putting a little bit of time into finding out what's dramatically slowing things down now, so you won't have the same issue in the future. The hardware upgrades will improve things, but at least try restarting and checking disk free space before you spend any money. I have also used a free utility called EtreCheck to check for performance issues and found it handy. Basically, if there's anything in red print in the report, it might be causing you some issues. That only takes 5 minutes to download and run, so it might be worth doing too.
    I would also be recommending the Crucial MX100 512 GB - It is $280 on amazon
    Plus, IIci, IIsi, LC, LCII, LC III, CC, LC475, LC630, Centris650, 6100, 8100, 5260, 7220, 7600. PB: 100, 150, 160, 165, 540, 190, 5300, 1400. Lombard, iMacG3, iBookG3, iBookG4, PBG4, eMac, iMac G4, PMG4, MiniG4, iMacG5

  18. #18

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    I prefer to order things like that in Oz, so I've gone with 8GB and 256GB SSD, both Crucial, the SSD is MX200. Now I'm all excited and want the items here right now.

    I'll get the new battery next pay. The Macbook doesnt seem to care that its missing a couple of screws. I found the one I lost, yesterday, whilst vaccing on the other side of the room. Small things travel far when you drop them.

  19. #19

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    An SSD will definitely help and you might find someone on here or a site such as airtasker willing to do it for you a lot cheaper than any repair place. It isn't a difficult job and $50 or so would be reasonable for such an installation. I'd offer if I was in the Sydney area :/

    Before you rush out and buy one (by all means get one if you have the money) there's a few things you can do to try and speed it up, your success may vary and it could be a dying hard drive but the below option are worth a shot, they cost nothing but a few minutes of time.

    1. Restart. After a while things start to slow down, RAM is being used but not released as it should be, things are still running in the background even though you've closed them off. A quick reboot takes nothing.

    2. SMC Reset. Follow this guide https://support.apple.com/en-au/HT201295 to reset the system management controller. The SMC can go into a sort of safety/limp mode like a car where it will assume a worst case scenario because it wasn't getting the information it expected. It doesn't hurt to reset it, the clock will reset (and then automatically set it self again) and the volume will go to about 50% both of which are easily fixed. Personally I've seen performance increases of 4 - 5 times.

    3. Software updates. What version of Mac OS X are you using? And what browser? As said above it's common for Chrome to use more resources than it should and the same goes for older versions of Safari.

  20. #20

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    You know when I first responded to this, saying I had bought the same model... I was wrong. Mine is *not* a pro. so ignore almost everything else I said.

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