• Tuesday Morning News

    Another day, another couple of patents won by Apple. It's really not that hard to work out how this happens Apple apply for patents, the US Patent Office looks at them, and someone with a big rubber stamp puts approved or declined on their patent application. That's pretty much what happens.

    Sometimes a feature that has only existed in the realm of rumour is pushed back to an as-yet-unreleased device, and this time around it's happened with near field communication devices on the iPhone 5, wait, make that 6. We're talking two generations away, people might wanna take a closer look at that crystal ball of yours.

    Also on Patently Apple this morning is the fact that Apple are trademarking Thunderbolt. Wait, isn't that Intel's job?

    iLounge says there is code in iOS 4.3 that points to an A5-powered iPhone 5, which makes sense. Perhaps Apple should just start putting random extraneous code in all versions of IOS just to throw people off the scent, but then people would just complain about having to download an extra hundred megabytes every time an iOS update was released.

    Yes, TUAW, VMWare does bring virtual machines to the iPad, but it's really nothing that hasn't been done or seen before; the VMWare client for iOS isn't, of course, running an virtualised environment, it's simply viewing one over your internet connection.

    Also from TUAW this morning, an admittedly interesting story about why Apple.com hosts movie trailers for upcoming movies, especially when other content-delivery systems could do a much better job. Makes sense, but only if you know the reasons behind the move.

    In case you haven't already read it and with our own iPad launch just ten days away, Macworld have a look at the iPad 2.

    Assuming owners of the current model MacBook Pro can afford it, OWC has confirmed that the new 2011 MacBook Pros support 8GB RAM modules. With two slots in each machine, 16GB of RAM is nothing to laugh at the price, however, is.

    Sometimes life gives you lemons, but sometimes all you want to do is remove a launch agent from launchd, the Mac OS X launch daemon.

    Finally this morning, if you haven't watched the iPad 2 guided tours on the Apple website you really should.
    Comments 11 Comments
    1. mmulhern's Avatar
      mmulhern -
      I don't think I'd be laughing at the cost of 16GB of RAM, more like crying.
    1. stewiesno1's Avatar
      stewiesno1 -
      Yeah but give it a year or so when other memory manufacturers have caught up and like all thing tech , the price will tumble making this a much more attractive option for those needing that extra ounce of grunt. Guys that use a laptop for onsite video work etc need only hook up an external monitor and they would have a very capable workstation.

      Stewie
    1. bennyling's Avatar
      bennyling -
      Quote Originally Posted by stewiesno1 View Post
      Yeah but give it a year or so when other memory manufacturers have caught up and like all thing tech , the price will tumble making this a much more attractive option for those needing that extra ounce of grunt. Guys that use a laptop for onsite video work etc need only hook up an external monitor and they would have a very capable workstation.
      Even with intensive video work, what would you actually use 16GB of RAM for? Running multiple virtual machines simultaneously is just about the only reason I can think of...
    1. bartron's Avatar
      bartron -
      Quote Originally Posted by bennyling View Post
      Even with intensive video work, what would you actually use 16GB of RAM for? Running multiple virtual machines simultaneously is just about the only reason I can think of...
      Anything that uses a large amount of data.
      Photoshop, Aperture, Lightroom etc all love RAM - the more the merrier. I can easily make multi GB photoshop files and the less swapping the better.
      Garageband or any of the pro tools like RAM
      Databases like RAM - and not just traditional databases, but many programs run databases internally for assets and data and will run them better if the entire database can be held in RAM
      And let's not forget the all important e-peen. More RAM = bigger e-peen (for those who care).
    1. Alec Fraser's Avatar
      Alec Fraser -
      Quote Originally Posted by bennyling View Post
      Even with intensive video work, what would you actually use 16GB of RAM for? Running multiple virtual machines simultaneously is just about the only reason I can think of...
      *sigh* If only I'd waited a month so I could buy the MBP Thunderbolt, I could run both my virtual CallManager clusters on a single Mac!!
    1. Tigerz's Avatar
      Tigerz -
      Do you need loads of RAM if you've got an SSD? Isn't it much the same, in effect? (Let's assume that people set it up right for utilising an SSD)
    1. bennyling's Avatar
      bennyling -
      Quote Originally Posted by Tigerz View Post
      Do you need loads of RAM if you've got an SSD? Isn't it much the same, in effect? (Let's assume that people set it up right for utilising an SSD)
      RAM is just as important as a fast hard drive. Run out of RAM and you start doing this thing called "swapping", which is really, really bad on an SSD as you're constantly writing and reading to/from the SSD.
    1. Tigerz's Avatar
      Tigerz -
      Quote Originally Posted by bennyling View Post
      RAM is just as important as a fast hard drive. Run out of RAM and you start doing this thing called "swapping", which is really, really bad on an SSD as you're constantly writing and reading to/from the SSD.
      Isn't that the point of an SSD though? I can see how swapping onto a normal HD would be bad.

      I've asked Jeeves and I can't see the speed difference between RAM and an SSD, I assume there is a lot (due to the place in the interface, perhaps?) so this would account for it, yes?

      Silly me sort of assumed an SSD was basically just like a crap load of RAM all wedged together....
    1. bartron's Avatar
      bartron -
      Quote Originally Posted by Tigerz View Post
      Isn't that the point of an SSD though? I can see how swapping onto a normal HD would be bad.

      I've asked Jeeves and I can't see the speed difference between RAM and an SSD, I assume there is a lot (due to the place in the interface, perhaps?) so this would account for it, yes?

      Silly me sort of assumed an SSD was basically just like a crap load of RAM all wedged together....
      System RAM is volatile and needs power to retain information but because of its simpler design it can support much faster speeds (usually at system bus speed) and can effectively be re-written again and again forever. Very useful temporary storage with fast access.
      The memory used in SSD's though is Flash RAM. It's much slower and each time you re-write a cell it loses a little bit of its ability to be written to again until eventually it fails, somewhere in the 100,000 re-write mark (although is probably much better these days...I haven't researched flash ram for a while), hence using it as a replacement for system ram is a bad idea as system ram is written and re-written to constantly.
    1. bennyling's Avatar
      bennyling -
      Quote Originally Posted by Tigerz View Post
      Isn't that the point of an SSD though? I can see how swapping onto a normal HD would be bad.

      I've asked Jeeves and I can't see the speed difference between RAM and an SSD, I assume there is a lot (due to the place in the interface, perhaps?) so this would account for it, yes?

      Silly me sort of assumed an SSD was basically just like a crap load of RAM all wedged together....
      RAM and SSD are totally different things. SSDs are non-volatile flash memory, kinda like your SD cards and so on mashed together. RAM, on the other hand, is volatile flash memory superfast, but unable to store information once you lose power.

      The "point" of an SSD is that is has A) no moving parts, which means they're brilliant for machines which move around a lot (laptops). B), they're also insanely fast, and due to the technical nature of flash memory have instant access times leading to a huge responsiveness boost. Everything feels so much faster with an SSD, but it's really only because those access times have been (almost completely) nullified.

      RAM speed is more about bandwidth rather than speed. RAM is used for short-term storage only, so it doesn't really matter how much you have (but obviously the more the better).

      SSD speed is more about random and sequential read/writes, as SSDs are used for long-term storage.

      Finally, swapping on an SSD is bad because it means you're wearing out those little chips faster. With magnetic hard drives this isn't an issue, but start dealing with electricity and things can start to become unstable after a while, stop storing data, stop being able to read data.

      EDIT: Oh, so beaten. Must learn to type faster!
    1. The_Hawk's Avatar
      The_Hawk -
      Quote Originally Posted by bennyling View Post
      It's almost time for a mod to split this SSD talk out of the thread...
      New thread here if people would like to take up this discussion:

      SSD Life Expectancy
  • Dropdown

  • New Forum Posts

    Oldmacs

    World's oldest Mac user needs our help.

    He should be fine with Mavericks... its quite similar to Lion which means it should be an easier transition...

    Oldmacs Today, 09:52 AM Go to last post
    rpjallan

    Help! - User account not appearing after login

    When logged in as root, go into the Accounts preference pane and make sure the path to your user folder is correct (I have had instances where the path

    rpjallan Today, 09:26 AM Go to last post
    krolly

    World's oldest Mac user needs our help.

    Sadly, no.
    I was looking through Skype alternatives and thought Facetime would be perfect until I noticed it was solely for Apple products. All

    krolly Today, 09:22 AM Go to last post
    kyte

    Did anyone else buy the MacBook Air 11" through Kogan on eBay?

    Since subbing to groupbuy, I have not had a single email (no, not even to my junk mail) so I guess I'll unsubscribe again. Its worth keeping an eye on

    kyte Today, 06:56 AM Go to last post
    kyte

    Dead iPad battery after 3-years. Apple very unhelpful.

    It does stink, I agree. I wasnt thinking too well when I paid for a replacement OOW for the iPhone 3GS. I will never recover the cost of that. However,

    kyte Today, 06:50 AM Go to last post
    DarkAvenger

    Help! - User account not appearing after login

    I decided to go ahead with the 'How to log in as a root' so I logged out of the primary account and now 'Other' appears in the log in screen so i typed

    DarkAvenger Today, 12:57 AM Go to last post
    rpjallan

    Help! - User account not appearing after login

    Have a look at this:

    Mac Troubleshooting - Reset User Account Permissions

    rpjallan Today, 12:37 AM Go to last post
    rpjallan

    Help! - User account not appearing after login

    That's odd. If the root user is enabled then 'Disable Root User' should not be greyed out. It might be an idea to create a new user with admin privileges

    rpjallan Today, 12:30 AM Go to last post
    DarkAvenger

    Help! - User account not appearing after login

    Ok, currently the drop down menu under 'Edit' of the 'Directory Utility' shows:

    'Disable Root User' (greyed out)

    So does this

    DarkAvenger Today, 12:18 AM Go to last post
    rpjallan

    Help! - User account not appearing after login

    A password box should appear if the root user has never been enabled before. If it has been enabled before then you can just enable/disable it in that

    rpjallan Today, 12:07 AM Go to last post