• Podcasting 101 - Make Sure You Don't Sound Like Crap


    So you wanna do a podcast? Awesome! Podcasts are fun. Luckily for you, the equipment to do so, at broadcast quality, has never been cheaper or easier to use. I can't help you with the content of your podcast (unless you're Louis CK, nobody wants to hear your 3 hour rants, on anything), but I can help you make it sound good and that's half the battle. You could have the best content in the world, but if it hurts my ears, I ain't gonna listen to it. This guide is focussing on doing a podcast with other people in the same room, kinda like a mini radio studio, because that's what I'm asked about the most. Plus they're the most fun type of podcasts to record!

    RECORDING ENVIRONMENT
    The most important thing you need is a location to record, that has a good audio environment. The aim here is to record somewhere with lots of soft surfaces and in a relatively small room. A big room will introduce echo, and a room with hard surfaces will create reflections - these are bad. You probably can't make your own soundproof booth, but some simple acoustic treatment will make a major impact, more than buying a fancier microphone.

    If you're in a large room, create a smaller room inside of it with tripods and thick blankets. If you're after something more permanent, stick acoustic tiles on the walls of your room. Basically, you want to be enclosed in a padded cell. Check out this YouTube video of someone reviewing acoustic blankets:



    This video is also good at demonstrating what room acoustic treatment means:



    Wrap your room in as much soft stuff as you can and you'll have a great sounding podcast, regardless of your gear. Obviously, you want to turn off any fans/air conditioners/noisy computers/external HDDs, etc. silence is required except for the voices on the podcast.

    MICROPHONES
    USB microphones are awesome for doing quick recordings on your computer, but if you want to use multiple mics at once, then USB mics are useless. You need a mixer and some XLR microphones. There's hundreds of microphones out there, but there's some particularly suited for audio and are excellent bang for buck. There's two types of microphones - condensor and dynamic. Don't worry about the pros and cons of each one, what matters is the condensor mics need phantom power and dynamic mics don't (generally), so if you grab condensor mics, make sure the mixer you're plugging them in to supplies phantom power on the XLR socket you plan to plug the mic into.

    If you're really strapped for cash, the 'Behringer C-1 goes for only $60 and sounds perfectly acceptable. If you've got a little more money to spend, the Audio Technica AT2020 is great bang for back at $129. My favourite is the Rode Procaster, when used with a shockmount (which absorbs vibrations), it's as good as any broadcast mic out there and only costs $195 (the shockmount is $49).


    If you're really well off for cash, the Shure SM7B and the Electrovoice RE-20 are in pretty much every radio studio in the world.

    This video from Rode is an excellent guide on how to talk into your microphone properly, regardless of brand or type:



    You need a stand for the microphones too, so grab a few desk mount stands, like these from Swamp Audio. If you want something more permanent, the Rode PSA-1 microphone boom arm can be clamped or drilled into a desk and is perfect for setting up your own radio studio. Oh, and don't forget XLR cables - one end goes into the mic, the other into the mixer. You need one cable per mic.

    MIXING & RECORDING
    All those microphones plug in to a mixer. Traditionally, you would plug the mixer into a computer soundcard and the computer will record it. In the past year or so, there's a bunch of mixers available that record directly on to their own flash memory. I love these units because it removes the computer from the recording equation. Computers like to crash and make noises and generally get in the way.

    The Zoom R16 and R24 are the best of the bunch. They're priced very well, with the Zoom R16 going for only $400 including postage off eBay from the USA (its around $600 locally). Just plug in the mics, insert in an SD card, set your levels and press record. When done, take the SD card out, chuck it on your computer and edit away.

    Here's a review of the R16 from YouTube. The R16 and R24 are similar, but if you need more than 4x phantom power XLR inputs, get the R24. You can also plug either one into your computer and use it as a USB mic interface *and* it can run off a battery. Very handy little things:



    If $400 is still too much cash, there is a cheaper way to achieve similar quality, albeit with more complexity. Grab a cheap Behringer mixer, the XENYX 1202FX wil do fine ($139) and get a 2x RCA to 3.5mm cable and plug one end in to the line-in socket on your computer and the other into the Tape Output on the mixer. It won't sound as nice, but it's fine if you're on a budget.

    MONITORING
    At least one person in the group should have on a pair of headphones, to make sure everyone sounds good. Get a pair of comfortable headphones (the AKG K44 studio headphones are only $45), plug it in to the headphone socket on your mixer and that's all you need to do. If you want everyone in the group to have a pair of headphones, so everyone can monitor their own audio, get a headphone amplifier like the Behringer HA400. The headphone amp is also useful if you're playing back audio in your recording session (e.g: a pre recorded clip or a phone call) and want your fellow podcasters to hear it, as you can't use speakers - they'll cause an echo.

    EDITING
    I'm not going to give you a tutorial on how to edit audio, but here are some handy tips I've learned that are not common knowledge:

    Record at 16-bit, 44.1kHz and in mono. Mono audio is fine for a podcast. Putting one person in the left channnel and another in the right is plain annoying. Keep is simple, you aren't good enough to toy with audio effects if you're reading this article. Don't bother putting each mic into its own channel either. If you're using the Zoom R16 for example, just downmix it to audio directly on the device.

    Use the Levelator. I love this thing. Just feed it your raw audio before you edit it and it will even out people who were talking quiet and those shouting in to the mic. It's works so well to make your group conversation sound less jarring to the listener.

    Audio editing programs can be difficult to use, so just use whatever you're comfortable with, it makes no difference in the end what app edited the show. I personally like Adobe Audition.

    Choosing an exporting format for your show can be tricky. I personally like to keep it modern and use HE-AAC at 48kbit/sec and mono 44.1kHz (which everything made in the past 5 or so years supports), but for the widest compatibility, just use MP3, CBR, 64kbit/sec, mono 44.1kHz. Any higher bitrate is a waste of time for audio only podcasts.

    PUBLISHING
    This also isn't a tutorial on how to put your podcast on the Internet. But if you want something easy and quick, use Libsyn. Great service and works well. Make sure you write a proper synopsis for the episode/show - people like to know what they're gonna listen to. Good cover art for your podcast is important as well. Don't leave it blank.

    Hope this helped you get a grip on podcasting! If you do end up making a show with the help of these notes, please let me know, so I can take a listen. If you have any questions, feel free to post a comment and I'll try my best to answer it.
    Comments 7 Comments
    1. tcn33's Avatar
      tcn33 -
      What do you recommend for those who aren't running a podcast, but occasionally guest on one via Skype?
    1. Peter Wells's Avatar
      Peter Wells -
      Quote Originally Posted by tcn33 View Post
      What do you recommend for those who aren't running a podcast, but occasionally guest on one via Skype?
      THe Blue Yeti or the Rode Podcaster - or any other decent usb mic. Headsets aren't that great cos people mouthbreath or rub the cord on their shirts.
    1. tcn33's Avatar
      tcn33 -
      $150 for the Yeti is a bit spendy for occasional guest types.
    1. decryption's Avatar
      decryption -
      Quote Originally Posted by tcn33 View Post
      $150 for the Yeti is a bit spendy for occasional guest types.
      All the USB mics cheaper than it are kinda shitty. I have a Samson C01U, it's around $80 and not very good to be honest. May as well spend the extra, it's a decent investment, as its not like there's gonna be a new model in a few months to supersede it. You can keep a good mic for years. Do screencasts, video voice overs, etc, as well as podcasts.
    1. Peter Wells's Avatar
      Peter Wells -
      And if you're only the occasional guest, then a $150 mic will still only be like $20 an appearance after a year. For all the love and admiration and hookers and blow and respect and money you'll get as a podcaster, totes worth it.
    1. Snow Leopard's Avatar
      Snow Leopard -
      Great guide, Anthony. I tend to find that in the room podcasts are the easiest to listen to and it really does count when it sounds decent, especially since I primarily listen to podcasts using headphones.
    1. gallet's Avatar
      gallet -
      The Zoom H2 is a nice USB mic for $230 that is also a digital recorder as well for outside interviews. Plus it is stereo which can be handy for interviews.
  • Dropdown

  • New Forum Posts

    Orestes

    OS X Yosemite Public Beta

    You would think the amount of times I've complained to Apple I'd be on their list as well, but most of my issues have been hardware rather than software

    Orestes Today, 12:51 PM Go to last post
    Thingme

    OS X Yosemite Public Beta

    I didn't pay $99 to enter the OS X Dev Preview Program. It's always cost me nothing.
    I was invited to participate.
    The only reason I can

    Thingme Today, 12:03 PM Go to last post
    Orestes

    OS X Yosemite Public Beta

    Of course, some of us just want poke around and report the more unusual things that have slipped through the cracks. Not all of us want to pay the $99

    Orestes Today, 11:10 AM Go to last post
    Drifter

    Anyone found a good use for Launchpad yet?

    I use it for programs not in my dock and newly installed apps.

    Drifter Today, 10:25 AM Go to last post
    Alan53

    Right click is crashing my mac mini... its FRUSTRATING me!

    ...

    Alan53 Today, 10:11 AM Go to last post
    soulman

    Right click is crashing my mac mini... its FRUSTRATING me!

    Fair enough. Did you try creating another user?

    soulman Today, 09:13 AM Go to last post
    harryb2448

    Anyone found a good use for Launchpad yet?

    Also have the very minimum number of icons on Dock and use Launchpad. Great!

    harryb2448 Today, 08:46 AM Go to last post
    Thingme

    OS X Yosemite Public Beta

    Please note those participating in the Yosemite Dev Preview program have certain entitlements lacking from the Public Beta program.

    *

    Thingme Today, 08:04 AM Go to last post
    Orestes

    OS X Yosemite Public Beta

    You have to go to the Apple Seed Website and get a code for the Mac App Store, it's not an email. Meanwhile I'm up and running, although the installer

    Orestes Today, 05:22 AM Go to last post
    Oldmacs

    OS X Yosemite Public Beta

    I signed up pretty much straight away and have no redemption code :/

    Oldmacs Today, 04:39 AM Go to last post