PDA

View Full Version : Ahhhhh! Time Machine Works



mmulhern
5th January 2011, 10:28 PM
Just booted the missus's iMac after restoring from Time Machine, and all is good.

I've played with Time Machine doing restores, but this is the first time that I've actually had to restore for real, and it all went smoothly, except when you've got a real world user,with real world data, that 4 hours to restore seems to go on forever.

And what happened I hear you ask. This evening I did the TM backup, 10.6.0 upgrade, 10.6.5 combo, and then on the last reboot, grey screen and a slashed circle. Wouldnt boot, couldn't Safe Boot, DiskUtilities on the 10.6 DVD couldn't find any problems. Disk Warrior couldn't find anything wrong, so TM restore time.

Rather than burn time fixing the problem tonight, I decided discretion the better part of valour, and retreated to the safety of a known working backup.

Will try the upgrade again on the weekend, prepare with some google foo, and have the weapons ready.

So peoples, if you haven't got Time Machine, or some other backup régime in place, go buy yourself an external drive, they are cheap as these days, and get Time Machine setup!!!!! Make it your New Year's Resolution, one that you can actually keep.

Stez
5th January 2011, 11:18 PM
There was a thread with pretty much this more bluntly a week ago, and it is so true, and needs to be repeated again and again, but the cry for help after people ignore these warnings and lose important data just goes to show how ignorant some people are.

Rust
6th January 2011, 10:15 AM
Love TM...Even with something as simple as buying a new Mac...TM restore to the new machine and bang! Up and running no fuss :)

alextrob
6th January 2011, 10:33 AM
Time Machine is great and I've used it quite a few times both for restoring individual files and restoring from a format & reinstall.

For restoring a whole system full of data, nothing beats the speed that you can get back up and running when you have a Carbon Copy Clone (http://www.bombich.com/). CCC's not as simple and integrated as Time Machine but I run it every now and then (mainly before major updates) just in case anything goes wrong. If anything does go wrong, you can just boot off your external hard drive and set CCC to clone back on to your internal hard drive. You can even keep using your computer (though a bit slowly) while all your stuff gets cloned back.

mmulhern
6th January 2011, 10:54 AM
Time Machine is great and I've used it quite a few times both for restoring individual files and restoring from a format & reinstall.

For restoring a whole system full of data, nothing beats the speed that you can get back up and running when you have a Carbon Copy Clone (http://www.bombich.com/). CCC's not as simple and integrated as Time Machine but I run it every now and then (mainly before major updates) just in case anything goes wrong. If anything does go wrong, you can just boot off your external hard drive and set CCC to clone back on to your internal hard drive. You can even keep using your computer (though a bit slowly) while all your stuff gets cloned back.

I agree, CCC is great, but when you have an active Time Machine, the last backup before major changes can take literally seconds, and the fact that you can restore back to any point in the backup, not just the latest, is just another reason I love Time Machine.

alextrob
6th January 2011, 11:18 AM
I agree, CCC is great, but when you have an active Time Machine, the last backup before major changes can take literally seconds, and the fact that you can restore back to any point in the backup, not just the latest, is just another reason I love Time Machine.

Yeah, the incremental backups in Time Machine is very useful and I do use it a fair bit (though sometimes it's hard to remember that it's even there). The combination of the two backup systems works well for me - and backup redundancy is never a bad thing.

Bisonex
6th January 2011, 08:14 PM
I own both a Mac desktop (2-years old) and a Mac Book (4-years old). These are a mixed blessing - good in some respects and problematic in other respects.

Today, I tried to back up my desk top files onto my Mac Book with the aid of a fire wire and Time Machine. Nowhere can I find proper instructions on how to do this. Typically, Apple's own site uses its own jargon so it might as well be in Chinese as I haven't a clue what they are talking about.

Can anyone please explain to me, in simple English, how to perform this supposedly straightforward task?

Thanks,

Bisonex