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View Full Version : Bulging batteries covered under Applecare?



MissionMan
21st August 2010, 08:43 PM
I know Apple sometimes classify batteries as consumables, but are bulging batteries covered under Applecare. My wife found her left mouse button had stopped working this evening and upon further examination, I discovered the battery had bulged so much it had popped the bottom case open (the removable battery found on the late 2008 unibody macbook pro). We've booked it in with Apple on Thursday and I've removed it from the case for safety purposes.

Do they cover this under Applecare (it has Applecare to 2011) given the fact that its not a generic battery life issue, its actually a safety issue?

cosmichobo
21st August 2010, 08:46 PM
I'd not take no for an answer on that.

glitch
21st August 2010, 09:42 PM
Its hit and miss, I have had success with a couple that did it on mine, tried to get one for a friend that had his actually split in 2! Its a known fault, its covered in Australian Law by statutory warranty even if you dont have APP, but Apple were absolute pricks about it.

They flat out refused to do anything about it and consumer affairs told him he would need to escalate it to the small claims tribunal to get settlement, in this case he couldnt be bothered pursuing it and just bought a new battery.

Sadly he says he will never buy another Apple product after the way he was treated, but I am sure Mr Jobs wont lose any sleep over that!

Give it a shot, tell them you know its a documented problem and see how you go, I reckon with APP you may well have a happy outcome.

There is no doubt that if you are prepared to take it all the way to small claims you will win.

MissionMan
21st August 2010, 09:57 PM
Thanks. Will let you know the outcome.

danielparsons
21st August 2010, 11:29 PM
I had the bulging battery problem with my MB Pro a little after it's second birthday. I took it into the Genius at the Chermside Applestore and scored a brand new one, gratis with no AppleCare in sight.

He must of liked my kitten eyes and toothless grin!

cejay
22nd August 2010, 10:20 AM
I don't have Applecare and my late 2008 Unibody battery bulged and was changed under a one time extended warranty a couple of months ago. I called their support line and went through the process with the 2nd level support person and they updated my warranty file. Went into my local Apple reseller and they placed the order and 3 days later I had a new battery.

The key was the cycle count and the age of the unit, coupled with the resellers diagnostic that indicated that the battery had failed. So I'd assume that if they did that for me with no Applecare, they'd look after you with Applecare.

Good luck because otherwise its $200

billybob
22nd August 2010, 11:45 AM
Here is the answer to all your battery questions - Will Apple replace my Battery? (http://forums.mactalk.com.au/24/84711-can-i-still-use-my-mac.html#post966208)

Ultimately your best course of action is to take your MBP and battery into a service centre to have it tested. You will get your answer within a minute or two :-)



I know Apple sometimes classify batteries as consumables, but are bulging batteries covered under Applecare. My wife found her left mouse button had stopped working this evening and upon further examination, I discovered the battery had bulged so much it had popped the bottom case open (the removable battery found on the late 2008 unibody macbook pro). We've booked it in with Apple on Thursday and I've removed it from the case for safety purposes.

Do they cover this under Applecare (it has Applecare to 2011) given the fact that its not a generic battery life issue, its actually a safety issue?

glitch
22nd August 2010, 01:41 PM
Here is the answer to all your battery questions -

Actually thats some answers based on Apple's likely response. As I & others have posted this can vary greatly depending on who at Apple you end up dealing with.

The other important thing to note is your rights under consumer protection laws in Australia, you need to follow the process correctly, but you will get a bulging battery replaced eventually if you can be bothered pressing your rights to statutory warranty.

beattz
23rd August 2010, 01:27 PM
About 18 months ago, the battery in my 17" MacBook Pro swelled overnight on charge. The laptop had a couple of months of AppleCare left (I got the 3-year extended plan at the time of the laptop purchase), and the battery had been performing adequately at that point (didn't last quite as long as when new, but was still very usable) so I thought it would simply be a case of calling Apple and getting them to ship me a new one.

When calling Apple I was referred to a technical department representative who, after I described my problem, asked me to open System Profiler and quote the Battery Health Information (i.e. Cycle Count and Condition). Since the cycle count was over 300, he said it was therefore not covered by AppleCare any more. I argued the point that from my perspective, the battery was fine one day, then broken the next, through no fault of my own, and I still had warranty left, so they should cover it. He said he couldn't do anything because it was policy not to replace a battery of more than 300 cycles. I asked to speak to his supervisor, explained the situation to him, adding that I have been a loyal Apple customer all of my life, have always purchased extended AppleCare and have never had to make a claim. Straight away he said, "yeah no problem" and shipped me a new battery overnight (to the nearest Apple reseller).

billybob
23rd September 2010, 12:34 PM
Actually thats some answers based on Apple's likely response. As I & others have posted this can vary greatly depending on who at Apple you end up dealing with.


And of course, with any rules there are also exceptions. Apple can choose to make an exception if you present a good enough reason.

Quoting again for the sake of clarity.


The other important thing to note is your rights under consumer protection laws in Australia, you need to follow the process correctly, but you will get a bulging battery replaced eventually if you can be bothered pressing your rights to statutory warranty.

People tend to pull out the statutory warranty rights card without fully understanding what they mean, what they will cover and if it is applicable to their particular circumstance. As per my post a swollen battery is just another symptom of a consumed battery. It's not an opinion on my or anyone else's part, it's chemistry. A scientific fact so to speak.

Apple will replace a swollen battery under the circumstances I noted, and if you think about their policy in regard to swollen battery's you'll see that they choose to err on the side of caution and replace a battery even when they are not required to.

A swollen battery is a visually confronting image. When someone experiences one their first though is that something is wrong. For the majority of people it's an understandable reaction because most don't have and engineering or chemistry background and don't really understand what's going on when a battery swells.

Apple choose to have a generous replacement policy with swollen batteries in order to assist with customer "perception". They also have created the battery test software that any Apple store or AASP can run for you to assess the health of your battery. (whether it's swollen or not.) It give's numerical details of your batteries health as well as a visual representation, and you are encouraged to watch the test as it is being done and see the results for yourself firsthand.

MissionMan
23rd September 2010, 12:37 PM
Just to update you, they wouldn't replace it at first because the laptop was over a year old (but still under warranty). They said their policy on batteries is 1 year/300 cycles. My laptop had only done 150. After a bit of arguing, they agree to do an out of warranty replacement free of charge. I simply argued it on the basis that I can accept battery life reducing during a batteries life but when a battery expands to a point where it forces open the battery door and stops the keyboard working, I consider that a battery fault.

marc
23rd September 2010, 12:42 PM
Great to hear.

I had a similar issue with an out of warranty MacBook Pro (first gen). The battery hadn't done any damage to the Mac and they replaced the battery with no questions asked. Very happy with the outcome. It seemed like the Genius had seen a similar issue before.

I think a big part of your success relies on two main factors:
- If they've seen the issue before and have a precedent set by Apple.
- If it's borderline or unusual, then being nice always helps.

cappuccino
23rd September 2010, 04:40 PM
If you bought from Apple store, speak with manager, Apple store managers are authorized to do things 'outside' norm, like refunds outside the 14 day period etc etc. if you didn't buy from apple store, try anyways.

Sydney Apple store manager is wonderful!

cocolero
9th February 2011, 03:23 PM
Hi there, mine has also bulged and been rejected by Genii at the Sydney Apple Store on George Street.

I am raising the matter at a Fair Trading Tribunal in the next couple of weeks and would appreciate any supporting evidence of Apple granting other customers a battery replacement for out-of-warranty MBPs with the same problem.

I will post any learnings and results in this thread to keep us all updated here:

http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies.cfm?t=1588757

glitch
9th February 2011, 03:58 PM
If you are prepared to take the battle up to Apple you will win in the end, legally they have to replace the battery - but taking on an agressive corporate like Apple is not easy and may not be worth it for $200.

Check the new Consumer Laws on the ACCC website, they came into effect on the 1st of Jan and give much stronger consumer protection and override the old laws that existed under each state's fair trading act. What I am not sure is how they will treat claims after 1st Jan for products bought prior to 1st of Jan.

Good luck, I have had mixed results with Apple replacing some without question and the last one they simply refused to replace and the effort & cost to recover $200 wasnt worth it IMO.

You should dig up the Apple documentation about the battery replacement program too, thats proof that Apple new about the manufacturing fault and accepted liability, now they are saying that program is finished and they wont replace - not something I think the ACCC would have any sympathy with!

skyhawkmatthew
9th February 2011, 04:25 PM
Bulging batteries are certainly covered under AppleCare. My brother's 2007 17" MacBook Pro developed a bulging battery a few weeks ago - called Apple and they immediately replaced it.

~Coxy
10th February 2011, 04:09 PM
They are not covered under AppleCare. It's great that your brother got a free replacement but these things are very case-by-case.