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Mundane
13th July 2010, 05:07 PM
If I use Boot Camp to install Windows on a MacBook Pro, will there be any lag in the future?

I'm planning to get a MacBook Pro, the recent release "Intel Core i5 2.4GHz CPU, 15 Inch Screen, 4 GB Ram, 320 GB HDD, Apple Snow Leopard", and I intend to install Windows on it using Boot Camp as I am only going to be playing COD6 and Warcraft 3 - for gaming purposes only.

Now, before I buy one of these, I wish to consult with people who have experiences in this area. With the above specs, I am afraid that there will be lag in the future like booting up your Mac, stuff like that. One logic will say that due to the higher quality of specs, there will be less lag, and of lower quality means the higher chances of lag.

I want to confirm if this is true, and has any of you experienced a similar difficulty or problem on your Mac after installing Windows on your Mac using Boot Camp? I wish to know. Thanks!

~Coxy
13th July 2010, 06:07 PM
Windows and Mac OS are completely seperate. One cannot lag the other, except maybe if the hard disk was too full after partitioning.

Warcraft 3 has a Mac OS X version so you can play that natively. COD6 not yet obviously.

If you can afford the i7 model, I would get that instead as it has 512MB of VRAM that the i5 does not.

glacierdave
13th July 2010, 06:21 PM
If I use Boot Camp to install Windows on a MacBook Pro, will there be any lag in the future?

I guess that's going to depend on what you consider lag to be.

If you're only using BootCamp then you're either running OS X or Windows but not both. Either operating system has full access to the hardware and will run at it's full potential.

However, many other factors affect how well an operating system functions. If your hard drive (or the partition you're booting from) is full, it'll be slower. If you're running heaps of background tasks when you boot, it'll be slower. If your operating system gets damaged in some way it'll be slower... and so on.

For certain, having BootCamp on your Mac won't be the cause of your computer running slower. Other factors, though, will still matter.

Mundane
13th July 2010, 07:49 PM
Ahh, okay.


If you can afford the i7 model, I would get that instead as it has 512MB of VRAM that the i5 does not.

Yeah, According to JB Hi-fi, the difference are $200. Gonna have to consider that into it.


For certain, having BootCamp on your Mac won't be the cause of your computer running slower. Other factors, though, will still matter.

Hmm, you might have a point on that.

I heard some of the people in the other forums said they get slow startup problems after the Windows installation in their Mac, and also how it gets frozen at some point. Some even complaint about a mouse problem!

Anyway, I'm planning to get a MacBook Pro. I've been doing all sorts of consultations all over the web before I make any rash decision. I like MacBook Pro and I want something that has a solid lifespan, so I reckon Mac would be a good option to me and I am also not a hardcore gamer - an average one, with probably one or two games installed in the Windows platform.

Which is why I'm trying to make the whole thing out of it. Use Mac for my university work and Windows only for gaming purposes - which is only one or two.

glacierdave
14th July 2010, 08:06 AM
I heard some of the people in the other forums said they get slow startup problems after the Windows installation in their Mac, and also how it gets frozen at some point. Some even complaint about a mouse problem!

If they're using Parallels, VMWare or VirtualBox then you could see some of these issues. BootCamp, however, is a completely separate OS install. The two don't interact. You've got one running, or the other.

Well, I guess if someone had a flawed BootCamp install that might mess with the things but that's more an issue with it not getting done right than with the technology itself.



Anyway, I'm planning to get a MacBook Pro. I've been doing all sorts of consultations all over the web before I make any rash decision. I like MacBook Pro and I want something that has a solid lifespan, so I reckon Mac would be a good option to me and I am also not a hardcore gamer - an average one, with probably one or two games installed in the Windows platform.

Which is why I'm trying to make the whole thing out of it. Use Mac for my university work and Windows only for gaming purposes - which is only one or two.

With gaming your main thing would be to check system requirements vs the MacBook Pro you want to buy. As long as it meets the minimum you should be fine - after all, when you're booted into Windows your Windows install has full access to the hardware just like if you had a PC instead.

Mundane
14th July 2010, 03:20 PM
Ahh... I see. Thanks a lot.