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View Full Version : Swapped hard drives, but won't boot.



Bogus Jimmy
7th June 2010, 05:18 PM
I've just bought a new MacBook Pro. I took the hard drive out of my old MacBook Pro and put it into the new MacBook Pro, but it won't boot.

I have run the hardware test with no problems. I can boot from the included install CD (and see my drive in Disk Utility) but if I try to boot straight from the drive it just sits there with a nice shiny (high res) Apple logo on a grey background.

Any ideas?

Bogus Jimmy
7th June 2010, 05:26 PM
Just occurred to me to try and "Repair Disk".

bennyling
7th June 2010, 05:28 PM
Bzzt, wrong way to do it AFAIK.

The difference between the models means there's low-level "stuff" (kernel extensions, whatnot) you'll need that comes standard on the default install of the new machine - that won't have come with your old one.

Could try an reinstall over the top of whatever you have now, but the easiest way would be to do a migration (or restore via Time Machine backup) with the stock drive in the machine.

Failing that, wipe the old HD, stick it in the new machine, install OSX, migrate. Bazinga!

Brains
7th June 2010, 05:30 PM
You're doing it wrong -- Apple's way of jigging the OS and hardware together means that trick sometimes doesn't work.

What you should do is this:
- Put both drives back where they were
- Start up the new MacBook Pro from that machine's OSX installer DVD (no other discs, only the one that came with the new machine)
- Launch Disk Utility from the 'Utilities' menu
- Select the hard drive and erase it
- Quit and start a fresh installation of OSX
- Whilst it is getting its act together, dig out a FireWire cable that can join the two machines together, and start up the old machine in Target Disk Mode by pressing and hold the T key down at the chime and letting go when the screen lights up with the FireWire logo
- Eventually, the OSX installer on the new machine will ask if you want to transfer data. Say "From another machine" and follow the instructions; join the two Macs together with the FireWire cable, and let it suck over all of your account information, docs, settings and non-standard-OS programs.
- Let it restart when it's all done, and you'll be left with absolutely everything on the new machine looking just like the old machine.

Bogus Jimmy
7th June 2010, 05:36 PM
The only thing is that my old hard drive is bigger than the new one (500 vs 320) so I want to end up with the 500 in the new machine.

I did a Time Machine backup just before I started messing around so I guess I'll just migrate from that.

It would've just been so damn easy if it "just worked"...

bennyling
7th June 2010, 05:40 PM
It would've just been so damn easy if it "just worked"...

Sure, but how is an older version of OSX supposed to carry around stuff for unreleased hardware? ;)

Putting all those new bits in Software Updates isn't really the solution, either - just means that Software updates would be bigger than they currently are.

Bogus Jimmy
7th June 2010, 06:00 PM
Sure, but how is an older version of OSX supposed to carry around stuff for unreleased hardware? ;)

How is it an old version of OSX? I was running 10.6.3 on my old MBP. Obviously it wouldn't have drivers for the new stuff, but it could just get that from Software Update after the first boot.

In a pinch, I've swapped hard drives in completely different PCs. The drivers were all messed up, but it worked (enough to get install new drivers).

I've seen schools use loan machines (MacBooks) and swap hard drives to different machines with no problems, so I though I could do the same (although these were almost identical machines).

bartron
7th June 2010, 06:29 PM
Was your old machine a C2D and the new one i5 or i7? The boot kernel for the C2D machines won't work on the newer i5's and i7's.

If your restore dvd's are 10.6.3 you might be able to pop the old drive in the new mac and run the restore dvd on the old drive and it will upgrade the kernel. I know this works when I went from an older 10.6.2 install to a 10.6.3 install on an i7 MacBook Pro...not sure if it will let you if the target drive is already 10.6.3.

Bogus Jimmy
7th June 2010, 07:22 PM
Was your old machine a C2D and the new one i5 or i7? The boot kernel for the C2D machines won't work on the newer i5's and i7's.

If your restore dvd's are 10.6.3 you might be able to pop the old drive in the new mac and run the restore dvd on the old drive and it will upgrade the kernel. I know this works when I went from an older 10.6.2 install to a 10.6.3 install on an i7 MacBook Pro...not sure if it will let you if the target drive is already 10.6.3.

Core 2 Duo. I wish I read that before I wiped the drive. Oh well, it's migrating now. Only 3 hours to go...

milliedog
8th June 2010, 04:12 AM
I'm surprised this doesn't work as I always had success with this kind of thing in the past. I've just recently cloned 10.5.8 from a G5 to C2D iMac (a very different hardware architecture) with no problems.

But I guess for future reference, the process of checking beforehand would involve using the old computer in firewire target mode or a cloned external disk to boot the new computer.

Bogus Jimmy
8th June 2010, 05:42 AM
I guess I assumed (and you know what they say....)

JimWOz
8th June 2010, 10:45 AM
I'm surprised this doesn't work as I always had success with this kind of thing in the past. I've just recently cloned 10.5.8 from a G5 to C2D iMac (a very different hardware architecture) with no problems.

10.5 Leopard retail disks make a universal install, for both PPC and Intel architectures.

I have never had this problem in the past either, (other than for intel only or PPC only systems). - But aren't the new machines later than the release of 10.6.3, meaning they are a new system, so hopefully 10.6.4 release will deliver a system that is universal to all Intel machines, restoring the status quo. - Having a current system that will boot everything has been invaluable.- I still remember the old system 7-8 days where there were different system enablers needed for every model machine, grrhhh!!