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Beast5500
7th September 2005, 11:01 AM
Which linux distro is the best to match up with a mac base machine?

I know i'm not being too specific on the question, but please suggest which linux distro suits the powerpc base the best.

I'm after any advice. and would be keen to hear about what people have experinced with a linux os on a mac base.

i.e. what would be the best given xxx of a situation.

purana
7th September 2005, 11:03 AM
That is a difficult question..

Alot of distros are in the flavour of powerpc. What suits me however might not suit yourself. Just because I think XYZ is best, doesn't mean you will.

However your wording of the question about the best linux distro for base mac is in my opinion very broad and would lead to a distro war.

How about you narrow your question down a little or give us an idea for such a post and topic, then we might be able to give you an opinion based on what I think would suit you in the way of linux on mac.

PS. I hope to install debian powerpc flavour onto a G3 B&W tower for the first time in the next few days.

Beast5500
8th September 2005, 10:31 AM
ok. to sort of narrow down the question to be a bit more accurate:
what sort of distro would be best in what regards.

e.g. **** would be best for **** purpose on **** of a machine.

Danamania
8th September 2005, 10:42 AM
For server stuff, I adore debian. From all I've heard gentoo does things just as well.

For a desktop to be used by someone who doesn't want to screw around with the OS, Ubuntu/Kubuntu look to have it really together - plenty more stuff Just Works with those.

I found Mandrake and Yellowdog to run like... uh... dogs, in comparison to Debian.

Byrd
8th September 2005, 10:50 AM
I've dabbled in Linux - specifically Yellowdog on a PM9600, but came to the conclusion that OS X (hell, even OS 9) are faster and provide much better applications and hardware support. Linux on a PPC, to me, isn't nescessary - but I'm sure others don't share that view :)

Another OS to try, if you can find it, is BeOS 5 - it's still being developed, albeit fairly stagnant when compared to Linux. It provides a good trade off between speed, flexibility and software. Unfortunately, it only runs well on PCI-based PowerMacs made before G3's came commonplace.

JB

jobe
8th September 2005, 11:16 AM
yep. Dana's got me hooked on debian. I now find myself SSHing to it during lectures at uni to tweak it.

Beast5500
8th September 2005, 12:25 PM
what runs best on the old school machines? debian sounds the go. what is the minimum requirements for XWindows?

purana
8th September 2005, 02:11 PM
I just installed Debian onto a G3 B&W 350Mhz lastnight with 256mb ram and 10gb disk. It installed fine with no errors. Good to see for a machine of this age.

pipsqeek
9th September 2005, 04:50 PM
I'll be doing the same to the iBook in a few years time (if it doesn't sell) :P

I suspect it will run OS X pretty good in years to come, but just to try something different as well.

pipsqeek

Danamania
9th September 2005, 05:28 PM
Originally posted by Beast5500@Sep 8 2005, 12:25 PM
what runs best on the old school machines? debian sounds the go. what is the minimum requirements for XWindows?
I don't think ubuntu will run (at least, without messing about) on the oldworld (non-translucent coloured) Macs.

For 68K macs its basically debian or nothing now. X will run on just about any of them barring some models that don't have graphic support - not a speed or technical issue, mostly that the very few 68k developers left may just not have access to some machines :). As for usable speed, with a really lightweight window manager and apps that aren't resource hogs a 68030 will work. Not as quick as the MacOS they came with, but it'll work.

dana

ETHERSPIN
10th September 2005, 11:16 PM
Id love to try a distro on my imac g5,i tried it on pc back in about 1997 and not since...
but can you get any of these "live" cds for mac? i only have one partition :D

so its not any faster than os x ? ahh well.. two great OS's

mac_man_luke
10th September 2005, 11:21 PM
Ubnutu has live cds for PPC

pipsqeek
11th September 2005, 03:43 AM
Originally posted by mac_man_luke@Sep 10 2005, 11:21 PM
Ubnutu has live cds for PPC
Alot of distros are coming out with PPC builds. It's nice to see that there is enough of a demand to warranty its production.

Etherspin: There have been severely dramatic changes to Linux since then.

I first gave linux a go in 1998. I couldn't get anything to work, I didn't know anything. I hated it.

Now, I run a dedicated box, I use it daily, I practice new things I discover.

It looks something like here (http://members.westnet.com.au/bikies/dsktp.jpg).

That's CentOS, which is Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Version 4, which I've themed, modded, and hacked around with. :)

pipsqeek :thumbup:

Currawong
11th September 2005, 02:51 PM
I tried the Ubuntu PPC Live CD on my Powerbook. A full install on my PC showed up just how easy it is, as far as linux goes, to use.

The general stance of things still hasn't changed much - Debian is the all round best, if a bit fiddly to install or manage. Systems on the other end of the scale, such as Mandrake and Yellowdog might allow the use of more hardware, but aren't as fast.

Linux is a good choice for older machines where you can't run OSX, and where you want the machine to be a basic server of sorts. That being said, if you wanted to use a G5 to run a MySQL database, Linux will be considerably faster.

pipsqeek
11th September 2005, 05:36 PM
Sorry if this gets off topic... I think it is a valid question though....

I asked this on #apple, and got positive answers. But I am still not 100% happy and would like to get more opinion on the matter.

The matter: Airport cards (and Airport Extreme - I think) have Broadcom chipsets. It is well know that these chipsets are not natively supported in Linux and specifically require an NDIS wrapper in order to use the Windows drivers.

I wonder if PPC based distro's have some sort of fix, or require mucking around to get airport working?

The answers I have already received point to "yes, but with some fiddling". I just want to confirm it... I suppose I could download a PPC Live CD tonight, to try it out. But I thought this would be a genuine question to ask, and something worth documenting in this thread.

pipsqeek :thumbup:

mac_man_luke
11th September 2005, 07:55 PM
the original airport will work fine out the box, its just the extreme that has issues

Cam
11th September 2005, 08:21 PM
Originally posted by pipsqeek@Sep 11 2005, 05:36 PM
I wonder if PPC based distro's have some sort of fix, or require mucking around to get airport working?

The answers I have already received point to "yes, but with some fiddling". I just want to confirm it... I suppose I could download a PPC Live CD tonight, to try it out. But I thought this would be a genuine question to ask, and something worth documenting in this thread.

pipsqeek :thumbup:
Sorry its an absolute definite no. Two reasons.

1. The driver for the broadcom chipset is closed source. There is a project around to reverse engineer the code, however its around 25% complete.

2. Ndiswrapper uses x86 calls. It would require an emulator of some sort to emulate the x86 calls. This hasnt been done yet, and probably wont ever.

Danamania
11th September 2005, 08:58 PM
Originally posted by pipsqeek@Sep 11 2005, 05:36 PM
I wonder if PPC based distro's have some sort of fix, or require mucking around to get airport working?
Yup. Some of the gentoo people have airport extreme working now. Take a peek on the gentoo PPC forums.

It's a workaround that require Mac On Linux be installed and networking tunneled via MOL, but it works. Depending how desperate you are for airport extreme it could be worth it :).

dana

purana
11th September 2005, 09:23 PM
Ubuntu 5.1 is pretty nice. I installed it on a G3 tower for a test. And it detected the monitor and sound hardware etc perfect. Soon as it was done the machine was ready to go after logon. Very impressed.

Ubuntu rocks too, as it uses the debian package management too ;)

pipsqeek
12th September 2005, 12:05 AM
Originally posted by Cam@Sep 11 2005, 08:21 PM
Sorry its an absolute definite no. Two reasons.

1. The driver for the broadcom chipset is closed source. There is a project around to reverse engineer the code, however its around 25% complete.

2. Ndiswrapper uses x86 calls. It would require an emulator of some sort to emulate the x86 calls. This hasnt been done yet, and probably wont ever.
Thought so, just thought I'd check.

Yeah. I'm not going to try Ubuntu 5.1 until it's final release.

I currently have CentOS running on my x86 box, and its great. I might have another crack at ubuntu later.

we shall see.

pipsqeek

decryption
12th September 2005, 06:31 AM
If you want to learn something out of Linux, Gentoo is fantastic. It has excellent support for the G5 CPU as well.

I absolutley love Portage :D