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View Full Version : The best way to store grounded coffee beans?



nibbles
1st May 2010, 01:18 PM
Just bought a brand-new coffee machine for the first time and being unfamiliar with coffee we are unsure on the best way to store grounded coffee beans. Could a matalker who has any knowledge about coffee tell me what is the best way to store 1kg of pre-grounded coffee beans, I have read the freezer, the fridge, air tight and all kinds of different ways but which do you recommend

kyncaid
1st May 2010, 01:25 PM
I store mine zip-locked in the freezer

jesse
1st May 2010, 01:30 PM
I store mine zip-locked in the freezer

I use a Tupperware container in the freezer.

Cybix
1st May 2010, 02:17 PM
Coffee should never, under any circumstances be stored in a fridge or freezer.

Keep it air-tight, in your pantry/cupboard.

In fact, spend some money and buy a burr grinder, one you can use to grind freshly roasted beans, on demand, as you make your coffee. Keep the beans as above (air tight, pantry).

Sunbeam make a cost-friendly unit for under $200. (EM0480)

Pre-ground beans are stale about 5 - 10 mins after they've been ground.

When you start making fresh coffee, with freshly roasted beans, you'll kick yourself for ever drinking the other crap you were having previously. :)

snark
1st May 2010, 02:56 PM
Coffee should never, under any circumstances be stored in a fridge or freezer.

Keep it air-tight, in your pantry/cupboard.


Completely agree. I've tried keeping ground coffee in the fridge, and in the freezer, and it tastes....wrong.

I keep mine in a glass jar with a screw top lid in the pantry.

Smokebelch
1st May 2010, 03:53 PM
Buy a burr grinder - definitely don't use a spice grinder with a blade - and buy beans from a roaster. If there's no roaster close to you, check out coffeesnobs.com.au for mail order beans. I think that beans from a tin at your supermarket are as bad as ground coffee. You can't beat beans that have just been roasted. Better yet, buy a home roasting machine and buy green beans

snark
1st May 2010, 04:36 PM
Better yet, buy a home roasting machine and buy green beans

LOL - some people just love turning everyday tasks into rituals.

No offence intended justin, but do you brew your own beer as well?

nibbles
1st May 2010, 04:56 PM
I'd rather not spend 1 hour making a coffee only to enjoy for a few minutes, what about a zip lock bag in the cupboard with only a small amount in each bag to help preserve it a bit better by not allowing air to the whole lot only a little bit that i'll be using that week?

snark
1st May 2010, 05:03 PM
...what about a zip lock bag in the cupboard with only a small amount in each bag to help preserve it a bit better by not allowing air to the whole lot only a little bit that i'll be using that week?
Plastic bags are porous, not airtight, so the chemicals that make coffee so yummy are likely to evaporate before you use it.

nibbles
1st May 2010, 05:23 PM
Plastic bags are porous, not airtight, so the chemicals that make coffee so yummy are likely to evaporate before you use it.

That's nice to know, i'd better look around for some good airtight containers then

samuelowens
1st May 2010, 05:27 PM
A burr grinder will be the cheapest option in the long run because you will only use coffee when you need to. Pre-ground coffee goes stale very quickly. If you MUST use preground stuff, buy small quantities and store at room temperature to stop condensation forming when the coffee is at room temperature.

Mael
1st May 2010, 05:28 PM
I battled with keeping coffee fresh and the whole 'beans or ground' dilemma for several years and have had a number of different espresso machines.

In the end it was a case of grind only what you need for that part of the day.

After getting the shits with that after a while I turned to Nespresso and enjoyed every cuppa I have made with it AND my wife can now make her own damn cuppa instead of dragging me away from whatever I am doing.

Currawong
1st May 2010, 05:40 PM
I don't see the big deal about grinding beans, it only takes a few seconds. Five minutes to make a cup isn't an hour.

funky79
1st May 2010, 05:41 PM
I use a Tupperware container in the freezer.

+1

was how I was told to store it years ago

if not in freezer it is in the fridge

bartron
1st May 2010, 05:46 PM
I'm enjoying a nice blend 43 right now :)

However...I buy small bags of beans and they are kept in a stainless steel tin on the shelf. I have a coffee grinder that we got as a wedding present many moons ago so I just grind as I go. Early on I tried grinding a weeks worth but as has been said, ground coffee goes stale really quick...still drinkable but IMO a worse coffee than instant.

glitch
1st May 2010, 05:49 PM
In the rubbish bin. (after about 7 minutes.)

The barista's say, beans last 7 days after roasting, 7 mins after grinding and 7 secs after brewing!

glitch
1st May 2010, 05:54 PM
Interestingly it doesnt matter much with a cheap and nasty machine - it will make a drinkable coffee, consistently, with a fake crema, regardless of coffee quality. (within reason).

The better the machine, the closer to the god-shot you can get, with careful attention to the process, but the more important the choice of bean, roast profile,freshness of the coffee, size of grind, weight of coffee and pressure of tamping becomes.

My commercial machine is capable of god-shot if all of that is correct, but if the beans are too many days past roasting it will make a worse coffee than a cheap & nasty machine.

MissionMan
1st May 2010, 06:40 PM
With Cocaine. It masks the smell of the coffee :p

nibbles
1st May 2010, 06:43 PM
I intend buying small quantities after we use the 1kg bag, we only got that because that is what they gave us

EDIT: Been busy all day and was about to have a play with it now, they gave us bloody beans not pre-grounded meaning we can't use it because we don't have a grounder thingy. Grrrrrrrrr useless salesman now what!?

Dubhousing
1st May 2010, 08:22 PM
Why are you earthing them?

samuelowens
1st May 2010, 09:02 PM
I intend buying small quantities after we use the 1kg bag, we only got that because that is what they gave us

EDIT: Been busy all day and was about to have a play with it now, they gave us bloody beans not pre-grounded meaning we can't use it because we don't have a grounder thingy. Grrrrrrrrr useless salesman now what!?

Buy a grinder! (Seriously...)

nibbles
2nd May 2010, 07:33 AM
Buy a grinder! (Seriously...)

Am going to today

DJY
2nd May 2010, 08:49 AM
There is some really good advice in here...
and it also busts myths.

DON'T store coffee (especially ground coffee) in your freezer or fridge.
JUst store it in an airtight - dark - cool space.

BUY whole beans not ground beans.
GRINDERS - there are a couple of different sorts - don't buy the wrong one.

WHOLE beans that have been roasted can last longer than 7 days (to the average amateur drinkers like us).
once you find a good roaster - STICK TO IT! Don't buy from large supermarkets / chains!

forno
3rd May 2010, 08:24 AM
More myths.

Air tight is not correct either, best to have a container that lets the gases the coffee releases escape from the container, but does not allow air in.

Most beans are NOT at their best on the day of roasting, they need a few days to mellow, sometimes upto a week.

EDIT: The grind is the most important aspect to making coffee at home, so if you want to have great coffee at home, you need a good grinder.

melbmac
3rd May 2010, 09:48 AM
More myths.

Air tight is not correct either, best to have a container that lets the gases the coffee releases escape from the container, but does not allow air in.

Most beans are NOT at their best on the day of roasting, they need a few days to mellow, sometimes upto a week.

EDIT: The grind is the most important aspect to making coffee at home, so if you want to have great coffee at home, you need a good grinder.

So far the best (and only correct) advice.

There is a reason all coffee packaging except the truly nasty supermarket variety have those little breather valves on them...

Storing coffee in the freezer? Really?

Just buy what you need. The most I ever get (particularly when using it for espresso) is about a weeks worth, in bean form. Drinking good coffee is a luxury, leave bulk buy mentality for the nasty stuff like nescafe.

nibbles
3rd May 2010, 03:15 PM
So what is right and what isn't? Store it in air-tight containers or not?

gehenna
3rd May 2010, 03:17 PM
So what is right and what isn't? Store it in air-tight containers or not?

Read the last two posts, it's pretty clear to me.

snark
3rd May 2010, 06:51 PM
So far the best (and only correct) advice.

There is a reason all coffee packaging except the truly nasty supermarket variety have those little breather valves on them...
Does this apply just to packaged beans? or to ground coffee as well?

If there is one rule for coffee beans (let them breathe, but only out) and another for ground coffee (keep the aromas in), then that should be made clearer.

Note to the OP - maybe try storing your coffee a couple of different ways, and see if you can taste the difference once you've made your brew.

nibbles
3rd May 2010, 07:03 PM
Ok I get it now, must have been asleep when I read it but how do i let them breathe but only out, it may be a dead easy question but i'm still asleep?

brawlster
3rd May 2010, 08:17 PM
Better yet, buy a home roasting machine and buy green beans

Popcorn poppers are just the thing for DIY roasting coffee beans.

Ground coffee goes off very very quickly...some say within minutes. The better option is to buy roasted beans from a local supplier and grind as you require.

Roast beans should be kept in an airtight and light tight container. They should keep for about 3 weeks.

jb

Cybix
3rd May 2010, 09:40 PM
beans stay quite fresh in a dark and air tight place and are best consumed 3 or 4 days after roasting and within 3 or 4 weeks.

I suggest brewing directly after grinding. Two minutes of grinds sitting around waiting to be brewed is long enough.

Storing any kind of coffee in a fridge or freezer is an old wives tale and pretty much a sin. It's quite possible that one of the ten commandments (un-confirmed) was "thou shall not store coffee in the fridge or freezer".

If you are happy with the taste of whatever you are are already doing, then stick with it and smile. Try not to think about how much MORE AWESOME your coffee would be if:

a) it was roasted by yourself, or at least locally
b) is only 3 days to 4 weeks old from roast date
c) it was ground and consumed as you desired a coffee

If you are buying coffee that does not have a 'roasted on:' date written on the pack, you are buying the wrong coffee. Coffee's with "used by" dates mean nothing, and have probably been shipped by truck and sea through harsh and shitty conditions before arriving in a warehouse where they will be stored for 6 months before hitting supermarket shelves waiting for your purchase.

It's not hard, or expensive to enjoy brilliant coffee at home.

You don't even have to be a complete snobby prick either! :)

nibbles
4th May 2010, 02:54 PM
You don't even have to be a complete snobby prick either! :)

Most snobby pricks prefer the $2000 fully automatic ones

dotnet
4th May 2010, 03:13 PM
Popcorn poppers are just the thing for DIY roasting coffee beans.

Seriously? Tell me more please.

Cheers
Steffen.

brawlster
4th May 2010, 08:05 PM
Seriously? Tell me more please.

Cheers
Steffen.

It's not as easy as you think. But you can look here (http://www.countrybrewer.com.au/Coffee_Roasting.pdf) and here (http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1272359984)

jb

dotnet
5th May 2010, 09:25 AM
It's not as easy as you think. But you can look here (http://www.countrybrewer.com.au/Coffee_Roasting.pdf) and here (http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1272359984)


I don't think it's easy, in fact I didn't think it was practical at all. But thanks for the links. :)

Cheers
Steffen.

forno
5th May 2010, 12:40 PM
I don't think it's easy, in fact I didn't think it was practical at all. But thanks for the links. :)

Cheers
Steffen.


Apart from actualy wanting to roast coffee for the sake of hobby/interest, I dont see the need, there are enough "boutique roasters" around that you can get coffee roasted in the last few days by walking into a shop or having it arrive on your doorstep.

But hey, I piss around making bread so why not roast a few beans if you feel like it.

nibbles
5th May 2010, 08:38 PM
But hey, I piss around making bread so why not roast a few beans if you feel like it.

Exactly but I wouldn't bother, making bread is a little different and a bit easier and I might set it up friday night to have nice hot bread on saturday morning, my bread maker probably hasn't been used for over a year

forno
6th May 2010, 07:52 AM
Exactly but I wouldn't bother, making bread is a little different and a bit easier and I might set it up friday night to have nice hot bread on saturday morning, my bread maker probably hasn't been used for over a year

I find it very rewarding, not to mention tatsy. I am not sure you would get the same snese of reward doing it in a machine, might be why you dont use the bread maker?

Cybix
6th May 2010, 08:22 AM
roasting beans is fun, and certainly rewarding when you get it sussed... probably 1/4 the price of buying roasted from a specialty roaster ($10 for green beans VS $40 for roasted, as an estimate).

re: air tight. I meant containers with a vac valve or one-way valve.

I use a container with a little valve on top, it comes with a hand pump for you to pump after sealing. It holds 500gm.

I buy coffee in 500gm to 1kg lots. I use about 350gm/week on my own. I buy 1kg batches if I know I'm going to entertain. I try to never have the same batch of beans for any longer than 4 weeks, tops. I try to buy beans that are no more than 1 week old, from roasting.

After roasting, beans release CO2 for a period of time, this is de-gassing (perhaps up to 4 days), this is why the coffee shouldn't be consumed for a few days after roasting. It's also why the bags have the one-way valve on them.

As for coffee machines, those $2000 auto machines will not make as good a coffee as a $600 sunbeam EM6910 or a Silvia. They are pretty good for really busy environments though (like a work place)

Someone said the grinder was the most important part of making coffee. This is so true. I just spent $800 on a grinder. It towers over my 'cheap' espresso machine, yet I get fantastic coffee in the end :)

Grinding right is one of the most important part of getting good coffee, these other things just help it along (freshness, storing, water temp, etc)

There are so many ways to enjoy good coffee too. It's nice sometimes to just grind in to some filter paper and have a pour-over/drip coffee!

forno
6th May 2010, 08:33 AM
Spot on mate!

What grinder/machine combo do you have?

Balthazar
6th May 2010, 08:51 AM
So i love Coffee...

I have been drinking coffee since my college days, Instant for the longest time was fine by me (All they had was International Roast) but over time i have been drawn more to proper ground coffee.

I have a stove top percolator which makes excellent coffee (Much better than what you get from Gloria Jeans, Starbucks and most Cafe's) and i usually just but the pre ground lavazza coffee from the supermarket (Not super expensive but not super cheap.)

I put about three teas spoon into the filter thingy and rest it in the spout on the top part, i then boil the jug and pour the boiling water in to the bottom part. After putting it all together (With a tea-towel as it gets very hot with pre-boiled water) i put it on the stove.

Whilst this is happening i fill a coffee cup about half way with milk and microwave it for about a minute. When its done the coffee is usually ready. I put half a tea spoon of raw sugar into the milk, stir it then pour the coffee on top.

All this is done it about 5 mins (less if the jug was pre-boiled) and makes the best coffee (Steaming hot) i have ever had!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

My Brother goes through the whole roasting beans, grinding beans, uses a $3000 coffee maker with a milk boiling spout thingy.... you know, the whole 9 yards.

I asked him for a coffee the other day (As i have no idea how to work the machine) and 30 minutes later i had a cold coffee that tasted just as good as mine.



that is all.

nibbles
6th May 2010, 05:15 PM
My Brother goes through the whole roasting beans, grinding beans, uses a $3000 coffee maker with a milk boiling spout thingy.... you know, the whole 9 yards.

I asked him for a coffee the other day (As i have no idea how to work the machine) and 30 minutes later i had a cold coffee that tasted just as good as mine.

What the hell was he doing? I'm new to it and can make it quicker than that probably about 5 - 10 minutes, is it a fully automatic one because they seem to take longer than a normal machine? From not knowing much about how to make a coffee when I bought it I can say it is quite easy to use and makes a pretty good coffee for $180 and I would rather have control over it than spend more money for a computer to make me one

Cybix
6th May 2010, 06:47 PM
Spot on mate!

What grinder/machine combo do you have?

Sunbeam EM6910 espresso machine
Mazzer Mini grinder

I started with all sunbeam stuff (including EM0480 grinder) but just recently (last month) upgraded my grinder to the Mazzer. It's incredible.

Hope to upgrade my espresso machine sometime down the track, it's still making nice coffee, but there are a few things that piss me off, like the crappy steaming power and slow water tap.

Looking to upgrade to Giotto or VMB domobar, or Isomac La Mondiale, or something similar.

It takes me five minutes to make 1 or 2 coffees from start to finish, including putting the beans in the grinder, grinding, brewing, texturing milk, and cleaning all the equipment afterwards (including brushing/sweeping out the grinder).

5 mins of my time for good coffee aint bad :)

If I don't keep the area clean, my wife gets really pissed off (doesn't drink coffee, doesn't like coffee crap everywhere) hehe

kenexx
6th May 2010, 10:54 PM
I'm a bit over all the faffing about to get a cup of coffee from my Sunbeam EM6910 I'm thinking of getting rid of it and getting one of the DeLonghi
machines that use the Nespresso pods. I know I know the purists will say its not real good coffee but it will do me and has to be easier :D

dotnet
7th May 2010, 01:59 AM
I started with all sunbeam stuff (including EM0480 grinder) but just recently (last month) upgraded my grinder to the Mazzer. It's incredible.

What does the Mazzer grinder better than the EM0480, if you don't mind me asking?

Cheers
Steffen.

forno
7th May 2010, 03:03 PM
Sunbeam EM6910 espresso machine
Mazzer Mini grinder

I started with all sunbeam stuff (including EM0480 grinder) but just recently (last month) upgraded my grinder to the Mazzer. It's incredible.

Hope to upgrade my espresso machine sometime down the track, it's still making nice coffee, but there are a few things that piss me off, like the crappy steaming power and slow water tap.

Looking to upgrade to Giotto or VMB domobar, or Isomac La Mondiale, or something similar.

It takes me five minutes to make 1 or 2 coffees from start to finish, including putting the beans in the grinder, grinding, brewing, texturing milk, and cleaning all the equipment afterwards (including brushing/sweeping out the grinder).

5 mins of my time for good coffee aint bad :)

If I don't keep the area clean, my wife gets really pissed off (doesn't drink coffee, doesn't like coffee crap everywhere) hehe

Nice combo! I have a Silvia and a Compak K3, I read heaps of reviews in trying to decide between th Mazzer and the K3, most of them didnt call a clear winner so I went the $580 route instead of $7xxish

Better machine os on the cards for me at some stage too, something along the lines you are thinking

forno
7th May 2010, 03:08 PM
What does the Mazzer grinder better than the EM0480, if you don't mind me asking?

Cheers
Steffen.

Better doser, more consistant grind, more adhjustment in the grind etc etc etc. Probably grinds easier too therefore not heating the beans