PDA

View Full Version : Friday - Old Movie Night



cosmichobo
12th March 2010, 10:25 PM
Next:
6 June: Easy Rider (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0064276/)

Coming Soon:
His Girl Friday (1940) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0032599/)
The Letter (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0032701/)
On the Waterfront (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0047296/)

Previously Featured:
12 March: A Night to Remember (1958) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0051994/)
26 March: 12 Angry Men (1957) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0050083/)



the MacTalk Friday Old Movie Night

with cosmic


Eons ago some old geezer on the ABC used to host old movie night every Friday, introducing the viewer to the movie in question, providing some background and things to look out for... followed I think by a little coda, probably of him saying "See, wasn't that just great".

My concept here is, every Friday night (that I/we think of it), we all watch a chosen movie, and then come back here and review/talk about it.

Tonight, to start things off, I present to you:


http://www.maritimequest.com/liners/titanic/photos/a_night_to_remember_movie_poster.jpg

A Night to Remember, 1958, b&w, 123 minutes.

Based on the book compiled by Walter Lord:


http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~cdorman/book_website/images/Night%20to%20Remember.jpg

Now, I haven't seen this before (I think), which is odd, as I'm a bit of a Titanic buff... but I shall offer a review tomorrow...

This film is still declared the best film on the subject, bar none... The novel was researched by direct interviews with the survivors of the wreck, though I am not sure how variant the film is from those stories.

Anyone else who can lay their hands instantly on a copy, feel free to "watch with me".

tintinaujapon
12th March 2010, 10:48 PM
What was that old codger's name.

I remember they literally wheeled him in for each review. Seemed like a lovely old bloke.

Goodbye
12th March 2010, 11:14 PM
I remember him too! Clive something?

Lutze
12th March 2010, 11:24 PM
Your comment about being a Titanic buff reminded me of a picture I have...

http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/7571/p2140184orfversion2.jpg

The building that is stripy in this picture on the very far right was the head quarters of White Star lines, the owners of the Titanic. This was the skyline of Liverpool just before I left to come here. The buildings on the left are (tallest) Liver Building - if you are a LFC fan you know this!, then the Port of Liverpool building and finally the domed building is the Cunard building (collectively known as the 3 Graces.)

nevster
12th March 2010, 11:42 PM
The film critic was John Hinde ...... passed away in 2006

Goodbye
12th March 2010, 11:51 PM
That's him! He was brilliant...

3dward_Shaddow
13th March 2010, 01:26 AM
I miss the Saturday Cult movie on SBS with the dry witted guy who would introduce each film - most of which were obscure Japanese films in which he would describe the ludicrous plots with such a deadpan expression. Loved it.

cosmichobo
13th March 2010, 01:49 AM
*ahem* Oh boy - did I really just set myself up to be compared to -

Yes, the wonderful John Hinde!

http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2006/07/05/johnhinde_narrowweb__300x436,0.jpg

I do recollect now the news of his passing... and as such, I shall tribute this thread to him. To John!

(Proving he had a great sense of humour...)

http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2006/07/05/johnhinde_narrowweb__300x462,0.jpg

---

A Night to Remember (1958)

The Titanic buff in me is going to attempt to hijack this review, but in this instance, it very much is about the events that took place on that cold night in 1912, and also more recent events since 1985, that shape the modern viewing of this film.

"A Night to Remember" is, I have recently read, as close to the actual events that took place as you will ever get. James Cameron's "Titanic" may have looked more realistic, but A Night to Remember was, as mentioned, based on actual recollections, and, let's face it, was a hell of a lot closer in time to the event.

(Though yes, there have been developments since "A Night..." was made that lead to a few inconsistencies, such as the fact the ship broke up during the sinking, and the exact numbers lost.)

That said, I will take a moment to point out some of the factual errors, such as I know them, made by the film. The opening scene shows a royal figure breaking champagne across the ship's bow at its launch. This did not happen. Had they wanted to be flamboyant about the launch, they should have added a few minutes to show how the launch saw Titanic hit another vessel! The front funnel was "just for appearances" - it did not release steam/smoke. (It actually also served as a ventilator.) Later on... the lifeboats did not actually bear the name "Titanic" (as seen on at least one of the lifeboats as they rowed away from the sinking ship). And, the film gives the total number of survivors as 705. This is a commonly quoted figure, however the most accurate figures as known today are 712 survivors, with 1496 lost (2208 onboard; correctly noted).

Any movie worth its salt about Titanic needs to address at least some of the major mysteries... the "missing binoculars" (from the crow's nest), the unidentified (to this day) ship on the horizon, the attitude of the captain towards an icefield... as well as showing minor things, such as the logic behind the bulkhead doors, which helped lead to the myth of the ship's unsinkability. "A Night..." covers most of these issues fairly well, without treating the viewer like an idiot; quite refreshing considering in the same era we had Hitchcock flashing clues at his audience with dramatic zoom effects as if they were imbeciles.

As a contemporary viewer of this film - and even for the original audience to a degree - the view of the class-system is an intriguing one. The first dialogue of the movie results in a query as to whether the speaker was either a foreigner or commoner, due to the lack in national pride being shown by the speaker. The British stiff upper lip is an astounding thing. At first glance, it's hard to imagine today's world existing in such a manner, but upon second thoughts - would we call "steerage" class bogans...

It is infuriating to see the crew of the nearby vessel literally standing idly by, with their wireless operator asleep, ignoring distress flares (that were in fact the wrong colour; one mystery not covered by the film, perhaps due to the b&w medium) and totally disregarding the observation that the ship appeared to be going down at the bow. This is just one example of how this film hammers home the desperation, and uselessness that those aboard must have felt, knowing that in a very short space of time they would be without their ship in the middle of the Atlantic - they would be dead.

Here is an admission. "Titanic" makes my eyes well up with tears. There's no sobbing, there's no need even for a tissue. But yes, by the end of the film, the storytelling brings on the need for a quick wipe of the face with the back of my hand.

"A Night..." made me cry. Perhaps it's because I am a father now, but, what I think it was moreso is the fact that this film is not trying to draw you into a fictional story about two people who never existed - it draws you into the story of real people who boarded the ship, and never made it to New York. The oddest part, is that the scenes borrowed by Cameron for his film, almost line for line in some instances, had less impact on me than they do here, in a black and white film from over 50 years ago.

Whilst it is true that if two people had access to the same source material, and both people set out to make a film about those details, their stories would share a number of similarities... it is hard not to notice the scenes in "A Night..." that appear to have been remade frame for frame in "Titanic". I'm not accusing Mr Cameron of anything... (though I'm wondering now if anyone DID accuse him back in 1996) but it was ultimately a struggle for me to come to any clear conclusion ultimately on whether or not I had seen this film before, or if my "memories" of it were in fact of "Titanic"... (or purely based on my various readings of Titanic tomes)

To touch on the film's production values, seems this did set out to be a film review - aside from the occasional wobbly set (worthy of Doctor Who when it came to some of the "metal" staircases) - the sets, and even the models, felt quite fitting. There was no particularly bad acting, though equally none particularly shone, except perhaps the man who played Capt Rostron, the only real hero of the Titanic story, who evidently took the role to heart!

People regularly poo-poo black and white cinema. Indeed, yesterday when I mentioned this film to some GenYers, they said - Why would you even bother watching something in b&w? This film is one example of why we should. And I hope to bring you more such samples over the coming Friday's...


---

Next week...

Suggestions welcome...

snark
13th March 2010, 10:51 AM
John Hinde was brilliant - even when introducing the lamest B grade schlock, he would always find something good to say about it.

I'm sure I've got a VHS recording of 'Orgazmo' (feat. Trey Parker and Matt Stone of South Park fame) with his intro at the beginning

MrJesseRoss
13th March 2010, 11:04 AM
I miss the Saturday Cult movie on SBS with the dry witted guy who would introduce each film - most of which were obscure Japanese films in which he would describe the ludicrous plots with such a deadpan expression. Loved it.

Des Mangan?

macrob69
13th March 2010, 02:57 PM
Oohhh - John Hinde was excellent.

How about Bette Davis in 'The Letter (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0032701/)' for next week?

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_Qzd9HIsRWeA/R8c2TqUoPwI/AAAAAAAAGq8/VqFnMeBuA68/s400/The+Letter.jpg
http://thecineman.baywords.com/files/2009/08/bette.JPG

brawlster
13th March 2010, 03:26 PM
Well while we're visiting B+W films, and educating the Gen Y'ers how about...

"His Girl Friday" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0032599/maindetails)

Howard Hawks's 1940 comic masterpiece with the fastest on-screen delivery of dialogue you'll ever see.(hear ?).

or

"12 Angry Men" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0050083/)

Sidney Lumet's tense thriller from the inside of a deliberating jury in a murder trial where a guilty finding means the death penalty for the accused.

Both films are on IMDB's top 250 films of all time list.

jb

cosmichobo
13th March 2010, 03:43 PM
:)

Thanks for the suggestions, guys. I am hoping to do movies I haven't seen before, which I freely admit, means a lot. (Peh, some film student I was; only saw Casablanca at Uni at the age of 29!)

brawlster
13th March 2010, 03:49 PM
:)

Thanks for the suggestions, guys. I am hoping to do movies I haven't seen before, which I freely admit, means a lot. (Peh, some film student I was; only saw Casablanca at Uni at the age of 29!)

Ahh, OK.

I also only saw Casablanca recently.....shhh.

Are any of the suggestions ones you've seen ? Do you have themes or genre's you want to particularly explore ?

jb

macrob69
13th March 2010, 04:00 PM
"12 Angry Men" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0050083/)

Sidney Lumet's tense thriller from the inside of a deliberating jury in a murder trial where a guilty finding means the death penalty for the accused.

jb

I might watch this one tonight if cosmichobo has already seen...?

cosmichobo
13th March 2010, 04:10 PM
There are no particular genres/themes I'm wanting to stick to. That if anything has been my downfall - seen PLENTY of scifi, but not a lot else. I'd love to broaden my horizons, much as I did whilst at Uni.

In the interests of keeping the thread from becoming too messy, and sticking to the concept of it being a once weekly thing (even tho of course we can offer our diatribes at any time during the week), I'd like to keep to 1 film per week.

So, seems there's interest in 12 Angry Men - let's make that the film for 19 March! :) (No, I am pretty sure I haven't seen it, though it sounds intriguing!)

macrob - feel free to watch it now, and write your review, then post it here on Friday.

brawlster
13th March 2010, 04:12 PM
k.

So, seems there's interest in 12 Angry Men - let's make that the film for 19 March! :) (No, I am pretty sure I haven't seen it, though it sounds intriguing!)

macrob - feel free to watch it now, and write your review, then post it here on Friday.

Excellent idea. I might give it a rewatch. Turns it into a sort of movie club !!!

jb

nibbles
13th March 2010, 08:20 PM
Friday night is going to become HTML coding with the footy in the background for me or just the footy, Saturday is movie night for me normally and usually I watch a crime/thriller or Action. It's not old but have you seen Eric Banna's Love The Beast, it's a great movie

3dward_Shaddow
13th March 2010, 09:17 PM
Des Mangan?

Goon, I could kiss you! Do you know how long I have waited for someone to actually know who I was talking about (I've always described him as 'the guy who's mouth looks like it's caught on a fish hook!').

Man, those were the days; great films, SBS hosts introducing said films...ah, bliss! Bring Des back SBS!

SwdIPlZpD1Y

Actually turns out other people have the same idea! Bring back cult movies and Des Mangan | Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/group.php?v=info&gid=13497636620)

imacattack
14th March 2010, 12:16 AM
Goon, I could kiss you! Do you know how long I have waited for someone to actually know who I was talking about (I've always described him as 'the guy who's mouth looks like it's caught on a fish hook!').

Man, those were the days; great films, SBS hosts introducing said films...ah, bliss! Bring Des back SBS!

SwdIPlZpD1Y

Actually turns out other people have the same idea! Bring back cult movies and Des Mangan | Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/group.php?v=info&gid=13497636620)

I totally agree being that I am a film buff of the old Sci/Fi classics that I have been collecting on my HDD's.

cosmichobo
19th March 2010, 07:14 PM
LATER TONIGHT!

Tonight's Movie - 12 Angry Men (1957)

http://topper10.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/12_angry_men.jpg

Join me in watching this film (from your own home... on your own copy...) and then come and have a chat about what you thought...

gilligan911
19th March 2010, 11:40 PM
Watch this film! The best film never to win an academy award. Sidney Lumet is a genius and it is the best performance of Henry Fonda's career.

It was just bad luck the Bridge Over the River Kwai came out the same year.

cosmichobo
22nd March 2010, 10:29 PM
UPDATE

Just to let everyone know... as you may have noticed; no review of 12 Angry Men as yet. I fell asleep on Friday night before even getting to the DVD player. And then life got in the way. As I said in my intro - it may not be EVERY Friday night! :)

Hoping to get back to this movie on Friday 26 March.

cosmichobo
27th March 2010, 01:49 AM
I've just finished watching 12 Angry Men, amidst looking after a sick 2yo and sleep deprived fiancée. I'm not going to attempt my review at this point, but just wanted to get the thread active again, and encourage anyone else who's interested to watch this film. It truly is amazing.

Whilst it's fair to say of a lot of movies from the early era of film, that the timing was often slow and plodding, I didn't feel that way with this film at all. Even the fact it was b&w really made no impact on the ability to enjoy the experience.

There was a line, referring to one of the witnesses - "Nobody knows him; nobody quotes him." It reminded me of a line from the Great Gatsby - "He hadn't an enemy in the world; and none of his friends liked him." Such sad lines.

More to come...

brawlster
27th March 2010, 06:29 AM
There was a line, referring to one of the witnesses - "Nobody knows him; nobody quotes him." It reminded me of a line from the Great Gatsby - "He hadn't an enemy in the world; and none of his friends liked him." Such sad lines.



I think it's heartening to see a film like 12 Angry Men is still gripping. With Bourne as our benchmark, this film is set almost entirely in one room with 12 people talking....arguing really....and it's entirely compelling.

It's also interesting to see a film that falls squarely into the "courtroom drama" genre go nowhere near the actual courtroom. With that genre, the viewer gets a chance to see the arguments for and against, to hear the testimony. This is short-circuited in this film because you only get to hear what the jurors think.....through their own filters of bias....Each juror has their own characters that they *judge* the evidence on

This makes it impossible for us to really judge for ourselves the guilt of the defendant. We have to have faith in the system, the process of locking 12 jurors in a room. It's entirely fascinating.

jb

cosmichobo
27th March 2010, 08:30 AM
(With the thought of trying something different to a "review"... which clearly didn't inspire much conversing last time...)

Exactly! As I watched in the beginning, I wondered whether they would be using flashbacks to the court, so the audience would see what the jurors had seen... And I was pleased when they didn't! For one, it allowed more focus on the title characters, and second, it would have interrupted the drama of what was taking place in the jury room.

This film for me had a special significance. Being an Australian citizen (who was born in the 70's), I'll never know what it would feel like to have to send a man to his death... I have however been a juror on a murder trial, that sent a man to prison for life - mandatory life, til the event of his death. And what I saw, watching this film, even though it was set in a different country, and a different time, closely mimicked my experiences - in everything except the "Angry".

In my case, there was no Henry Fonda. We went around the room, after some considerable debate examining each major piece of evidence, and we were unanimous. But, and this is the scary part... if a man had done what juror #8 (Fonda) had done in my jury room... I wonder now if we also could have flopped on our original call.

"This isn't an exact science"...

tintinaujapon
27th March 2010, 09:58 AM
I remember being very impressed by an episode of Happy Days when I was very young, probably flicking on the tv after getting home from school. The Fonz was called up for jury duty in the case of a hoodlum accused of some crime of theft from an old lady or something. All the other jurors were ready to decide guilty but the Fonz held back and at the 11th hour realised that the motorbike the hoodlum was riding unusually had the throttle on the opposite side to usual, which meant that it was impossible for him to have snatched the old lady's bag and sped off in the way that he was accused of.

It was an oddly deep Happy Days and full of emotion and outbursts among the fellow jurors. Even as a kid at the time I remember thinking it was an odd episode.

Many years later when I was living in Japan and working my way through all the classic movies I'd never had time to see, I rented 12 Angry Men and realised of course that the Happy Days episode had been a blatent ripoff/homage.

cosmichobo
27th March 2010, 02:15 PM
One of the things that struck me as I watched the film, was the comparison to modern "jury" films. I actually could only readily think of one - Runaway Jury, staring John Cusack. There really are few parallels to be made however. Yes, both feature some heated discussions in the jury room, but the later film has twists, it has actual courtroom, and outside action. It has Hollywood melodrama. 12 Angry Men doesn't need to use any of those things in order to be compelling viewing.

On a quick side-note... yes, we have Henry Fonda in the lead role of Juror 8. Did anyone pick Piglet's voice as Juror #2?! And Quincy M.E., aka Oscar from the Odd Couple in chair 5!

Over on IMDB, this movie has a very high ranking. But there's a lot of people in the discussion forum saying it's boring, and barely worth a 1/10. As I noted earlier, sometimes movies/tv from the black and white, and early colour eras can be slow... I'd happily watch Jon Pertwee's era of Doctor Who at double-speed. There is some great stories, but - a modern audience would struggle to be enthralled through all 6 episodes of Planet of the Spiders.

I didn't feel that though, with this film. It did start a little slowly - but again, as mentioned, having sat in a jury room myself, I was simply enthralled to see a realistic portrayal of what happens in that room! And once the action started... the first turning point, only 12 minutes into the film... I didn't want to stop... (I had to; had a coughing kid to tend to, but still)

brawlster
8th April 2010, 09:11 PM
So is there another movie lined up cosmic ??

jb

cosmichobo
8th April 2010, 09:20 PM
So is there another movie lined up cosmic ??

jb

I've just updated the front page:
This week - His Girl Friday
Next Week - The Letter.

And, suggestions welcome for the next few weeks.

brawlster
8th April 2010, 09:29 PM
I've just updated the front page - This week - His Girl Friday.

And, suggestions welcome for the next few weeks.

Front page ?

I've already had 2 so someone else has to suggest the next ones....!

Just to prime you on His Girl Friday, it's almost a screwball comedy and I think the dialogue is crazy good, even considering it's age. Won't say too much more...wait till the other side...

jb

cosmichobo
9th April 2010, 07:01 PM
Welcome to Friday, Old Movie Night!

Tonight we will be viewing "The Letter" 1940.

Come on back and have a chat when you're finished the film...

AfterBurner_1
26th May 2010, 01:29 AM
And here we are on the 25th of May.

Firstly no stanley kubrick films this week.

What I'd actually like to suggest is The Italian Job (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Italian_Job) (1969)
http://www.imdb.com/media/rm941793024/tt0064505

The Original version of the Italian came at the end of the sixties when things weren't so hot in the British Economy. naturally being backed by a big studio meant it had some decent Talent taking in the roles.

The Film uses a song by Matt Munro during the opening credits which also features short appearances by both Rossano Brazzi (South Pacific, Three Coins in the Fountain) and Raf Vallone (the godfather Pt III, the other side of midnight) as the late Roger Beckman and local Mafia Head Altabani respectively.

this is but the start of the appearances. Micheal Caine play the lead Role of the smooth Criminal with expensive tastes, Charlie Croker, surprisingly his younger brother Stanley Caine also got a part as Coco.

Also present are the powerhouses that be Noel Coward and his life partner graham Payn plays his assistant. The ever lively Benny Hill also features as a Neurotic off-centre Professor of Computer Systems using his trademark material. Maggie Blye and Tony both put in sound performances.

"Steal $4 Million in Gold bullion in Broad daylight, and escape the Mafia"


Piece of Cake? we'll see.

Enjoy your Friday night's entertainment.

(this post will be revised soon)

PrincessHayley_xo
26th May 2010, 11:12 PM
You know what old movie I've been digging lately?

On the Waterfront

http://i49.tinypic.com/2ms1nx5.jpg

We have to watch it for year 12 english but I really love it.

cosmichobo
26th May 2010, 11:31 PM
I have to count myself out this Friday, but I'm happy for others, if they can agree on a title, to choose something and have some Friday-Movie-Night lovin. :)

cosmichobo
30th May 2010, 06:26 PM
In tribute...

Friday, 4th June will be Dennis Hopper night - with the return of Friday night movie night featuring Easy Rider.

http://coolrain44.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/easy_rider_dvd.jpg

Please duck down to your nearest DVD rental store (oh yeah or iTunes huh) and join me this Friday in watching this piece of cinema history, featuring and co written by the late Dennis Hopper.

cosmichobo
2nd June 2010, 05:12 PM
Reminder - this Friday, Easy Rider.

cosmichobo
4th June 2010, 11:27 PM
I'm blown away...

I've just finished watching this week's movie, Easy Rider (1969). I last attempted to watch this film some time during the 90's when I was a late teens, and am fairly sure I didn't get much past "Born to be Wild". Having a degree in film/tv behind me now, I can see why, and am glad that I took the time now to watch the film in full.

As noted, I chose this film as tribute to Dennis Hopper, who died this week. Last night I also paid homage, by watching another of Hopper's films - Land of the Dead. Suffice to say, though the endings for Hopper's characters have their similarities, there's little else to compare!

Even as I sat down tonight to watch the movie, I could not have told you what the film was about, what genre it was, or who was in it besides the 2 principles (had no idea about Jack). I was thus surprised and I have to say somewhat delighted to realise it's what most would call an "art" film.

My definition of an Art Film is, a film in which the scenery overrides the plot. Maybe that's pretty simplistic, but quite apt for this film. Conventional films, that the wider audience clamber to see, follow a discernible 3 act structure, as set down by Aristotle. A beginning, a middle, and an end, defined by 2 turning points - typically, the point when the hero/ine accepts their quest, and the climax to that quest.

I've known about beginnings middles ends since about Grade 3 (thanks Miss Wiltshire), but only came to understand turning points at uni (thanks Charlie Strachan). Now, when I watch a movie, I'm looking for these turning points. In the case of Easy Rider, I didn't see them, until after the closing credits! :)

I'd identify the first turning point, as being about 7 minutes into the film, when Wyatt (oh, that was his name?) takes off his watch, and he and Billy ride off on their bikes.

(more to come)