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dickg
3rd February 2010, 03:56 PM
I wouldn't pay for an ebook that I would only generally read once, but my library delivers for me (I'm housebound) and my librarian tells me they are looking at some type of Kindle ebook delivery.

Alternatively, in the way I can rent a DVD, maybe some clever marketing chappie is looking at renting ebooks.

Either/both would be a decision-maker for me.

Any insights?

dickg

toholio
4th February 2010, 12:20 PM
Any insights?

While not free you can get eBooks very cheaply if you've got a few friends you trust. My fiancée and I use a single iTunes account and Amazon account so if one of us buys something the other gets it "free".

You'll obviously need a group of friends that can be trusted for this to be a good idea. I'd suggest a pre-paid VISA card and Kindles as a way to go.

dickg
4th February 2010, 03:09 PM
Thanks toholio but my question/meanderings remain unanswered/commented on.

My thoughts are:
Has anyone thought of library loan or rental of ebooks through iPad? I can get a library book or rent a DVD physically and see no reason why I cannot do the same via download.

Just a thought, but one that is niggling me. There has to be a huge market out there.

dickg

~Coxy
4th February 2010, 04:11 PM
I doubt you'll have much luck convincing Apple and Amazon of the 'huge market'!

Content producers are very anti-library, for obvious reasons.

dickg
4th February 2010, 05:05 PM
Books need to be written, edited, typeset and the product is there electronically. Physical books then need printing, binding, warehousing, distribution, storage then sales.

E-books can cut out the second sentence, with a huge reduction in cost. Give the author the same cut and open up the market as in DVD rentals.

Apparently DVD kiosks are big in the US but not so here 'coz BigPond and Quickflix have a good business model - order online with postal delivery. No late fees; they simply send out your next choice when you return the existing loan.

Give the author a dollar or so and send an ebook out electronically with a use-by date (such as free trials for apps). Similar price to a DVD rental but no hoofing it down to the store for the buyer.

Libraries pay retail for books. No reason they can't deliver electronically rather than you picking one up.

3dward_Shaddow
4th February 2010, 06:47 PM
Libraries pay retail for books. No reason they can't deliver electronically rather than you picking one up.

You will find that there is a big 'grey' area about this as you are technical creating a 'second copy' of the material which is a big no-no in the copyright world.

There are libraries around in Australia using eBooks for loan, as well as digital movies and audio books and there are several online only eBook 'libraries' around (both free and paid).

lavo
4th February 2010, 10:36 PM
Why can't the book be rented in the same way that movies are on iTunes? After a week it just disappears. And there doesn't seem to be a printing function on the iPad, plus the screen capture would be tedious.

BeePee
5th February 2010, 07:17 AM
Iavo,

Exactly what I was going to say.

eaglesteve2
5th February 2010, 01:24 PM
Why can't the book be rented in the same way that movies are on iTunes? After a week it just disappears. And there doesn't seem to be a printing function on the iPad, plus the screen capture would be tedious.

+1 to this idea. Why make me pay for the book when, unlike music and applications, I would never read it the second time? Unlike physical books, where I can pass it around to any friends and relatives, I can't do the same with iBook, so it is incredibly expensive to buy them.

I wonder if Apple have completely realise the difference between a book and a song in the pricing model yet.

tcn33
5th February 2010, 01:38 PM
iTunes music and movies have DRM so they can't be shared around (except using Home Sharing). What makes you think Apple is going to change that stance for iBooks?

lavo
5th February 2010, 02:04 PM
+1 to this idea. Why make me pay for the book when, unlike music and applications, I would never read it the second time? Unlike physical books, where I can pass it around to any friends and relatives, I can't do the same with iBook, so it is incredibly expensive to buy them.

I wonder if Apple have completely realise the difference between a book and a song in the pricing model yet.

Somebody has to pay for the book, and its not Apple! I can see text books being a niche market for book rentals.

One other area is newspaper/magazine subscriptions. I can see Murdoch pushing Apple hard for this to be introduced ;)

Granny Mac
5th February 2010, 02:12 PM
If you do a search for Overdrive you will find they have a system in place that allows libraries to loan ebooks. I have a library card for yarra/brisbane library for exactly that purpose. Their are other libraries in Australia that do it. Usually you can sign up on line.
The selections are pretty ordinary IMO and you have to use Adobe reader, and you can't use it on portable devices like the iTouch. After 3 weeks the books are removed from your bookshelf. I use the service mainly for audiobooks as I don't like Adobe reader at all. I agree it would be great if we could loan books through iTunes, but I still prefer to get them free from the library if they would only ditch the lousy reader app