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View Full Version : I'm Going To The Dark Side



jbjose
18th August 2005, 03:03 PM
I really want the convenience of being able to draw directly onto the screen and hold it like a notebook or slate.

The problem?
- Wacom tablets are accurate but require focused coordination.
- Wacom Cintiqs (pressure-sensitive LCDs) are too expensive.
- Both of these are locked to a desk.

The answer? A Tablet Mac! Finally, Inkwell to it's full potential!

Alas, I fear that day is a loooong way away. Why hasn't Apple developed this yet? The recent rumors (cause by patent registrations for a tablet device) seem improbable; we haven't heard a word since.

I'm now tempted to go buy a Toshiba m205. Though I've only ever owned one PC (I was forced to for uni), the time has come to go to the Dark Side. Just call me Darth Tablet.

Johnny Appleseed
18th August 2005, 07:59 PM
Tablet PCs have flopped, and proven to be a niche market (obviously you fit into that niche). You can get touchscreen kits for Macs, but you can't leave it on a notebook with the lid closed.

Lucas
18th August 2005, 08:28 PM
I am a tablet buyer too. I am going to get some fujitsu model that has an outdoor screen so I can use it in my car as an entertainment and navigation aid. I use whatever tech is suited to my needs. I felt sorta guilty when buying a windows box for a media PC instead of a powermac and hacking something together but unfortunately in this case MS had out innovated Apple. ie. I love my Hewlett Packard Media Center PC, because its the best windows box I've ever used.

I would love to see Apple's take on

Mobile Phone 3G
Media Centre Mac
Tablet Mac
Palm Mac

But I will go with other companies until they bring something to market (+ it has to be better than the comp)

decryption
18th August 2005, 08:41 PM
I also went to the Dark Side ™ recently.
I sold the iBook and am just sticking with my Athlon 64 at the moment.
I was going to buy another Mac, but now I'm waiting to see what happens with this Mac OS X on x86 stuff, some very creative hacks going on there :D
Or even if Apple brings a price competitive desktop machine when they update their products with the Intel CPUs.

But hey, it's not that bad on this side of the fence, look at all the apps we can use and.. stuff.

the_OM
18th August 2005, 08:46 PM
Originally posted by decryption@Aug 18 2005, 08:41 PM
I also went to the Dark Side ™ recently.
I sold the iBook and am just sticking with my Athlon 64 at the moment.
I was going to buy another Mac, but now I'm waiting to see what happens with this Mac OS X on x86 stuff, some very creative hacks going on there :D
Or even if Apple brings a price competitive desktop machine when they update their products with the Intel CPUs.

But hey, it's not that bad on this side of the fence, look at all the apps we can use and.. stuff.
Hey Welcome back!

I too went to the darkside a few months ago with an ibm thinkpad. It's great, I love it. But I still have my powerbook for stuff, but I find I'm using my thinkpad more and more.

But once the x86 powerbooks come out, or even a slick desktop, then I'll buy my next mac..... just for dual booting, and you know it'll be the nicest look computer running windows out there too.

kit
19th August 2005, 08:39 AM
I fix PCs for a living. I don't want to be doing that when I get home too.

I think PC tablets are interesting, but not quite interesting enough to motivate me into buying one.

Would love to see how openCanvas or Alias Sketchbook runs on one though. Do they have proper pressure sensitivity? Because even most non-WACOM normal tablets don't get pressure sensitivity right (I moved from a 13x8 inch beast to a 6x4 (or so) inch WACOM just so it would feel right)

crankyfranky
19th August 2005, 09:30 AM
Actually the darkside is not too bad at all - I just got an IBM X41 and it is a little gem. Works out of the box on my airport network, it's light tough and does the job.

It's everything a powerbook should be, but is not.

Ever tried to lug a PB on an international business trip? You return with one arm looking like Arnie's.

I'm not into tablets, but the X41 tablet is probably worth a look.

gmask1
19th August 2005, 09:56 AM
Originally posted by crankyfranky@Aug 19 2005, 09:30 AM
Ever tried to lug a PB on an international business trip? You return with one arm looking like Arnie's.
Yup - it was a major pain in the butt too - I had to keep checking that it was still there. ;)

Work has supplied me with three laptops over the last few years, and the latest (a compaq nx9110) feels like carrying a desktop. The previous was an NEC, which was much lighter, but still noticibly heavier than the same sized PB.

I realise that most of the tablets out there rate about a pound or so lighter than their PB counterpart, but if that PB has your arm looking like Arnie's, you probably want to think about going to the gym a bit more! :P

Wally
19th August 2005, 10:06 AM
Originally posted by decryption@Aug 18 2005, 08:41 PM
But hey, it's not that bad on this side of the fence, look at all the apps we can use and.. stuff.
Apps?? Most of these are poorly designed visual basic applications which do the job but eventually your computer crashes or an annoying registration pops up at start up


I have to stick to windows at the moment until i get a better powerbook

some of the most annoying disadvantages are:
Viruses (Like that new one)
Spyware
Hardware Faults (Due to poor hardware builds)
and the infamous Blue Screen Of Death


I bet this is Microsofts mission.

On-Site-Tec
19th August 2005, 12:31 PM
Would the accuracy of a Tablet PC really be better than that of a Graphics Tablet?

If its anything like any phone or PDA ive used its not that crash hot. Just curious to if you would acheive a better result with a tablet PC. But i dont really know too much about the pickup of them.

Matt.

jbjose
19th August 2005, 02:30 PM
Originally posted by wally4000@Aug 19 2005, 10:06 AM
some of the most annoying disadvantages are:
Viruses (Like that new one)
Spyware
Hardware Faults (Due to poor hardware builds)
and the infamous Blue Screen Of Death
During the ~2 yrs I'd owned a desktop PC, I'd never had to install anti-virus software. Essentially, if you know what you are doing, practice common sense and are cautious of emails, I'd wager one could avoid virii and the like entirely.

(My brother got a swag of spyware installed on his comp because he didn't know what he was installing but he needed it for some P2P app and was too lazy to read it.)

Hardware faults are common because there are so many hardware manufacturers out there. Incompatibilities eventually arise. Not to mention cards that are shipped out despite adequate drivers because of fierce market competition.

Fortunately, for laptops, the manufacturer usually ensures all the parts are compatible and have adequate driver (just like Apple 'books).