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dickg
1st January 2010, 09:52 PM
I am house-bound and rely on volunteers delivering books from the library. I've read a bit about Amazon and others offering cheap ebooks (around $US10).

I would love to get books via the inevitable, in my opinion, iSlate. Rather than pay 'retail' would libraries be prepared to deliver books through the net? There would be savings for the local council and easy delivery for me.

Any thoughts?

dickg

decryption
1st January 2010, 11:09 PM
They would have to include some sort of DRM to make you return the book in time (e.g: visit a local council website and get to download a book that expires in 21 days).

I mean, if the library offered free copies of books via the Internet, why would anyone pay for it? Libraries now work because the library only has 1 or 2 (at best) copies of a book, or a limited selection of books. So people still buy books as they want to own it, or want to read it in their own time, not when the library has it back.

That all changes when digital distribution is involved and I doubt publishers and authors want to give their books away for free. It could work if the local council subsidised the cost of the sales of the books, but that would be damn expensive versus paying $20 for a paperback and letting everyone borrow it.

I don't think a digital library would work while authors can still be paid for their efforts :(

jack112006
2nd January 2010, 12:20 AM
I unfortunately have to agree with Decryption here, until Stephen king is living on the street, its not gonna happen. Whilst I am confident that iSlate will very much change the way we consume books, a digital library from your local council won't be park of it. If they were to implement it, it would plunge them into the red very, very fast. The best we can hope for at this point would be B&N nook style sharing between iSlates, which would seem likely based on Apple's recent removal of DRM from music in iTunes and the fact that they would most certainly like to replace books in as many areas as possible, sharing included.

3dward_Shaddow
2nd January 2010, 01:58 AM
Vision Australia (I believe) are using DAISY players for audio described books, some come with the option to download the file directly to the player (rather than use CDs). These come with some DRM that like Apple iTunes rentals require you to finish the book by a certain time.

The same would apply to the next gen of eBooks. It will probably be a while before you see this in most Australian public libraries though. Your best bet would be some 3rd party like Apple or Amazon stepping in creating some sort of rental system.

dickg
2nd January 2010, 06:25 PM
Interesting thoughts. Thank you.

dickg
2nd January 2010, 08:14 PM
I've been thinking ...

In every library book I get there is a purchase price and date pencilled in the fly (currently 11/09 $55.95).

Methinks it would be cheaper for my library to buy an e-version and distribute it via Kindle or iSlate with a use-by date in the manner you can trial software.

But the user base would be tiny for years and the way the library has mishandled its website since local government amalgamation makes this a very unlikely option.

Pity, as e-books would be a decision-maker for me and I don't want to buy them when the library delivers physical ones to me. (The other decision-makers would be price and screen real estate. It would have to be, and no doubt will, be much better than Kindle.)

decryption
2nd January 2010, 08:19 PM
Pity, as e-books would be a decision-maker for me and I don't want to buy them when the library delivers physical ones to me. (The other decision-makers would be price and screen real estate. It would have to be, and no doubt will, be much better than Kindle.)

The Kindle DX (http://www.amazon.com/Kindle-Wireless-Reading-Display-Generation/dp/B0015TCML0) has a 9.7" screen :)

Any sort of Apple tablet would be about the same size, probably cost a lot more and won't have the wonderful e-ink, so will be sub-par as a reading device (but will be a general use computer - something the Kindle is not - Kindle is just for books).

Either way, any option will be a shitload more expensive than free books delivered to your door via the library.

coljac
2nd January 2010, 10:14 PM
I agree with Decryption - I'm not sure I see Apple being the next big thing in reading. I'm a Kindle owner and I am totally sold on e-Ink. I'm having a harder and harder time dealing with staring at a glowing screen all day and I love to move things over to the Kindle to read. I'll be getting a DX before I get an iSlate, I reckon.

As for libraries, the publishers will never allow it. We'll have to wait til hell freezes over or a nerd gets elected Prime Minister.

SRG
2nd January 2010, 10:25 PM
before you write of iSlate (or whatever its called), you might want to listen to the last Twit. Kevin Rosa and Robert Scoble has some interesting thoughts on what it might be.

Both have been good on sources in the past. The upshot was Rose is of the view after the release there will be a flood of Kindles on the market.

I don't think whatever Apple release will be the killer but I do think it will be the game changer. Interestingly also CES is likely to preview some say up to 4 new screens to rival eink or improve on it.

dickg
19th January 2010, 05:44 PM
I've just read a review of Sony's e-reader in The Australian's IT section. It says ... 'can handle more book formats, including the free digital books offered by public libraries'.

So maybe my musings were more on the mark than some of you thought,

dickg

3dward_Shaddow
19th January 2010, 06:25 PM
This reminded me; several professional library journals have mentioned some libraries in Australia using Kindles (et. al.) for loaning ebooks.

Some are quick off the mark.

As for publishers not allowing it, Coljac, Libraries have special allowances under the current copyright act for the lending of published material.

entropy
19th January 2010, 09:18 PM
.........We'll have to wait til hell freezes over or a nerd gets elected Prime Minister.

The last fifteen years excepted, of course.

toholio
20th January 2010, 01:43 PM
Both have been good on sources in the past. The upshot was Rose is of the view after the release there will be a flood of Kindles on the market

I very much doubt this is right. I always suspect the people saying this sort of thing don't read much or have never used an eInk screen.

Apple will not be releasing a machine with an eInk display.

The supposed eInk killers all suffer the same horrible flaw as LCDs and OLEDs: they sometimes have to shine light in your eyes.

Kindles were sold to people who want to read books. This is not the same market as people who want a tablet PC. Really. It's not.