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View Full Version : Wireless Security - Where in Network do I set it and how?



DarkAvenger
30th December 2009, 10:32 PM
I'm in 'Network' under 'Airport' where it lists my 'Network Name' and 'Security' however under 'Security' it currently has 'None'. Obviously I'd like to secure my wireless network from hackers or at least deter them from hacking my network, but I can't see any drop down menu there to change the options from None to something else so how do I set security for my wireless network under OS 10.5.8 or is this something I have to do in my router's settings in which case I'll need step by step instructions for a Billion 7300g and which algorithm is the most difficult or time consuming for a hacker to crack?

ClockWork
30th December 2009, 10:46 PM
I just recently learnt how to activate WPA2 encryption myself, after some bastard stole a month's worth of d/l.

The anti-hack needs to be planted in your Billion modem, yet I don't know it's interface.

One can get into this modem interface by opening Safari or Firefox and typing the following into the address panel:

http: // 192.168.1.254

and hitting the return key.

The username and the password should both be: admin

After that, I know not, yet here is the link to my query (http://forums.mactalk.com.au/14/78334-setting-wap.html), answered most simply by Huy.

ClockWork
30th December 2009, 11:18 PM
Actually, here's the whole setup sequence (http://exewiki.exetel.com.au/index.php?title=Billion_7300_G) including WPA security, for your Billion Modem, shown visually and step by step, on a Windows box, but the graphic interface would be almost identical.

According to Huy a Dotnet though, the only difference is that TKIP should be changed to AES.

DarkAvenger
30th December 2009, 11:20 PM
I know how to access my router's settings, but I have not the foggest idea how to set security or even what I should set it to.

DarkAvenger
30th December 2009, 11:25 PM
I'll ask in the Whirlpool forums

DarkAvenger
30th December 2009, 11:26 PM
Actually, here's the whole setup sequence (http://exewiki.exetel.com.au/index.php?title=Billion_7300_G) including WPA security, for your Billion Modem, shown visually and step by step, on a Windows box, but the graphic interface would be almost identical.

According to Huy a Dotnet though, the only difference is that TKIP should be changed to AES.

You've lost me! What's WPA, TKIP and AES?

ClockWork
30th December 2009, 11:29 PM
It's all there in Post # 3 - all visual - all simple.
Can't get any simpler.

Just type: http: // 192.168.1.254 into either Safari or Firefox's Address panel and pick up on Step 3 / Image 3, in this link (http://exewiki.exetel.com.au/index.php?title=Billion_7300_G).

It shows you every step of the way without omitting a thing, in pictures.

DarkAvenger
30th December 2009, 11:42 PM
It's all there in Post # 3 - all visual - all simple.
Can't get any simpler.

Just type: http: // 192.168.1.254 into either Safari or Firefox's Address panel and pick up on Step 3 / Image 3, in this link (http://exewiki.exetel.com.au/index.php?title=Billion_7300_G).

It shows you every step of the way without omitting a thing, in pictures.

I've visited the site and then entered my router's configuration screens and went to LAN/Wireless Security and it gives me three options which are:

WPA Pre-Shared Key
WEP
WPA2 Pre-Shared Key

Now which one of these three will offer the most protection? Am I right in guessing WPA2 Pre-Shared Key is more robust than WPA Pre-Shared Key and if so what about WEP?

Now is it as simple as selecting one of these three and clicking 'Apply' and I'm done or is there more to it than that?

ClockWork
30th December 2009, 11:52 PM
Yep - select: WPA2 Pre-Shared Key.

Then change TKIP to AES - if the option is there.
If not, don't worry about it.

And then enter an alpha-numeric key of your own, as shown here (http://exewiki.exetel.com.au/images/d/d6/Billion-7300G-5.JPG), next to the WPA Shared Key.

(Write that one down so you can't forget it).

Then click the Apply button on the bottom-left. Then the blue SAVE CONFIG button on the bottom-right and finally the blue RESTART button, to the right of the SAVE CONFIG button.

And that should be that.

Wait for it to restart and then enter that alpha-numeric key you created in the WPA Shared Key panel, into the AirPort Network's Password, and you're safe.

jdagis
1st January 2010, 09:15 AM
When I set mine up with WPA2, I made the password a simple 9 character string, so that friends coming over wouldn't have to type in a couple of lines of characters to join my network.

It works fine for macs, but when a pc wants to join, typing in the simple mac string doesn't work causing exclamations like: “FUK'N MACS etc. etc.!"

After a bit of googling we found the following:

“The network password (encryption) is different for PCs than it is for Macs. Putting in the Mac password will not work for a PC. You have to have access to the mac that set the encryption.
In the Airport Admin Utility, after you have put in your WEP encryption, go to the Base Station Menu and look at the Network Equivalent Password and it will give you the PC version of that.”

The bright side was that the mac had converted my simple string into two lines of characters for the pc owner to type in...http://forums.mactalk.com.au/images/icons/icon10.gif

Philip from Australia
5th January 2010, 12:03 PM
WEP - do not use. Can be broken in like 30 seconds. Probably less by now.

WPA - better
WPA2 - Best

As for the TKIP and AES, AES is better. There is a slight weakness in the TKIP that make it able to crack some packets under obscure circumstances. So, AES is better IF YOU HAVE IT. You will only have AES under WPA2.

Select the preshared key option.

And that key should be right for any computer that connects.

Oh, go to the admin part of the router, and change the admin password for the router.

Oh, and if you like some good random strings: https://www.grc.com/passwords.htm

Philip

tsuk
7th January 2010, 06:34 PM
Alternatively, if you don't have WPA2/AES, using WPA/WPA2/TKIP is safe if your key timeout is 15 minutes or less.

The tkiptun-ng exploit that currently exists takes much longer than that, and fails to recover a key anyway, so it's not really a threat at this point in time.

Plus, you would have to running linux with the quality of service protocol to be vulnerable.

Realistically, you are perfectly safe with plain old WPA so long as you password is 8 chars or longer (using alphanum + special chars case sensitive), doesn'ty appear in literature or common speech, and a key timeout of 15 minutes.

The number of possible outcomes for a password of that length with those many characters is greater than the total number of bacterial cells on the planet earth at any one point in time. If it isn't in print, and makes no sense, no one will likely crack it in a lifetime.

WEP cracks in less than a second these days.