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hobotivo
18th December 2009, 06:28 AM
Hi folks
Please forgive the complete newbie nature of these questions, but I am a complete (mac) newbie looking to buy today! All questions refer to the entry level 21.5" iMac.

1) After initial set-up ie when in general day to day use, approximately how long to boot up to a usable state? (I find windows long boot times annoying.)

2) Can I have multiple accounts as in Windows, ie, my wife and myself have completely different and private sets of programs, files, email accounts etc?

3) I'm guessing it might be best to do the bootcamp thing following the intial bootup, before I start installing anything else. Would this be advisable or should I wait a while? Or doesn't matter?

Cheers

decryption
18th December 2009, 06:33 AM
1 - because its a new computer, it will be quick, but really, its' about the same as windows 7 these days. Don't expect instant boot up after a couple of months clogging it up with your junk.

2 - yes, you can set up user accounts

3 - if you plan to use boot camp, you can do it at any time. I would advise doing it when there's as little info on the HDD as possible, as when it re-partitions the drive to give you space for Windows, it can sometimes chuck a fit if there's not enough space or a weird file that won't budge

hobotivo
18th December 2009, 06:43 AM
Thanks for the quick answers. That's all I needed to know!
It's a Mac for me for Christmas. :)

I'm sure I'll be back qith more Q's as soon as I have it up and running.

Cheeers

Exocet
18th December 2009, 08:47 AM
As for boot-ups, if you're not overly concerned with power consumption you can just put the Mac to sleep. It will wake instantly.

hobotivo
18th December 2009, 09:07 AM
As for boot-ups, if you're not overly concerned with power consumption you can just put the Mac to sleep. It will wake instantly.

Unfortunately I have to move it to another location when I'm finished with it so that won't work for me. I will generally use it at the dining table, but my wife is "averse" to it sitting there all the time so I'll have to move it to the computer room when I've finished! I know a laptop would be arguably more suitable for this, but I like a big screen so with a laptop I'd have to move both the laptop and the big screen, so there wouldn't be an advantage really.

I don't suppose the iMac has a builtin battery or capacitor that will let it sleep for a few moments while I move it? (I very much doubt it somehow.) But boot time is not really a big deal, so long as it's not even longer than windows!

Another question has occurred to me...

My understanding is that the operating system is based on a Linux derivative? I was therefore wondering if it comes with all the things you'd expect in a "normal" Linux distro, like the GCC compiler, vi, Perl, Gimp etc pre-installed?

Cheers
Ron

Exocet
18th December 2009, 09:38 AM
There is a process called "Safe Sleep". If you select Sleep from the Apple Menu before you turn it off at the wall, it will commit the contents of the machine to memory. You can then plug it back in and start up fresh from where you were. This takes significantly more time to wake than normal sleep, but less than a cold boot (and your session is still intact).

Lutze
18th December 2009, 09:42 AM
Mac OS X is a Unix system at heart. Not linux.. but they share some commonality due to this.

No desktop Mac comes with a battery to allow moving and leaving it turned on.

Why are you moving a computer from your computer room to the dining room, just out of interest?

hobotivo
18th December 2009, 09:50 AM
There is a process called "Safe Sleep". If you select Sleep from the Apple Menu before you turn it off at the wall, it will commit the contents of the machine to memory. You can then plug it back in and start up fresh from where you were. This takes significantly more time to wake than normal sleep, but less than a cold boot (and your session is still intact).

Sounds ideal, thanks.

nibbles
18th December 2009, 10:12 AM
Will try that when i get my new iMac, how long can you leave it off for without it forgetting everything

hobotivo
18th December 2009, 10:28 AM
Mac OS X is a Unix system at heart. Not linux.. but they share some commonality due to this.

No desktop Mac comes with a battery to allow moving and leaving it turned on.

Why are you moving a computer from your computer room to the dining room, just out of interest?

Okay, I tend to use Linux and Unix somewhat interchangeably. Sorry!

I didn't really expect a battery backup, even a little one.

Fair question! On weekends my wife and I usually work together on the dining table, previously on two laptops.

She doesn't take kindly to me locking myself away in the computer room for hours on end leaving her with no one to talk to or to show her latest finds on eBay or youtube. :)

Sure, we could *both* work in the computer room (we used to in pre-WiFi days) but it's not such a pleasant environment as it's full of random junk, plus you can't keep an eye on the cooking or whatever. The dining room is just a nicer place to be!

Cheers
Ron

hobotivo
18th December 2009, 10:30 AM
Will try that when i get my new iMac, how long can you leave it off for without it forgetting everything

As a complete newbie I probably shouldn't try to answer, but my guess is that it would write a complete image of RAM to disk, so presumably indefinitely? Please correct me if I'm wrong!

~Coxy
18th December 2009, 10:44 AM
Yep, it should be indefinite. I believe you can even boot to Windows then resume back to OS X later on; at least you can on the laptops.

As for "Linux" apps, you get vi/vim, gcc, and perl all on the install disc but not GIMP. You may have to insert the DVD and choose to install the Developer Tools to get gcc and perl, though.
Apart from that you can also install MacPorts, which is a package manager for OS X.

ada_lovelace
18th December 2009, 11:06 AM
Apart from that you can also install MacPorts, which is a package manager for OS X.

Huh, I've always used Fink. Is this better?

hobotivo
18th December 2009, 11:19 AM
There is a process called "Safe Sleep". If you select Sleep from the Apple Menu before you turn it off at the wall, it will commit the contents of the machine to memory. You can then plug it back in and start up fresh from where you were. This takes significantly more time to wake than normal sleep, but less than a cold boot (and your session is still intact).

I've been reading a bit and it sounds like this is for laptop Macs only?

Can anybody confirm?

(There appear to be hacks around, but as a newbie I don't want to mess up before I know my way around the OS a little!)

Cheers
Ron

Exocet
18th December 2009, 11:26 AM
I used it with my White Intel iMac.