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Byrd
23rd January 2004, 08:06 PM
Hi,

I'm a big fan of 68K macs - still - and wondered what 68x00 based Mac are people's favourites, or even, if you have some in your collection :)

I'm still a little undecided, it's a toss-up between:

- IIfx: one of the most expensive Macs of all time, could beat later model Quadra's with a good graphics card. Very expandable, great case to work from, overclockable 030 @ 50Mhz.

- SE/30: IIx power in a compact design with inbuilt screen. Still a great server for many tasks, and has a good upgrade path.

- Quadra 840AV: Fastest 68K mac with two independant DSP chips for AV acceleration: came with filters for Photoshop acceleration. Easily the most advanced DSP from any machine during it's reign, including PCs.

For that matter, what didn't you like in the 68K range of hardware?

JB

macropus
23rd January 2004, 08:17 PM
Have a Performa 580CD with 28mb ram which I occasionaaly use, put a 4G HD in it (3 partitions) & run OS 7.6 & 8.1.
Have a LC630, currently out on loan, & until recently a Mac Classic II, sadly deceased.
:angry:

the_argon
23rd January 2004, 08:37 PM
Hmm, my favorite 68k mac's would be...

1. LC575 /w 68LC040
2. LCIII
3. Mac Classic

Mostly for sentimental reasons...

cmetom
24th January 2004, 12:49 AM
me has Mac Classic (68000?), LC630 DOS (68LC040+80486)

Byrd
25th January 2004, 12:09 AM
Of course, all those LC designated '040 models can be upgraded to full '040 CPUs (that is, with an FPU) if you can get em ...

I can't stand Mac Classics I/II's (excluding color classic), if only because they're the only ones I find in droves! You can't upgrade them (esp. the Classic II, which is half the speed of an SE/30 due to a hobbled 16-bit bus). LC I/II's I don't care much for either - but at least the RAM and VRAM can be used elsewhere, along with any PDS cards.

My main 68K 'beast' is an LC630, full 33MHz '040 overclocked to 40MHz, 132MB RAM/3GB disk, DOS compatible card with 586-160MHz CPU! Phwoar. :lol:

Also have a LC475 @ 33Mhz, 36MB/1.2GB disk. Both are great as 68K LAN machines :)

JB

cmetom
25th January 2004, 03:06 PM
well the classic was my first ever Mac. before that i'd only owned (and still do) an Apple //c.

my first two macs (the classic and the LC630) are BOTH on the top 10 worst macs of all time list (see lowendmac.com for details) !!!!! :D

stevejay
27th January 2004, 11:46 AM
I owned a 4Mb/20MbHDD Classic and loved it, it'd still do basic wordprocessing and DTP without a hitch (the guy who bought it off me for his daughter still uses it for a club newsletter)

A mac-nut friend of mine has had various SE-30s, II's and IIfx's, all of which were loved and loveable machines.

And while I grew to hate the IIvi I bought 2nd hand when I sold my Classic (mainly due to the 68k's succession to PPC), I look back fondly on the work it let me do - I published a local cycling "rides guide" on it, built Bicycle Tasmania's first website on it, and discovered the MP3 phenomenon (albeit VERY painfully) with the old bucket.

All of the above worked eminently more reliably than the succession of *hit-heap PCs my employer has inflicted on me, including the latest in the line.

jameso
29th January 2004, 02:10 PM
I tossed my last 68k mac about a week ago. so sad. if it had a real 040 chip in it i would have install and run linux but it was a quadra 605...

jameso

link

http://www.danamania.com/605/ <-- web server running from a 605 all about the 605.

Byrd
29th January 2004, 05:58 PM
Argh - do you know you can switch the LC040 with a full &#39;040 little difficulty? Mind you, my overclocked 475/605 needs a little heatsink on the CPU now, as it gets a little warm ...

JB

jameso
29th January 2004, 06:18 PM
yeah. i did. it was taking up too much room. sad but true

Byrd
31st January 2004, 10:14 AM
Well, pizza box Macs are pretty common finds out there - not the greatest loss.

Velociraptors
31st January 2004, 06:06 PM
I tossed my last 68k mac about a week ago. so sad. if it had a real 040 chip in it i would have install and run linux but it was a quadra 605...

Awww. Nicest looking 68k there is.


http://www.danamania.com/605/ <-- web server running from a 605 all about the 605.

*peeks to the right at the 6100 now running danamania.com*

Yes I&#39;m slow to update things, but it *WAS* run on a Q605 for about 18 months. Not a bad effort for the little 68k. I managed to get a bit lazy, never wrote the gallery app for showing off photos that I wanted for the site, and resorted to the gallery app (http://gallery.sourceforge.net/) already done in PHP, which isn&#39;t quite quick enough on a 68k.

Still, enough excuses from me. I like most of the 68ks, especially Quadras. I have a 630 much like bYrd above (hello btw&#33;), and it&#39;s a nifty one too. My IIci with daystar 040 in is another favourite. Just cool... =)

be well,
dana

Byrd
31st January 2004, 06:37 PM
dana - hi&#33; Hmm how did you learn about this site? :)

Velociraptors
31st January 2004, 06:44 PM
Originally posted by bYrd@Jan 31 2004, 06:37 PM
dana - hi&#33; Hmm how did you learn about this site? :)
By peeking through referrer logs of the server, and seeing links from this thread :D.

(and then I signed up when I saw... ta-dah... your post about it on 68kmla.net :)

dana

LCGuy
1st February 2004, 12:50 AM
Hmm....i&#39;m not sure really. I&#39;d have to say ALL OF THEM, but I do have a few favourites, in no particular order...

Original Macintosh: The original&#33; Plus, it was my first Apple collectors item
LCIII: My first Mac. Need I say more? ;)
LCII: First Mac I ever saw and used
LC475/Q605: Kickass power and good looks
Quadra 950: Its the Holden one tonner of computers&#33; Big. Old. Powerful. Cool. Need I say more? ;)
IIfx: Its code name says it all...WICKED FAST&#33;
Quadra 840AV: Self explanatory
SE/30: The fastest, most expandable compact Mac out there
IIci: Fast and compact, with a good upgrade path
PowerBook 550c: Do I really need to explain?
PowerBook 190cs: Poor man&#39;s PB5xx
LC/Performa/Quadra 630: Its an LC. Its extremely expandable. It looks good. It fits into your loungeroom. ;)

Cory5412
1st February 2004, 04:28 AM
My favorites are the Quadra 840av and the Mac IIsi, Iused to run A/UX on the IIsi, and do some light AV work (mostly playing video through to my AUdioVision) on the 840av. I also find that the 840av is one of the best general working computers I&#39;ve ever had, it did everything I could ever want it to. I had the old adobe acrobat pro installed and I often wrote stuff with word and pdf printed it for people to read who didn&#39;t have word (I did alot of general writing and pdfprinted it and brought it to school)

I had my 840av configured as follows
2x Apple 300i
14" Apple AudioVision™ monitor
Apple Adjustable Keyboard
64mb memory
500MB hard drive (usually)
Mac OS 8.1
AppleWorks5
Microsoft Office 4.2.1
Supra Express 56k external modem (*totally borked one of my serial ports, so nearer the end of it&#39;s life with me, it had only one serial port)

Near the end of it&#39;s lifetime, I found an ethernet transciever for it.

It died of &#39;performaspeakeritis&#39; (stupid speaker blew something on the mobo which blew something else which borked the PSU, or something....)

It often was my main machine instead of the iMac 233/32/4gb

If I had not borked it with that stupid 6200&#39;s speaker, it would to this day be within the core of my mac fleet.

stevejay
2nd February 2004, 06:58 AM
Originally posted by danamania@Jan 31 2004, 07:06 PM
*peeks to the right at the 6100 now running danamania.com*
Nice site&#33; Very clean and min.

pipsqeek
5th February 2004, 07:18 AM
I loved my LCII as this was my first mac. I could do anything with it.

I then upgraded to a Performa 5200CD and loved it more. It had a built in CD ROM drive, more CPU power, HDD and RAM. Just too boxy and big.....and beige.

But my most favorite was the LCII. Just so magical being my first PC at the age of 14.

Currently own a 900Mhz iBook.


Steve

Kreats
20th February 2004, 02:07 PM
A lot of 68k&#39;s were great in their day, but not so hot now. The ones I selected are those that are still desirable today for various reasons.

best 68k macs:

se/30 - powerful workhouse portable
colour classic - nice trinitron screen, you can use lc575 motherboard to make this into one mean portable&#33;
lc575 - nice format, coupled with decent power, upgrade to full FPU and you are set. I liked it anyway.
lc630 - IDE makes this one worth it today, fairly quick too.
q840av - As fast as it got for mac 68k.

Ive got a soft spot for my q950, but too noisy (I should replace the fan with a pabst silent fan), too slow (30 pin ram) and too heavy all count against it. A fully upgraded one would be nice however.

The champion for the moment is probably the q630, as the 840av is also noisy.

Now only if I could find a greyscale card and 8x 16mb 30 pin ram to max out my se/30&#33;

Byrd
20th February 2004, 06:27 PM
Kreats> Have a soft spot the the Q950 myself - Applebits in Oakleigh have one for &#036;20-ish, but I&#39;m put off by finding rare-as 30-pin SIMMS greater than 1MB. Along with high-capacity SCSI-2 hard disks. The only way I&#39;ve been able to beef my SE/30&#39;s RAM up to 32MB is from salvaging memory from LC/LCII&#39;s found in my local hard waste collections&#33;

Didn&#39;t know the 950 was that noisy - but then again, I&#39;ve never seen one in the flesh&#33;

Greyscale card for SE/30 - mmm :) If only a schematic was put up on the web - it doesn&#39;t look that complex a device to build.

JB

DrBoar
21st February 2004, 01:13 AM
The LC475.
I had a LCII at the time and for me that 475 was wickedly fast, way faster than my friends IIci. A powerhouse for running Marathon games in ;) The funny thing is I got one for free the other day.

Dislikes are the LCII (as slow as the LC it replaced), the IIcx and IIsi, just replacing the battery was a major operation.

24 Euro can buy me a Quadra 840AV with 40 MB RAM and 500 MB HD, perhaps I should try it out&#33;

Byrd
21st February 2004, 11:02 AM
Originally posted by DrBoar@Feb 21 2004, 01:13 AM
24 Euro can buy me a Quadra 840AV with 40 MB RAM and 500 MB HD, perhaps I should try it out&#33;
I&#39;d get it&#33; Having Apple&#39;s &#39;fastest&#39; 68K Mac of all time is always a good thing. And, it&#39;s still a capable machine for video capture, along with using it as a server (Nubus RAID cards are relatively easy to obtain on eBay).

Uses easier-to-source 72-pin RAM (I picked up quite a few 32 and 64MB SIMMs recently, whoo), has a terrible case however.

And the LCII was a terrible machine - even when it came out it was a performance dog.

JB

Byrd
21st February 2004, 11:03 AM
Forgot to say, welcome to the forums DrBoar :) where in europe are you located?

Cory5412
23rd February 2004, 10:52 PM
Oh cool, now I&#39;m not the only one who&#39;s not in Australia (that I know of) and from Europe too :D

I find that the LC II is a great mac, it might not be on top of the performance game, but it&#39;s one of the smallest modular macs ever made and it uses the least amount of power of most macs. It is still suitable for use as a telnet client or a serial terminal, light wordprocessing presentationmaking and spreadsheeting and HyperCarding even.

I also find that the IIsi, one of which I have somewhere is a great mac to me. I like it&#39;s small compact design, alot like the LCII but it can handle a bit more, including two hard drives like mine usually does have. A/UX also runs on the IIsi :)

oh, and the PRAM battery on the IIsi is one of the easiest to access of all macs--ever save for the pulldown side macs like the Blue/White G3, you just pop off the cover and it&#39;s right there for your pramtastic goodness.

LCGuy
23rd February 2004, 11:19 PM
Originally posted by Cory5412@Feb 23 2004, 10:52 PM
and it uses the least amount of power of most macs.
Actually, the LC/Performa 47x/Quadra 605 uses even less power, with their 36W power supply.

Currawong
24th February 2004, 09:33 AM
My second Mac was an LC - I can&#39;t believe I ran photoshop 2.5 on it...took about half an hour to compress a jpeg...

Then I got a Powerbook 520, which was my main machine for 5 years&#33; It ended up with 20mb ram, and a 320mb hard disk. I had to buy a SCSI zip drive when I was using it in Japan because I had 64k ISDN and kept downloading too much&#33;

When I came back, I bought a 6100, which got loaded up with goodies, but in the mean time, I bought a Quadra 900 (which I ended up giving away). I had bought it for the 1Gb hd in it, but it turned out to be a 5.25" full-height beast, which I ended up mounting in a CD-ROM external case with the top and front removed.

When the original LC failed (my father was using it at the time) we bought a second hand LC475, which was a wonderful machine. It ended up being replaced by a Quadra 650 which I was given by a customer when its HD had failed. This is the only 040 machine I have, other than a 610 which has A/UX installed.

The 650 I&#39;d have to say was the best machine of all...despite the 5 year reign of my Powerbook.

Cory5412
24th February 2004, 12:40 PM
Originally posted by LCGuy@Feb 23 2004, 11:19 PM
Actually, the LC/Performa 47x/Quadra 605 uses even less power, with their 36W power supply.
ahh, I didn&#39;tknow that. I guess I do now though ;)

What I bet would be really cool would be to have a Mac II or Quadra with the Apple Portrait display :D. This is, of course, the monitor that I was scared of a few years back for being oddly proportioned... I was also scared of vid games that use displays of this size.

I&#39;ll just have to find my way into a Mac II (maybe my own Mac IIsi) and a copy of QuarkXpress that&#39;ll run on it.

(what was the last version of XPress that&#39;d run on a 68k anyway?)

the_argon
24th February 2004, 04:28 PM
Originally posted by Cory5412@Feb 24 2004, 01:10 PM
(what was the last version of XPress that&#39;d run on a 68k anyway?)
Either 3 or 4.

I had to used XPress 4.11 on a 7100 for a while - trust me, not nice at all.

alexc
13th March 2004, 06:53 PM
Top three:

1. Quadra 700 - 25Mhz 040. I just like the case. I used one for ages and it crashed all the time. But the case was nice and simple. And it was fast. And I just liked it, OK :D

2. Quadra 650 - boy did that box seem fast. I can still remember how excited I was to be running Quark on it. It flew. That case design was around for ages.

3. SE/30 - Pretty much the first Mac I ever used. It defines the Mac experience. The pinnacle of the classic Mac shape and design. (I dont count the Classic - it was a cynical release)

oh, and one more for luck...

4. The IICX - same speed as the SE/30. It was the first Mac I used with a 21" Apple Monitor. Oh boy oh boy. How cool was I with 4 shades of grey on my screen to play with :-D

alexc.

Byrd
15th March 2004, 11:20 AM
Originally posted by alexc@Mar 13 2004, 06:53 PM
(I dont count the Classic - it was a cynical release)
The Classic I and II were both terrible machines. Obviously they were designed as a cheap entry-level Macs, but their unupgradability, slow bus, and both being a case of &#39;too little, too late&#39; when released make them one of the worst Macs of all time&#33; The most commonly thrown out Mac I&#39;ve seen in Melb. is a Classic I or II&#33;

Next 68K Mac I&#39;d love to get would be a Quadra - 700/8x0/9x0 I don&#39;t care :) Although, my LC630 is still probably a better machine for this sort of thing (cheap to upgrade, using 72-pin SIMMs and IDE hard disks, easy to overclock).

JB

PeterPE
15th March 2004, 12:25 PM
Man&#33; I spent many a happy hour on my SE/30. Still got it but it doesn&#39;t go any more because I ratted its RAM to boost that of my LaserWriter IIf which also doesn&#39;t go any more. With a RasterOps colour expansion card and an Apple 13" RGB monitor I was in heaven – the first dual screen spanned desktop setup I ever owned and it was delicious.

Later, there was the Q840AV, another delicious machine. Worked very nicely with an AppleVision 1710AV monitor. I never thought of the Quadra as noisy in fact I would have said it was very quiet for the hottest Mac at the time. This machine still goes but it has trouble with HDD "stiction".

One I had a loan of for some months while I fixed it recently was the Performer 630 DOS compatible. Quite a fun machine for fans of DOS and Win3.1 ( --&#62; me).

I have a question here. Is there a HDD currently sold that I should be looking for to suit this old Mac to match the Quadra&#39;s SCSI-2 50-pin large-format ribbon cable interface? If I had a decent sized hard disk and one that didn&#39;t fail to spin up/boot all the time, I would be really chuffed.

TJOsX
15th March 2004, 01:49 PM
These are the ones that I owned:

Mac 128k
Mac SE dual floppy
Mac SE FDHD
Mac IIcx
Mac IIsi
Powerbook Duo 230

I agree with Cory5412--the IIsi was great. At the time it was cheaper than the cheapest PC&#39;s and yet ran fast. You only paid for the pieces that you needed. I don&#39;t know if I would say it was my favorite, but I really feel it was the best value for the dollar (relative to the times) that Apple has ever put out. I really wish they would put out a similar type machine today--a sort of "much more expandable Cube."


I actually didn&#39;t get the 128k until after the SE&#39;s--it was a second Mac for my wife to use. When the 128k/Mac Plus was around I had an Apple IIe. First Mac was the dual floppy SE--and to me it was a miraculous machine.

Byrd
15th March 2004, 05:31 PM
Originally posted by PeterPE@Mar 15 2004, 12:25 PM
I have a question here. Is there a HDD currently sold that I should be looking for to suit this old Mac to match the Quadra&#39;s SCSI-2 50-pin large-format ribbon cable interface? If I had a decent sized hard disk and one that didn&#39;t fail to spin up/boot all the time, I would be really chuffed.
Hi PeterPE,

apart from looking for a second hand 50-pin SCSI drive (which are easily obtained from 4GB and below), there isn&#39;t a HD currently sold that would work on the Quadra.

However, 68-pin Ultra SCSI drives seem to be more common nowadays, and 68--&#62;50 pin HD adaptors are available (an example of an adaptor can be found here (http://www.softwareandstuff.com/h_misc_80sca50l.html)). 4 and 9GB 68-pin drives are very common and cheap out there - moreso than 50-pin models.

EDIT: changed 80pin to 50

JB

PeterPE
17th March 2004, 10:57 AM
Originally posted by bYrd@Mar 15 2004, 06:31 PM
Hi PeterPE,

apart from looking for a second hand 80-pin SCSI drive (which are easily obtained from 4GB and below), there isn&#39;t a HD currently sold that would work on the Quadra.

However, 68-pin Ultra SCSI drives seem to be more common nowadays, and 68--&#62;80 pin HD adaptors are available (an example of an adaptor can be found here (http://www.softwareandstuff.com/h_misc_80sca50l.html)). 4 and 9GB 68-pin drives are very common and cheap out there - moreso than 80-pin models.

JB
The news is not good then. I would hazzard a guess that the 2nd-hand market would be the only source of the older 50-pin SCSI hard drives. Seems like too much trouble – the old Quadra is just not worth the effort.

As an aside: The best drive I found for the Quadra, back then, was the Micropolis 1.7GHz AV unit which avoided thermal recalibration operations while data was being written or read, to minimise dropped data when dealing with video and audio. This is the drive now giving me the stiction problem. (Take it out of the computer and give it a few good whacks and it sometimes begins working again.) 1.7gigs was quite a big drive when new Macs were provided with 230MB Quantums. Of course, Quantum drives of that era where famous for stiction. The asking price for this Micropolis was one I willingly paid, wait for it... &#036;2,100 in 1995 dollars&#33;

Gothikon
24th March 2004, 08:09 PM
If you don&#39;t need that space I think I might have some Quantum 1 gig drives lying around.

68 pin SCSI drives can be bought new and a 68 -> 50 pin adaptor is cheap. However I would probably checkout your local swap meet or eBay for a real bargain.

PeterPE
8th April 2004, 09:26 AM
Rethinking...

Really, my best Mac ever would have to be my first one. My revered 68k Macintosh 128 bought new in 1984. MacPaint and MacWrite, were the only softwares written for this Mac in that first heady year. But it seems that the 128, those venerable programs, and an Apple ImageWriter was the epitome of fantastic personal computing. I loved every moment I used that machine.

A&#036;80 for a box of 10 Apple-branded 400kB floppies was a bit hard to take, though. Loved that Mac, loved it&#39;s power, loved the fact that there was nothing on this earth that matched what Apple gave us in the Macintosh 128.

PeterPE
8th April 2004, 09:50 AM
I have completed the restoration of my old Quadra840AV. It now runs a 7,200rpm Ultra SCSI (SCSI-3) 4.55GB Seagate hard disk in Fast SCSI mode. Extremely fast and extremely quiet. Now maxed out with 128MB of RAM, the 840 is a delight to use. The Quadra boots MacOS8.1 very quickly and is much faster booting than any other Mac I have ever owned and that includes my current G4s with OS9 and Pantha.

For the first time in it&#39;s life I have been able to locate and employ the correct driver to get my old Kensington ADB trackball into full operation. The trackball leaves the old tear-drop mouse out in the cold for ergonomic good design. (Apple has no idea what embodies good mouse design&#33; One button, indeed&#33; Eeyuckh.)

I have a lot of archived software to suit the Quadra, so it&#39;s not about to be made redundant any time soon. And the abandonware software sites are a godsend for these older Macs.

The Quadra840AV is a special machine and the greatest of all the 680x0 genre. To me it is a treasure.

stickman67
8th April 2004, 09:54 AM
My sentimental favourite would be my original Mac Plus, on which I spent &#036;5500 (or near enough) in the summer of 1989-90, including a 20 MB (I used to back up onto floppies&#33;) Western Digital external hard drive, an ImageWriter II dot-matrix printer, and the original version of Adobe Type Manager, which made it all very revolutionary -- my printouts looked bloody great compared to everyone else&#39;s at uni&#33; (This is when a laser printer still cost &#036;10,000-plus.)

But my hard-core, all-time favourite was the IIfx. OK, it looked just like its Mac II predecessors, but it flew like the wind. In its day it was the top predator of the personal-computer jungle, and I can even remember APC magazine raving about it.

Faster computers came along in the 680x0 line (Quadras and Centrises), but for sheer impact on the computing world (and on my work in book publishing at the time) the IIfx would be hard to beat for me. :D