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BeePee
27th September 2009, 06:06 AM
Would appreciate views on Diskwarrior, have read the speel etc, does it FIX corrupted files?
The only utility I have other than diskutil is Cocktail. Have had some drama overnight with SL (must be my turn) my limited expertise with osx has run it's course.

ClockWork
27th September 2009, 07:13 AM
No. It does not fix corrupted files.
What it does do is recover files from a damaged directory or a failing Hard Drive.
Disk Warrior brings back what you thought was lost forever.

Perfect for situations like - you start up your Apple Mac, but in never fully starts and you get a flashing question mark appear on the screen.

Best used in combination with a robust External Drive, for Disk Warrior to restore the lost directory to.

And if you want something you can run over your Apple Mac every so often to make sure it's running healthy - TechTool Pro (http://www.micromat.com/).

BeePee
27th September 2009, 09:18 AM
I had a trouble free upgrade with SL until yesterday, error message came up concerning a flash player then the fun started. It crashed.
Erased the HD thought the backup would fix it, it didn't, SL wouldn't boot properly and took forever, I thought there must be hidden files that were corrupted, erased HD again and reloaded Leopard original disks 10.5, when running I backed up over the top with my SL backup, its running ok now, am not going through this again, was at it for 18hours.
I note Tech Tools Pro5 is only up to Leopard, might hang on until the next update for SL.
I appreciate your reply.

Jaste
27th September 2009, 09:28 AM
I have used Disk Warrior a couple of times when my external WD HDD went on the fritz and the Mac wouldn't recognise it in finder but would in Disk Utility. Apart from that I haven't had much need for it - touch wood.

KaighNyne
27th September 2009, 10:10 AM
Disk Warrior is not useless by any means.

However, you have to understand that most disk utility software, and certainly the concept of user-run disk utility software in general, all started long before UNIX-like OSs had come to the fore.

Classic Mac OS needed a lot of help when it came to basic disk maintenance. I can well remember seeing Disk Warrior do stuff I'd never ever seen *any* other disk maintenance/disk utility software EVER do, and do it extremely reliably and quickly.

UNIX-class OSs (which also includes Linux) have a lot of system and disk maintenance components "built in" (so to speak) with pre-set scheduling to run them. This goes a very long way in explaining why much of the maintenance we Mac users all used to be used to doing has effectively evaporated in the presence of Mac OS X. In general, I've advised Mac users over the years who were switching from Mac OS 7 / 8 / 9 to Mac OS X not to get all wrapped up in trying to do maintenance tasks themselves (that is, going out and getting newer versions of their favorite maintenance utility and installing it, etc.) and just let Mac OS X do its job.

That being said, obviously if something happens which is beyond what Mac OS X itself can cope with, then it does behoove one to have some kind of utility software.

"That being said" being said, in the seven years I've been running Mac OS X full time, I have never once needed any of the utility software I used to swear by. I practice safe computing behavior in making sure all important user data backed up out of harm's way -- just in case -- and that's it, really. The majority of people I know who run Mac OS X (and have done for multiple years) have likewise found their regular regimen of system maintenance has become a thing of the past.

The only "utility" I've ever had occasion to fall back on -- and this was recently -- is Time Machine. Elsewhere on this board is a thread which talks about this system modifying component that gives you the classic rainbow-striped Apple in lieu of the black silhouette we have in Leopard. Well, I installed it on my Snow Leopard system and it hosed it up so thoroughly the system became unrecoverable. Safe Boot didn't even produce a workable condition.

So I booted up from my Snow Leopard DVD and told it to restore from a recent Time Machine backup. It nuked my HDD and restored it (just back a couple hours, actually). It took roughly 20 minutes to copy the data back over, and that was that. All is well. Consequentially, I cannot praise Time Machine highly enough.

I don't know if this helps the OP or anyone else here at all, but as a "sense of perspective" was requested, I have tried my best to provide one.

Good luck and Godspeed! :)

BeePee
27th September 2009, 10:44 AM
Interesting replies and food for thought. Clockwork what do you think of Drive Genius?
I am confident that my problem was corrupt hidden system files that are not copied on any backup. Attempts to restore failed. I reloaded 10.5 hoping that the system files would be restored that way and then erase and backup with SL. It worked, but I am a wreck.
There must be a way to restore hidden sys files without doing what I had to do.
1. In a past era with DOS it was SYS C and the sys files were copied, anything of the like with OSX ? or can you use a terminal command? and if so, what is it?
I am preparing my armoury in case of any further drama.

KaighNyne
27th September 2009, 11:01 AM
In a past era with DOS it was SYS C and the sys files were copied, anything of the like with OSX ? or can you use a terminal command? and if so, what is it?

Well, no, not really. sys [drive letter] made a disk bootable, but bear in mind the sort of system files you were talking about were IO.SYS, MSDOS.SYS, and COMMAND.COM, three trivially-sized files. While in theory such a function could be written for Mac OS X, we've kind of grown from three files to, well... quite a lot more than three files.

Both SuperDuper and Carbon Copy Cloner copy every single file on the source disk. If they didn't, they would be unable to produce a bootable disk product for the user.

And while Time Machine does not produce a bootable backup disk, I can speak from experience and tell you it creates a backup which can be restored, using a Leopard or Snow Leopard boot DVD, into a fully bootable disk. In fact, it saved my bacon recently.

BeePee
27th September 2009, 12:30 PM
Well the Imac has died again, got my old emac out, whatever has happened is beyond my capability at the moment.
I will order Drive Genius and give that a go or its into the Ishop.

KaighNyne
27th September 2009, 12:51 PM
BeePee:

I'm not certain of the entire pathology of your iMac issues, but if you're suffering from (and have been for any length of time) corrupted data on the HDD, you may additionally want to suspect bad RAM.

Could you put the history and symptomology of your issue here? I'll be happy to take a look at it and see if another set of eyes could be of use to you.

ClockWork
27th September 2009, 01:45 PM
Happily, I am no longer in the business.
I stopped at Mac OS 10.4.11 - yet I have a Mini running Leopard for test purposes only and I have no need to upgrade to Snow Leopard.

Every time a new OS comes out, everyone leaps to purchase it, and every time, it's a total disaster - and only becomes stable in it's mid ages - eg: Mac OS 10.5.0 should never have been released.

The thing is... I'm really not a nerd... or a geek... or even remotely interested in computers.
My primary interest was to help people solve problems.

Aside from this, I see no progress, and when one sees this - or even thinks one sees this, it's time to stop.

I'd say, roll it back to Leopard and as long as Leopard still works, wait for Mac OS 10.6.5.

BeePee
27th September 2009, 02:36 PM
Well CW and KaighNyne the issue is resolved. KN got it in one, recently I added some RAM, pulled the chips out and put the original ones back.....perfect, so I put the 6GB back in real tight and its my prized possession again.
I have ordered Drive Genius and will go ahead with that.
Years ago when I used to be alive I would have tried the RAM first, getting old pushing 70 so make allowances for my stupidity.
Thanks for responding.

BeePee
28th September 2009, 10:42 PM
Well it's all doom and gloom, booted into 64 bit (no reason) and back to 32 bit and disaster. Ran diagnostics, memory is OK have an error on the HD (4 HDD/ 11/4/0000004:SATA (0,0) and there is a file System/Library/core....as that has been modified and will not be repaired. I tried to erase the HD and restore with SuperDuper, got halfway through and SD couldn't finish, can't boot off the install disk either SL or L, can off the Backup drive.
Give Drive Genius a go when it arrives, that fails then its into the hands of the Ishop.