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View Full Version : Will CS2 run on a G4 mini? [Was: Help please b4 i purchase]



steveb151
28th August 2009, 09:25 AM
Just wondering if someone could advise me if you can run Adobe CS2 on a mac mini with the following specs

G4 1.42GHz
80GB HD
1GB RAM
Airport Wireless and Bluetooth
Leopard 10.5 installed

My wife currently does some design work from home (not alot) mainly using indesign and illustrator.

We also want to have ilife09 on it and i will buy an external 1tb hard drive for our photos and videos.

Any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

leon
28th August 2009, 09:28 AM
CS2 will run on that machine, although it may be a little pokey.
The lack of RAM upgradability beyond 1GB is what will be a stumbling block.

My wife uses CS2 on a 17" Powerbook 1.67GHz with 1GB RAM and it is O.K but she needs to only have a single CS2 app open at a time for the machine to be usable and not bog down too much. We can solve this with 2GB RAM (but you will not be able to do this with the mini).

As for running iLife '09, parts of it are non-functional on G4 PPC machines. What do you want to use within the suite?

At work I look after 2 x Mac Mini's with the specs you have listed. They have had CS3 installed on them and they perform O.K. I do find that when pushed they get a little warm, but they have given me no problems.

If you haven't purchased the Mac Mini yet, make sure you only pay around the $300 mark for one. Anything more than that, and your being taken for a ride.

steveb151
28th August 2009, 09:38 AM
She currently runs CS2 on an old desktop mac with these specs

MAC OSX Version 10.3.9
867 MHz Power PC G4
2MB L3 Cache

She does ok with that.

It will be mainly used for email, iphoto (really want 09) and imovie projects (although majority will still be done on my macbook pro.

Just so that she can have something more powerful than what she currently has without costing us an arm or a leg.

Also, how easy or difficult is it to transfer the Adobe CS2 from her current machine to the new one? She really only uses photoshop, indesign and illustrator.

Thanks for your help

leon
28th August 2009, 09:44 AM
When I transferred CS3 between machines I just deactivated it on the old machine and installed it on the new machine.

Have you thought about purchasing a G5 tower to replace the G4 that she currently has?
One of the air-cooled models? Will certainly be quicker than the Mini (RAM can also be upgraded considerably as well).
Even a G5 iMac would be sweet.

I know Designwyse Australia (http://www.designwyse.com.au) have a selection of trade in models at the moment.

If not, then the G4 mini should be a nice little upgrade for her.

Here are the iLife '09 system requirements for you to peruse.
Apple - iLife - System requirements for iLife ?09 on the Mac. (http://www.apple.com/ilife/systemrequirements.html)

arkenstone
28th August 2009, 10:23 AM
Guys,

please try to use relevant subject lines. SOmething like "Will CS2 run on a G4?" would be far better than "Help please b4 i purchase".

Thoroughly useless.

rodeodee
28th August 2009, 12:35 PM
CS2 on a g4 mini will do fine. If you want some better performance then having an external drive as a scratch disk will do wonders for photoshop. I think you'll find it quite useful. I've done heaps of work on a similar spec machine for years.

steveb151
28th August 2009, 01:15 PM
Not sure what you mean by "If you want some better performance then having an external drive as a scratch disk will do wonders for photoshop".

Thank you everyone for your advice.

In terms of ilife 09 we would probably use iweb, iphoto & imovie

leon
28th August 2009, 01:19 PM
Not sure what you mean by "If you want some better performance then having an external drive as a scratch disk will do wonders for photoshop".

Thank you everyone for your advice.

In terms of ilife 09 we would probably use iweb, iphoto & imovie

The internal drive within the Mac Mini is very slow. By having an external scratch drive, he means having photoshop using an external drive as temporary space for when the RAM runs out.

Photoshop uses space on your hard drive for its "scratch disk," a place where it stores needed data that won't fit into your computer's memory. If you move this to a dedicated drive, it will take less time to read and write from it by avoiding contention with other processes. You can change the location of Photoshop's scratch disk by going to Edit >> Preferences >> Plug-ins & Scratch Disks. By default, Photoshop will write this data to the startup drive for your operating system but this is a poor choice if you have more than one drive. The ideal location would be a drive other than where your operating system is, and other than where any large images are that you may need to edit. If you have a lot of drives, you can specify up to four for Photoshop's use.

To tell if just how much the current image is needing to use your scratch disk, you can select "Efficiency" from the pop-up menu accessed via the standard triangle icon in the lower left-hand portion of the image's border. The more this efficiency rating drops below 100%, the more often Photoshop has to rely on your scratch disk. More memory or fewer open images and other programs will let you avoid the scratch disk more often, but when you need the scratch disk you'll be glad it's on a defragmented drive that isn't heavily used for other things. "Scratch Sizes" on this same pop-up menu will show you just how much space you are currently using in RAM and your scratch disk combined. You can also change this to "Timing" to tell just how slow (or fast) your performance really is. Photoshop will update this with the time it took for each action. You can also add these to the Info Palette by using the pop-up menu triangle for it. If you can't find your Info Palette, select Window >> Info from the main Photoshop menu bar.