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Deathgod
25th August 2009, 07:51 PM
*newbie alert

Just grabbed a My Studio 1TB as a backup drive ...
anyways .. i am confused as to the best way to backup on my iMac ..

My iMac is only 3 months old, but i was thinking of backing up b4 i install the new Snow Leopard

After installing Snow Leopard will I have to re-install the iLife progs ?

or can i back them up, along with my music, movies etc and reinstall them from the new My Studio drive after I have installed Snow Leopard ?

or is it OK to just install the new Snow Leopard over the top .....

as I said .. Im a Mac newbie ....

leon
25th August 2009, 08:24 PM
Set up the WD as a Time Machine drive.
This will back up your entire iMac (Apps, pics, docs, movies, etc).

You have 2 options when SL arrives.
1) Perform an upgrade which will turn Leopard into Snow Leopard and leave all your files and applications alone.

2) Perform a clean install, which will wipe your drive and you will have to reinstall all your apps and documents. You can use migration assistant to copy your apps, documents, pictures etc from Time Machine onto your new machine.

* If you go the clean install route, make sure your backup works before erasing your primary drive. I tend to make 2 copies of my data before wiping my primary drive. I also confirm that my files actually work on my backup drives.

Deathgod
26th August 2009, 11:15 AM
is a clean install the best way to go ?
my Mac is pretty clean, i dont have much on it apart from the iLife suite, which is all up to date...

OK i just used WD Backup, the software that came with the drive
I figure that i dont need to backup as frequent as TimeMachine..

anyone have any experience/thoughts on WD Anywhere Backup ?

hmmm
i notice the Drive seems to be backing up stuff 'all the time'

can i set it up so it only backs up when i ask it too ?

or do i need to just eject it, and fire it up when i need it
thanks in advance guys

avolve
26th August 2009, 12:53 PM
Anyone have a recent comparison/overview of using Time Machine (TM) v CCC/SuperDuper. I have read a lot of contradictory comments (here and elsewhere on the intertubes) and want to ensure I am up to date on exactly what's what...

For example, I have read both that TM does and does not back-up the OS and Apps (and that you can only restore a TM back-up after installing the OS on a drive).

If the only difference between TM and CCC/Super Duper (aside from TM archiving changes to individual files) is that CCC/SuperDuper are bootable are there any other reasons to use both or is TM on its own sufficient?

If you can only restore a TM back-up after the OS is installed, would keeping a Vanilla OS clone (CCC or SuperDuper) to copy to new drives be a solid way of recovering from a failed drive. This would negate the need to have an external drive for each machine *which seems a good approach if you have multiple machines (if you can restore apps from TM)??

The Drummer
26th August 2009, 01:08 PM
Anyone have a recent comparison/overview of using Time Machine (TM) v CCC/SuperDuper. I have read a lot of contradictory comments (here and elsewhere on the intertubes) and want to ensure I am up to date on exactly what's what...

For example, I have read both that TM does and does not back-up the OS and Apps (and that you can only restore a TM back-up after installing the OS on a drive).

If the only difference between TM and CCC/Super Duper (aside from TM archiving changes to individual files) is that CCC/SuperDuper are bootable are there any other reasons to use both or is TM on its own sufficient?

If you can only restore a TM back-up after the OS is installed, would keeping a Vanilla OS clone (CCC or SuperDuper) to copy to new drives be a solid way of recovering from a failed drive. This would negate the need to have an external drive for each machine *which seems a good approach if you have multiple machines (if you can restore apps from TM)??

I know I was able to completely restore my iMac from a TimeMachine backup early this year after the original drive died. All I needed to do was start up from the iMac's startup DVD and choose an option to restore from TimeMachine backup. All worked perfectly.

Ecto1
26th August 2009, 02:21 PM
is a clean install the best way to go ?
my Mac is pretty clean, i dont have much on it apart from the iLife suite, which is all up to date...

OK i just used WD Backup, the software that came with the drive
I figure that i dont need to backup as frequent as TimeMachine..

anyone have any experience/thoughts on WD Anywhere Backup ?

hmmm
i notice the Drive seems to be backing up stuff 'all the time'

can i set it up so it only backs up when i ask it too ?

or do i need to just eject it, and fire it up when i need it
thanks in advance guys

I two was undecided if I will do a clean install, but I have decided just to upgrade. I will only do a full erase and install if something really stuffs up.

Run Time Machine. It's just a whole lot more simple, just set and forget.

Time machine will back up every hour, every day and every week till the drive is full.

I have a WD mybook set as Time Machine, and it works a treat.

gehenna
26th August 2009, 02:22 PM
I'd never do an upgrade, I always cleanly install a new OS. You're begging for a world of hurt otherwise.

dotnet
26th August 2009, 02:41 PM
For example, I have read both that TM does and does not back-up the OS and Apps (and that you can only restore a TM back-up after installing the OS on a drive).

TM will certainly backup OS and apps, but it won't create a bootable system image. Hence, in case of total disk failure you need to have some kind of working system first (however minimal, as long as it supports TM) before you can restore from the TM backup.

Cheers
Steffen.

avolve
26th August 2009, 02:51 PM
Thanks for the clarifications


TM will certainly backup OS and apps, but it won't create a bootable system image. Hence, in case of total disk failure you need to have some kind of working system first (however minimal, as long as it supports TM) before you can restore from the TM backup.

Cheers
Steffen.

Would not an OS X install disc suffice for this?

dotnet
26th August 2009, 04:25 PM
Would not an OS X install disc suffice for this?

I don't think the installer image you boot off the disc will allow you to restore from TM backup before putting a basic system on the HDD.

I'm not sure whether there is a pressing technical reason for that, or whether it's a marketing decision. Maybe that functionality is work-in-progress and will appear at some stage in the future. Like installing SL on PPC machines...

Cheers
Steffen.

avolve
27th August 2009, 09:52 AM
thx @dotnet.

I am still tossing up between:

1. CCC/SuperDuper over a network (not bootable)
2. TM over network - will limiting partition size of back-up disc to HD size make TM overwrite older files (I don't need a revision history)?

I might add a partition with a vanilla OS (one intel, one PPC) to a portable HDD for reinstall

Currawong
27th August 2009, 10:30 AM
I did a straight upgrade to Snow Leopard and there were no issues.

Here's my take: if your Leopard installation has issues, then a clean install (Archive Install) would be best. If everything has been working fine, then just upgrade.

In my case, I was having issues, specifically when logged in as my main user (but not happening logged in as another). I re-named my home Library folder and let it create a new one, afterwards dragging in preferences and Application Support stuff as I needed it. When I first tested Snow Leopard to see if upgrading was worth bothering with, I installed it clean on another drive then migrated my apps, which also migrated the preferences and settings for them. This worked very well.

Problems, if any, will most definitely be caused by 3rd party stuff installed that modifies system behaviour, eg: System Preference panes, video decoders, Input managers etc. If those are removed first, then things will be fine.