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harryb2448
18th June 2004, 08:01 AM
I read with interest forums here and other Apple sites on the advantages/disadvantages of partitioning HDD. My Apple guru advises strongly against partitioning any drive other than early model G3 machines with drives over 8 GB where it was a requirement.

His reasoning is partitioning the drive makes it work much, much harder accessing information and this may well lead to problems with the drive itself and eventual failure.

As a result have not partitioned drives. When I did use Classic - use Jaguar only on G4- installed 9.2.2 and then OS X and accessed via start up control panel or Systems Preference on X.

Would like others comments and thoughts.

Harry :)

decryption
18th June 2004, 08:38 AM
A seperate partition is good to have because, say you have a few gigabytes of data you want to keep on your drive, but need to re-install the OS, you can just wipe that partition with the OS and your data stays in tact.

cmetom
18th June 2004, 10:39 AM
Originally posted by harryb2448@Jun 18 2004, 09:01 AM
His reasoning is partitioning the drive makes it work much, much harder accessing information and this may well lead to problems with the drive itself and eventual failure.

technically, your drives are all partitioned with a single partition that is the size of the drive.

what your guy said is something i've never heard of ever. i have been partitioning and reading about it therein, for at least 7 years. on top of that, my understanding of the way hard drives work would indicate that what he said is technically impossible.

partitions, to my understanding, are logical separations of the physical disk. whether you have 1 (like most people) or more should be irrelevant. i will try and look up some info about it though.


just while we're on the topic, any ideas on partitioning an iPod? mine is FAT32 only, which can cause problems with some Mac-specific filenames/types - i thought i could make the music part 15gb and have a 5gb partition in HFS+ (or whatever it is!) for backing up / transferring mac files.

Quamen
18th June 2004, 01:03 PM
I have never heard of partitioning a drive making it work harder. I think that might just be a load of bollocks

Currawong
18th June 2004, 07:56 PM
In my G5, I partitioned the 160Gb drive into 2x 80Gb partitions. One has OSX, the second is a store for large multimedia and other files that would otherwise become severely fragmented if stored on the boot volume.

I think you get a very slight performance hit when partitioning, but it's not noticable unless you have many partitions on newer computers.

stickman67
18th June 2004, 08:17 PM
Pre OS X, I used to partition because someone told me the scratch files from Photoshop, Illustrator, and so on, were less likely to bump into VM files, temp files and the like and cause crashes.

Don't know whether it was bollocks or not, but as far as I know it never caused a problem with HD life expectancy or performance.

I now run OS X and Classic on separate partitions, and have an additional 40 GB slave drive divided into three partitions for various purposes (working, storage, and so on).

I don't seem to have any worries.

the_argon
20th June 2004, 12:50 AM
All my drives I keep as one partition.

The only advantage I can see to partitioning, like decryption said, is that if you have only one physical drive and need to keep a backup of important data you can keep in on a seperate partition. Although, this is really not the best solution because if the drive dies you are still stuffed anyway.

I guess that it would be useful to keep OS 9 and X seperate and in their own 'space.'

For running another OS it is pretty much essential.

elvis
20th June 2004, 07:38 PM
Originally posted by harryb2448@Jun 18 2004, 08:01 AM
My Apple guru advises strongly against partitioning any drive other than early model G3 machines with drives over 8 GB where it was a requirement.

His reasoning is partitioning the drive makes it work much, much harder accessing information and this may well lead to problems with the drive itself and eventual failure.
No offense intended, but your "guru" is speaking through his hat (to put it politely).

Drive partitioning places no extra stress on the physical drive. The drive platters still spin at the same RPM, and the drive head still travels all over the physical disk just the same. It doesn't magically double the work-load on the physical drive mechanism or any similarly rediculous idea like that.

As mentioned, the single biggest reason for drive partitioning is ease of system rebuilding. If for any reason your MacOSX install blows up (from a software-related fault - say a bad patch or you configured something screwey) a reinstall with multiple partitions means you can easily format your main MacOSX partition, and still have all of your data, files, information, songs, downloads, etc, etc happily living on a separate partition, untouched.

Partitioning a multi-user system is also an easy way of hard-setting the disk-space limits for users. You would never put user files on the same partition as the system files in a mutli-user setup, in case some fool decided to fill the drive with rubbish and destroy your ability to write logs, create new PID and lock files, etc, etc.

Also as mentioned, there is no "need" to partition a single-user system these days. If your backup regime is tight enough, you should be able to recover happily from even a serious hardware fault.

With partitioning, asking two different people will give you three different answers. Everyone has their own system(s) from experience. If you're happy with your setup, then don't bother with it.

cmetom
21st June 2004, 12:29 AM
Originally posted by the_argon@Jun 20 2004, 01:50 AM
The only advantage I can see to partitioning, like decryption said, is that if you have only one physical drive and need to keep a backup of important data you can keep in on a seperate partition. Although, this is really not the best solution because if the drive dies you are still stuffed anyway.
well the problem isn't the drive dying - it's the OS!!

ignoring macs, cause i've never had my PowerMacs die in the OS ever, my PC windows is installed on a separate partition of my primary drive, so i can format and reinstall anytime it's necessary, without losing all the stuff on the rest of that drive... it's a 40Gb and i give 10Gb to windows 2000 and the rest to some data - mostly game installs actually!! but yeah,

my second drive, an 80, did something weird when i first got it and formatted it. the filesystem took something like 2Gb for the partition table. i dunno why, cause when i made it two 40Gb partitions, it only took 50Mb or something, per part, for the tables.

my third drive is a 160Gb, and it's just the one partition. no over-use of table space or anything. btw, these are all NTFS structure.

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so that's why i've partitioned.

on the iPod thing, i briefly read that it won't let it work properly as an MP3 player anymore and a "Restore to factory default settings" erase is necessary using that update/restore software from Apple.
when i make sure there's no music on the 'Pod that's not on my computer, I'll go for it and see what happens :D