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View Full Version : so i forgot to buy applecare (mbp early 2008)



insular
1st June 2009, 10:51 PM
somehow i got it in my head i had until june/july to buy it, and just recently checked with the online thingo and got the bad news.

checked my invoice and noticed i actually bought my mbp in early april.

what are my chances of sweet talking apple into letting me register if i buy?

heard its possible if you're a few days over, but 2 months?

already had a logic board replaced and used to get the nvidia chip problem, have problems on boot where i have to disconnect all peripherals for it to actually boot, and even then it takes ages to go from grey screen after the gong to apple logo (FS issue?)

pretty annoyed now as if i get any hardware issue im screwed as far as repairs go, i also believe NB did a shithouse job in replacing the logic board, CPU runs at 75deg even in winter! never ran that hot before logicb replacement.

Beau
1st June 2009, 10:56 PM
Unless you're extremely lucky, no, they won't let you register AppleCare. However, if your MacBook is one of the shoddy Nvidia GPU affected units, they've extended warranties for up to three years, so if that breaks, Apple should cover it.
AppleInsider | Apple extends old MacBook Pro graphics warranty to three years (http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/09/05/30/apple_extends_old_macbook_pro_graphics_warranty_to _three_years.html)

Sebastianmonty
2nd June 2009, 12:32 AM
Yes, I doubt they will activate an APP. EVERYONE MAKE SURE THEY HAVE THEIR APP ACTIVATED. I don't but I have until July for MacBook and October for iMac...or do I??

decryption
2nd June 2009, 06:19 AM
You snooze - you lose :(

arkenstone
2nd June 2009, 08:06 AM
Optional Extended warranties should be illegal. Disgusting practice, IMHO.

Geoff3DMN
2nd June 2009, 08:16 AM
Optional Extended warranties should be illegal. Disgusting practice, IMHO.

Many people only keep a laptop for a year and roll it over at the end of that period.

If a 3 year warranty was standard then the base cost of the laptop would be higher (to pay for that warranty cost) which means that people with quicker turnover would be subsidizing those who chose to keep their equipment longer.

The way it is at the moment people have a choice and if you choose to keep your equipment longer and you want a warranty you pay that cost (and not the people who no longer even have the equipment).

Laptops aren't a social service with universal obligation where everyone should 'get a fair go', they are (depending upon use) either a business tool or a teaching tool or a luxury (home users can use cheaper desktop machines if they have $ issues).

decryption
2nd June 2009, 08:39 AM
Optional Extended warranties should be illegal. Disgusting practice, IMHO.

I see no reason why people can't pay for an extra warranty if they want one?

Perhaps the de-facto 12 month warranty should be bumped to 3 years instead. Be prepared to pay more for your gear to cover this fact though.

arkenstone
2nd June 2009, 08:39 AM
I see your point, I just find it somewhat offensive that the faith a manufacturer puts in the robustness of their product is directly proportional to how much I pay.

decryption
2nd June 2009, 08:41 AM
I see your point, I just find it somewhat offensive that the faith a manufacturer puts in the robustness of their product is directly proportional to how much I pay.

Well - cheap crappy products = cheap to make which are cheap to sell. High quality, long lasting products cost more to make, which cost more to sell. Pay more = better product.

It's not always true, but for general manufacturing quality, if you go for the lowest bidder, chances are it will be of the lowest quality. Technological advances mean that manufacturing quality can increase while the price is low, but there will always be shortcuts or lower-grade materials that lower the price.

Goldilocks
2nd June 2009, 10:06 AM
I have an iPod classic 160Gb at the time I realised I was 10 days out of warranty (still within the month), no issues but wanted to extend the warranty - $89 but no sweet talk or reasoning would get Apple to budge. I thought just the fact of me parting with the hard earned dough to their hot hands would be just enough to sway them but alas NO!! :sad: BTW The iPod is still going sweet - fortunately. :cool:

The_Hawk
2nd June 2009, 10:40 AM
Statutory warranty is 12 months, although lots of things sell with a 2, 3, 5 or even 10 year warranty depending on what the manufacturer wants to offer.

There is no reason why Apple couldn't make the "standard" 2 or 3 years, but as has been said, it would add to the cost of the unit itself (unless they felt the need to be really nice to everyone).

arkenstone
2nd June 2009, 11:21 AM
Well - cheap crappy products = cheap to make which are cheap to sell. High quality, long lasting products cost more to make, which cost more to sell. Pay more = better product.

Aha! But it's the exact same product!

Further more, If 11 months down the line I decide I want my laptop to last another two years I can pay then. It's bizarre.

Ozi
3rd June 2009, 02:16 PM
I see your point, I just find it somewhat offensive that the faith a manufacturer puts in the robustness of their product is directly proportional to how much I pay.

It's not just the parts of the product manufactured by Apple which can fail, though; Apple sources a large number of parts (Capacitors, RAM, Numerous items of circuitry, Hard Disks et.al.) from other manufacturers. As seen with the G5 iMacs, dodgy Caps can rear their ugly heads down the track, and that was an issue caused by the Taiwanese manufacturer IIRC. Likewise with the expanding batteries on the Powerbooks.

Apple can restore customer faith in it's products by offering extended warranties on parts which have widespread failure, but for isolated issues of hardware failure you are always better to have APP to back you up.

peterjcat
9th June 2009, 05:55 PM
Statutory warranty is 12 months, although lots of things sell with a 2, 3, 5 or even 10 year warranty depending on what the manufacturer wants to offer.

There is no reason why Apple couldn't make the "standard" 2 or 3 years, but as has been said, it would add to the cost of the unit itself (unless they felt the need to be really nice to everyone).

Statutory warranty isn't 12 months. Here in Australia there is a term implied in every contract of sale that the goods are of merchantable quality and are fit for purpose. If your computer is DOA that's a clear breach of the implied term. If it breaks down after a year it's not so clear, but there's a decent enough argument that a $3000 computer should last more than a year (and maybe even three) under normal use.

The thing I don't like about extended warranties of any kind is that they make consumers believe that they only have a remedy if they buy the extended warranty. They're saying, "If you pay this money now, we'll do what we're probably legally obliged to do anyway without you having to take us to court. If you don't pay the money, we won't even consider what our actual obligations are, because we know you can't afford to sue us."

Like everybody else I can't really afford to sue Apple or my local reseller either, so I know extended warranties can be useful (though they're not always good value), but they do have an unfortunate effect on consumer expectations and I think people should be aware of what the real obligations are, just in case they want to investigate the Small Claims Court or even write letters/make phone calls in the knowledge that they have more rights than are written down.

djsherly
10th June 2009, 11:08 PM
Statutory warranty isn't 12 months. Here in Australia there is a term implied in every contract of sale that the goods are of merchantable quality and are fit for purpose. If your computer is DOA that's a clear breach of the implied term. If it breaks down after a year it's not so clear, but there's a decent enough argument that a $3000 computer should last more than a year (and maybe even three) under normal use.

The thing I don't like about extended warranties of any kind is that they make consumers believe that they only have a remedy if they buy the extended warranty. They're saying, "If you pay this money now, we'll do what we're probably legally obliged to do anyway without you having to take us to court. If you don't pay the money, we won't even consider what our actual obligations are, because we know you can't afford to sue us."

Like everybody else I can't really afford to sue Apple or my local reseller either, so I know extended warranties can be useful (though they're not always good value), but they do have an unfortunate effect on consumer expectations and I think people should be aware of what the real obligations are, just in case they want to investigate the Small Claims Court or even write letters/make phone calls in the knowledge that they have more rights than are written down.

Appreciate your common sense and apparent understanding of the law. Despite everything, no company can take away what are your statutory rights. I have no idea whether plonking $3k on a computer should bring with an expectation it should last for more than 12 months, but I would err more on the side of yes, than no.

sanjay
11th June 2009, 01:09 AM
Aha! But it's the exact same product!

Further more, If 11 months down the line I decide I want my laptop to last another two years I can pay then. It's bizarre.

i agree entirely.

ASUS offers 2 years warranty on all their laptops (apart from their eee range) - why cant apple? its not like people are getting a bargain when they buy an apple product (unless youre one of the lucky sons of bitches who got the $2149 refurb macbook pro :p)