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tintinaujapon
6th March 2009, 07:38 PM
No, not Conroy's thing.

A friend is finally getting onto broadband.

He has two lovely little kids, the eldest of which needs to do her maths homework online, apparently.

He's desperately concerned about their being exposed to some of the dodgy stuff on the net and has asked me what to do about it.

I looked at the filter in Safari but that seems to let you only allow a specified set of sites, rather than letting you see everything you choose to with the exclusion of the dodgy stuff.

Can the MacTalk brain recommend a good solution to the problem?

B

bullrout
6th March 2009, 07:53 PM
Tell the kids what not to do and trust them.

Phase
6th March 2009, 08:04 PM
Can the MacTalk brain recommend a good solution to the problem?



Parental supervision.

PatrickH
6th March 2009, 08:11 PM
Can the MacTalk brain recommend a good solution to the problem?

B

I think this should be sufficient for his needs:

K9 Web Protection - Free Internet Filtering and Parental Controls Software (http://www.k9webprotection.com/)

It's free, has Mac support and is pretty simple. I recommened it to one of my friends for their younger siblings a few months ago and hasn't had any issues with it.

tintinaujapon
6th March 2009, 08:13 PM
The kids are, like 4 and 7.

The problem is not the danger of what they may look for in intentional waywardness.

The danger is what they will come across accidentally.


Edit: Thanks for that PatrickH. I'll check that out.

Granny Mac
6th March 2009, 09:14 PM
Depends what broadband company, Optus has a filter, though I don't think we ever used it. Google has safe search.
It's actually pretty hard to stumble on to sites not suitable for kids, unless you go looking.
Up until my daughter was about 14 we had the family computer in the living room. There was little chance of inappropriate sites because we were always their or passing through. Nothing beats supervision.
Youngest daughter has been on the computer since she was 2 or 3 (on a 286, remember them). Plus she new what was allowed, and we explained about not everyone being as they seemed. It's just reinforcing the same message about stranger danger they get in school etc.
Filters create a false sense of security, I don't like them personally.

melbmac
6th March 2009, 10:07 PM
Put the computer in a main room and watch them.

jonargall
6th March 2009, 10:51 PM
No, not Conroy's thing.
I looked at the filter in Safari but that seems to let you only allow a specified set of sites, rather than letting you see everything you choose to with the exclusion of the dodgy stuff.
Actually I think that the "whitelist" approach (as in Safari) is the only safe way of allowing the kids to use the internet without constant supervision. I would only turn the whitelist off if I were actually sitting with my kids at the computer. Obviously this requires that your friend spend some time first looking for a variety of fun-ducational websites to put on the whitelist but even one kiddie website can have a great variety of activities on it.

When you think about all the words we use everyday that have double meanings, I definitely think it makes it unwise to allow kids unsupervised access to a search engine. Imagine some poor kids wants to find pictures of a pussy cat, for example. It's sadly too easy for them to end up in the wrong place.

Mac Ram
6th March 2009, 10:59 PM
Have you tried the parental controls built into OSX?

automan
6th March 2009, 11:09 PM
This is also worth looking at as well. A few people I know run it and have been very happy with it. Intego make some pretty good products.
Should be able to get it from most Mac places, or they can order it from PICA.

http://www.pica.com.au/Software/utilities/cbarrier.htm

Hope that helps.

--Daniel

TheWatchman
6th March 2009, 11:19 PM
I've never run into porn "by accident". It doesn't happen if you are browsing innocent things like Apple rumour sites, news sites and gaming sites :P

iJordie
7th March 2009, 12:20 AM
Doesn't the government provide a disk to families for free. With the name "My Child My Values" Not sure if it has a mac version though.

kyte
7th March 2009, 12:34 AM
Parental supervision.

No substitute for it. No filter can do what a parent does. The additional benefit of this is if something does get stumbled on, theres a parent nearby to explain why its bad. etc.

LCGuy
7th March 2009, 12:44 AM
The best filter is the one where you only allow them to go online when you can sit down with them and watch what they do. Free, too :)

tintinaujapon
7th March 2009, 09:44 AM
Have you tried the parental controls built into OSX?

I'm still running Tiger at my place, and all I can find is the 'whitelist' approach in Safari itself.


This is also worth looking at as well. A few people I know run it and have been very happy with it. Intego make some pretty good products.
Should be able to get it from most Mac places, or they can order it from PICA.

Welcome to PICA Australia (http://www.pica.com.au/Software/utilities/cbarrier.htm)

Hope that helps.

--Daniel

That looks pretty comprehensive.


Doesn't the government provide a disk to families for free. With the name "My Child My Values" Not sure if it has a mac version though.

I don't know if there wsa ever a Mac version, but in any case the free software offer ended last year.


The best filter is the one where you only allow them to go online when you can sit down with them and watch what they do. Free, too :)

True. The friend has asked me to look into a filter thing though, so....

Mac Ram
7th March 2009, 10:04 AM
Parental controls must be Leopard only, sorry didn't realise. Is your friend tiger also?

tintinaujapon
7th March 2009, 10:23 AM
Yes, on an old swing-arm Mac.

plod2
7th March 2009, 11:15 AM
open dns (http://www.opendns.com/), have a read and its free. Works a charm

tintinaujapon
8th March 2009, 11:35 PM
I got the friend online with broadband today by using one of Decryption's old cast off modems he gave to us for free.

For the time being, the friend is using the free K9 filter which looked OK. If he finds that doesn't fit the bill, I'll set him up on OpenDNS which looks even better.

Thanks for the suggestions and advice. And personally, I agree that parental supervision is the best solution, yes.

banjo
10th March 2009, 06:50 PM
I don't think I've accidentally stumbled upon porn or anything "dodgy" in many years.

As one means of protection you could go to Google, select "preferences" beside the search box, and enable "strict" filtering. Also there is a version of NetNanny for Mac.

However no software will protect your children from everything (especially where social networking -- Facebook, IM, etc. -- is concerned). Nothing works better than parental supervision (as you know). You wouldn't let your kids wander the streets unsupervised in an unfamiliar neighbourhood, and I don't see the Internet as much different: you never know what they could see, or who they'll come in contact with.