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little_yoharn
2nd February 2009, 08:43 AM
Hello all,
After years of dial up I now have ADSL at home. Which leads me to a problem with the kids, they never went on line because it was so slow, now is a different story. I would like to keep it safe for them to search the net but are un sure if I need a program or if I can do the safety set up on the mac. running 10.3 on a power mac.

alan7948
2nd February 2009, 09:01 AM
Hello all,
After years of dial up I now have ADSL at home. Which leads me to a problem with the kids, they never went on line because it was so slow, now is a different story. I would like to keep it safe for them to search the net but are un sure if I need a program or if I can do the safety set up on the mac. running 10.3 on a power mac.

just try and put the computer in a place where you can constantly monitor them or use software like netnanny. (There is a lot of other software out there so dont just take my advice)

arkenstone
2nd February 2009, 09:22 AM
Lucky for you, Yoharn, the federal government is slowing down the country's internet access and blocking a shitload of legitimate sites in order to develop a filter like you ask at the ISP (internet service provider)'s end.

My cynicism aside, check out software like Net Nanny and supervise your arse off :)

geektechnu
2nd February 2009, 09:23 AM
If you want to try a free solution, OpenDNS can be used to filter your connection:

OpenDNS > Home Network > Solutions > Parental Controls (http://www.opendns.com/homenetwork/solutions/parental/)

It can be set up per-machine, or directly in your modem router.

tcn33
2nd February 2009, 09:38 AM
If you want to try a free solution, OpenDNS can be used to filter your connection:

OpenDNS > Home Network > Solutions > Parental Controls (http://www.opendns.com/homenetwork/solutions/parental/)

It can be set up per-machine, or directly in your modem router.
Just be aware that changing your DNS can result in the loss of unmetered content allowance from your ISP (e.g iiNet's free iTunes downloads).

griffmiester
2nd February 2009, 09:42 AM
Hello all,
After years of dial up I now have ADSL at home. Which leads me to a problem with the kids, they never went on line because it was so slow, now is a different story. I would like to keep it safe for them to search the net but are un sure if I need a program or if I can do the safety set up on the mac. running 10.3 on a power mac.

Another suggestion, other than Net Nanny (which has always been a resource hog on PC's) is Safe Eyes - Parental Control Software from Internet Safety (http://www.internetsafety.com/safe-eyes-parental-control-software.php)
Until the end of 2008 there was actually a deal where the Government Subsidised the cost of Safe Eyes, and it meant that you could get it for free. It now costs US$49.95 for a year.

It has both a Mac and PC version. It's supposed to be good (I haven't used it myself, but I've installed it on a couple of machines).

Hope that helps.

Cods
2nd February 2009, 09:42 AM
Whilst it'll be a little while until my kids are old enough to muck around on the internet, I've been keeping this topic in mind for a while.

About the only consensus that I can see on the subject is pretty much what alan7948 already said: Put the computer that the kids use to access the internet in a public part of the house, and actively supervise them while they use it.

Skip the next bit if you're not interested in the details.
Suffice to say that it looks to me like ANY NetNanny software will get you a combination of a) blocking quite a few things that don't need blocking (false positives) and b) letting through quite a lot of stuff that should be blocked (false negatives).
A good primer on why NetNanny-type programs aren't much good (at least in Dan's considered opinion) can be found at DansData.com - in a reply to a letter (http://www.dansdata.com/danletters203.htm) about the current silliness by Senator Conroy (http://nocleanfeed.com/) et al which references a couple (http://www.dansdata.com/censorware.htm) of Dans old articles (http://www.dansdata.com/pornsweeper.htm).

Perhaps someone who uses this type of software might be able to comment from experience (I can't).

I just took a look at Leopard's Parental Controls (http://www.apple.com/macosx/features/parentalcontrols.html), and perhaps they may be of help (sorry, I don't have 10.3).
Leopard will let you set up special controls on an account that:
+ limit what programs the account can use (so, say, no iChat or IM).
+ limit access to specific websites only (ones that you choose - perhaps TotLoL (http://www.totlol.com/), but not YouTube).
+ limit who they can exchange email with (just addresses you specify) or chat with (just who you specify).
+ allows you to set time limits on usage.
+ allows you to ensure a complete log id kept of what they do.

Still, it seems logical to me that having the Mac in a public part of the house and supervising their usage is most likely to be the best quality solution. It'll take effort, though, it's not set and forget - but the set and forget options don't seem to be of particularly high quality.

The 'best' solution also depends upon how old the kids are, I suppose: the approach that's most suitable for five year olds probably is not the same as the way you'd tackle this for 16 year olds. Oops, gave away my secret - I'm Captain Obvious!

If anyone has better suggestions, or experience using software controls, I'd also be really interested in hearing about it. It's an interesting topic, as it's all about the balance of trust with protection with exposure with effort with... Hey, sounds like parenting! :)

Cods
2nd February 2009, 09:56 AM
ffs just let them look at porn.

If they were 15 timmy, perhaps... but I'd prefer to delay* having to explain a few things to a five year old! :eek:

Cheers.

[*note: 'delay', not 'avoid']

geektechnu
2nd February 2009, 10:16 AM
Another idea when first introducing kids to the internet is only introduce them to specific sites.
Using Fluid (http://fluidapp.com/) or Mozilla Prism (https://wiki.mozilla.org/Prism) you can create site specific browsers.

Fluid's whitelist feature can be used to lock it into a specific site.

For example, you could place an icon that directly opens "http://www.abc.net.au/children/" and always stays within the site.

little_yoharn
2nd February 2009, 10:38 AM
Wow, heaps to think about. I think I will be moving the mac into a better position than the office to keep an eye on them to start with. I will read up on a few of the links you guys have placed on replys. and see whats out there.
Thanks to all
Ly

TheWatchman
2nd February 2009, 11:05 AM
Yeah, put it in the same room as the TV or something like that, so you can sit there watching the TV but they will also know that they are being watched and can't look at things like...porn.

stevejay
2nd February 2009, 11:38 AM
Hello all,
After years of dial up I now have ADSL at home. Which leads me to a problem with the kids, they never went on line because it was so slow, now is a different story. I would like to keep it safe for them to search the net but are un sure if I need a program or if I can do the safety set up on the mac. running 10.3 on a power mac.

Frankly "nannies" don't work. It comes down to the simple fact that the nets are not a toy, nor are they a baby-sitter, just like with TV, books, music, it's up to you as a parent to supervise your kids. If they're young kids (under 12) you really should only allow them to use the net when you're in the room, or even better, sitting with them and the best way to lock them out when you're not in the room by setting up multiple user accounts on your 'puter, so that they can only get on the net when you log them on. (Mac OS has great built-in parental controls)

Age 12 and above they can have more freedom, but with rules and values according to your household rules and values, and discuss this with them in an inclusive way (don't lay down the law) and back up any access that's deliberate and inappropriate with lock outs of a day or say, other than for homework.

There's no easy or automated way to be a parent and the problem with automatic filtering is that it can block access to useful homework sites because of a smattering of "unsafe" content. If you supervise your children's use, and involve them in discussion of your safe surfing policy at home, they'll grow up to be sensible surfers and won't need filtering.

My credentials? 3 daughters currently 13, 16 and 18 who were brought up this way in the late 90s and early "noughties".

lenman74
2nd February 2009, 11:57 AM
Just be aware that changing your DNS can result in the loss of unmetered content allowance from your ISP (e.g iiNet's free iTunes downloads).

WHAT THE!!!!

Will openDNS do this. I think I have those setting activested. I better go home and check otherwise I will be way over this month.

tcn33
2nd February 2009, 12:45 PM
Freezone content could also become metered if you alter the DNS settings for your computer. We recommend using the automatic settings assigned by our servers so this doesn't happen.

Cods
2nd February 2009, 05:44 PM
There's no easy or automated way to be a parent and the problem with automatic filtering is that it can block access to useful homework sites because of a smattering of "unsafe" content. If you supervise your children's use, and involve them in discussion of your safe surfing policy at home, they'll grow up to be sensible surfers and won't need filtering.

My credentials? 3 daughters currently 13, 16 and 18 who were brought up this way in the late 90s and early "noughties".

Thanks - that sounds like solid advice!