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OneShow
12th January 2009, 09:45 AM
Does anyone know a good site to get some Australian iPhone stats like usage, web presence etc?

We would love to develop an App for one of our clients and want to be able to shock-and-awe them with some numbers :)

I know Apple is pretty secretive about sales so my Google searches have come up with zero.

motef
12th January 2009, 06:59 PM
Does anyone know a good site to get some Australian iPhone stats like usage, web presence etc?

We would love to develop an App for one of our clients and want to be able to shock-and-awe them with some numbers :)

I know Apple is pretty secretive about sales so my Google searches have come up with zero.

Just remember which US Administration introduced the term "shock and awe"

And we all know how that turned out! :)

Shock and awe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_and_awe)

mab
12th January 2009, 07:37 PM
Just remember which US Administration introduced the term "shock and awe"

And we all know how that turned out! :)

Shock and awe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_and_awe)

Humm. 1996, that would be the Clinton Administration.

matthew858
12th January 2009, 07:39 PM
The iPhone web browser has 50% of the mobile Internet browser market.

The iPhone holds the record for the most popular smartphone in 2007 (according to Guiness World Records 2009 sitting next to me).

The iPhone sold more handsets than RIM did last quarter.

motef
13th January 2009, 06:32 AM
Buildup

Before the 2003 invasion of Iraq, officials in the United States armed forces described their plan as employing shock and awe.[10]

[edit] Conflicting pre-war assessments

Prior to its implementation, there was dissent within the Bush Administration as to whether the Shock and Awe plan would work. According to a CBS News report, "One senior official called it a bunch of bull, but confirmed it is the concept on which the war plan is based." CBS Correspondent David Martin noted that during Operation Anaconda in Afghanistan in the prior year, the U.S. forces were "badly surprised by the willingness of al Qaeda to fight to the death. If the Iraqis fight, the U.S. would have to throw in reinforcements and win the old fashioned way by crushing the republican guards, and that would mean more casualties on both sides." [11]