PDA

View Full Version : Why should I Jailbreak/Unlock my Iphone?



MasterJaxx
4th January 2009, 03:57 PM
Ive seen alot of people talk about jailbreaking and unlocking their Iphones. But what exactly does that do?

I have an Iphone 3G. What benefit would i get from unlocking or jailbreaking it?

matthew858
4th January 2009, 03:59 PM
Unlocking means to use your iPhone with any carrier in the world.
Jailbreaking means to install software Apple doesn't want you to install. You also have greater flexibility over customisation of the iPhone.

Both can now be done on an iPhone 3G.

wmyeoh
4th January 2009, 05:30 PM
Search is a great function.

http://forums.mactalk.com.au/54/59938-jailbreak-similar-unlocking-iphone.html

http://forums.mactalk.com.au/56/57966-jailbreak-what-apps-would-make-worthwhile.html

http://forums.mactalk.com.au/47/64465-oh-boy-oh-boy-jailbreaking-me.html

krolly
4th January 2009, 05:48 PM
Ive seen alot of people talk about jailbreaking and unlocking their Iphones. But what exactly does that do?

I have an Iphone 3G. What benefit would i get from unlocking or jailbreaking it?

If you are happy with the contract you have there is no need to unlock your iPhone. It's really for people who want to change carriers.

matthew858
4th January 2009, 06:02 PM
If you are happy with the contract you have there is no need to unlock your iPhone. It's really for people who want to change carriers.

To get away from the awful coverage of Optus and the awful pricing of Telstra...

TheKeddi
4th January 2009, 06:15 PM
I did mine last night, I like the themes and things.

laughingbird
4th January 2009, 07:51 PM
Ive seen alot of people talk about jailbreaking and unlocking their Iphones. But what exactly does that do?
I have an Iphone 3G. What benefit would i get from unlocking or jailbreaking it?

As has been said, unlocking allows you to use any SIM card. Even if you are happy with your present carrier, that could be useful if travelling overseas. Instead of being stuck with overseas roaming rates, you can pick up a local pre-paid SIM and pop it in. If your phone was still locked, it wouldn't work.

Jailbreaking, as said, allows you to install non-Apple approved software. Three examples of the potential value of that from my own phone at present (there were others in the past such as when the Apple software didnt have Australian number formats right, and we were able to fix it ourselves on jailbroken phones).

1. I use a non-approved SMS app called BiteSMS (http://www.bitesms.com/).It has some things I don't like (a bit slow and no live numbers) but it adds a character counter, the ability to forward messages, and the ability to send through either your carrier or the Bite SMS internet service. I find the first two of those really valuable. I presume Apple don't give us a character counter because their preferred carriers don't want them to.

2. I have a non-approved app called iPhone Modem (http://www.iphonemodem.com/) that allows me to tether my laptop to my phone when I'm away from WiFi access and thus get internet access on my laptop using the 3G or GPRS data access of my phone. In the last week, working from the family beach house, that's been fantastic. Apple don't allow it because it wouldn't work for AT&T in the USA who give unlimited data on the iPhone.

3. I use a non-approved flashlight app. This is not as big a deal as the previous two, but it is better than any of the approved ones. The reason is that Apple don't allow apps to mess with the screen brightness, so the official flashlight apps are limited to the set screen brightness. The non-approved one gives a huge boost to the screen brightness and makes it a genuinely useful flashlight. You wouldn't want to use it for long, because it would drain the battery, but it's great when you need it.

Lots of people also like the customised appearance options available for jailbroken phones. That's no big deal to me, but the three above genuinely add to the functionality of the phone. There are lots of others available too, but those are the ones I use,and they make jailbreaking worth it for me.

voiletmay
6th January 2009, 07:11 AM
Thanks mentioning BiteSMS. I think this is just what I need. I hate the sms function on the iphone, it does not fulfill my smsing needs at all. I still have to carry around my old phone, so I can sms properly. Not quite sure bitesms does quite yet either, but I did see their homepage and they have a forum where you can request new features - so that is brilliant.

Shame I have to jailbreak it to be able to use bitesms. Not really viable on my iphone, as my iphone has issues with all the USB ports on my PC and I cannot do a firmware update without killing the iphone (ipod touch is the same). My husband needs to do the firmware updates on his PC. So there is no way I would risk jailbreaking it and having it even more unstable because of my USB port problem.

Sigh.. I wish apple would update their stupid SMS app, it's the worst thing about the iphone.

wmyeoh
6th January 2009, 08:41 AM
I haven't used BiteSMS, but I am using MySMS, which has a demo version with full functionality, except you get the occassional nag screen and 30 sec timeout. I would highly recommend this product. It has landscape SMS, forwarding (to SMS, email or notes), character count, password protection, ability to insert a contact, template, note or current location and encrypted SMS.

It cost 7 bucks for the full version, which I was more than happy to pay given how good this app really is.

voiletmay
6th January 2009, 09:34 AM
Thanks wmyeoh, My SMS seems like just what I need. Shame that you need to have a jailbroken iphone to use it. I'd happily pay for it, if I didn't have this dreadful firmware/usb port problem.

wmyeoh
6th January 2009, 09:56 AM
voiletmay, you can theoretically jailbreak and update your firmware on any PC or Mac that has iTunes - it doesn't need to be your home or work computer that you would otherwise use to sync with. This means you could pop around to any friend's place and "borrow" their computer for a couple of hours!

drewbles
6th January 2009, 10:15 AM
If you are happy with the contract you have there is no need to unlock your iPhone. It's really for people who want to change carriers.

Bzzzt. Try again. Jailbreaking simply unlocks your phone for applications, it is *not* a carrier unlock.

A Beta unlock has been provided by the iPhone Dev Team however. I have not tried it, as all carriers in Australia *will* unlock your phone on request, be it with or without a fee (Fee for Telstra, Fee for Voda, Fee for Optus pre-paid but no fee if on contract).

Jailbreaking gives you freedom to install what *you* want, not what Apple want you to have. There's no reason not to jailbreak really, unless you're happy with how things are right now with stuff from the App Store.

mitty
6th January 2009, 10:21 AM
The three main reasons I jailbreak are:

a) custom SMS, calendar alert and alarm tones... a feature sorely missing from the iphone
b) carrier logo (pure eye candy and no functional purpose, but looks cool)
c) SBsettings, allows easy wifi on and off, even when inside Safari/Mail/whatever.

I do have a few other minor things installed as well, like five icon dock and statusnotifier (status icons in the toolbar), but the first three are the main reasons I jailbreak. All those features would be dead simple to include in the official OS but for Some reason Apple thinks it's six crappy SMS tones are all we want to hear.

I haven't installed winterboard as it made my phone crash constantly. Though again this is a feature that could be easily added by Apple and there'd be a whole theming/modding community spring up, they could even have them on itunes. Maybe one day.

wmyeoh
6th January 2009, 03:54 PM
On top of what mitty has said:

1) Agree that sbsettings is an absolute life-saver. Turning on/off the phone, wifi and 3G is such a headache otherwise.
2) Categories - allows you to group your apps into folders - another essential. I previously had about 7 screens of apps, and it was a nightmare trying to find anything. I now have 3.
3) Cycorder - why apple does not allow us to record video out of the box is beyond me. Cycorder fixes this oversight.
4) MxTube - allows you to download YouTube clips to your internal storage - would be especially useful for iPod Touch users.

microportal
9th January 2009, 12:06 AM
i just got an iphone and i am very confused with the consequences of jail breaking, is it an irreversible process that can brick the iphone or can you always restore the itunes to factory settings even after jailbreaking? Also will this void the warrenty? Is jailbreaking detectable?

chrism238
9th January 2009, 12:52 AM
It's completely undetectable.I'm not wishing to alarm newcomers, but I wonder on what basis many people make the above claim? Agreed, a casual look at a restored iPhone appears to show no signs of previous jailbreaking. But there are many files created and required for jailbreaking - now, after 18 months of jailbreaking why, how, are so many people confident that Apple doesn't check for, and record, at least one of these files?

I'm not trying to be alarmist, but unsubstantiated statements involving "completely" bother me.

mallo
9th January 2009, 06:57 AM
To make note of my experience in the apple store,

I had my iPhones home button playing up, so I went into chadstone and saw a 'genius' who swapped it for a new / refurb, in theprocess of swapping it he asked if I mindedif he ran some diagnostics test on it, I said no andhe proceeded connect it to a MacBook and run some sort of tool (I didn't pay close attention), I wonder if this is the sort of process where they could tell that if they cared?

My iPhone had been jailbroken a couple times, but the guy said nothing...

Just a thought...

Narooma
9th January 2009, 08:56 AM
I've read repeatedly on other forums that Apple do have diagnostic software that enables them to know if a iPod or iPhone has ever been jailbroken regardless of the owner restoring it.

drewbles
9th January 2009, 09:03 AM
I've read repeatedly on other forums that Apple do have diagnostic software that enables them to know if a iPod or iPhone has ever been jailbroken regardless of the owner restoring it.

I fail to see how they can detect it from a software point of view.

Jailbreaking = hacking the installed software on your phone.

Restore = restores that software to factory shipped install.

It would be like re-installing OS X onto your laptop from scratch and taking it back for repairs. How would the service centre know you may have had say pirated software on your computer before you "restored your macbook to factory install"?

I'd like to be proven otherwise, but I'm 99% sure it's just an urban legend.

chrism238
9th January 2009, 12:21 PM
I fail to see how they can detect it from a software point of view.
Jailbreaking = hacking the installed software on your phone.
Restore = restores that software to factory shipped install.I think you're not taking a technical enough view of the process.
Does the iPhone wipe itself and then pull and unpack a restoring, or new, ipsw image from a Mac, or does the Mac detect and connect to the iPhone, have an opportunity to first examine the iPhone's existing file-system, and then push an ipsw image, and possibly more, back to the iPhone?
Both are technically feasible, and reasonable approaches.