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mitty
31st December 2008, 10:44 AM
On Monday I had one of my regular "cable rationalisations". In my home I currently have:

White Macbook
Two iphones (one each for me and partner)
Vista HTPC Monster (two terabytes of inbuilt storage)
Partners crappy little Dell for general web surfage.

the HTPC is plugged into a 32" LCD which we use to watch TV/Videos/Everything, and also a Panasonic Surround Sound Stereo system.

For networking needs, I have a Billion Modem which is running in bridged mode, and a Netgear VOIP Wireless G Router I got from mynetfone.

Up til now the HTPC was plugged via Ethernet into the Router, but the Router and Modem were in a bit of a mess and we had cables and crap running all over the place.

So what we did was to move the modem and router into a cupboard above the fridge. It's now all completely hidden from view. We bought a USB Netgear G card for the HTPC, which works just fine. I disconnected every single thing, removed every single cable and then put it all back together and was left with heaps of spares and yet everything still seems to work fine :) It's funny how you plug things in and then forget why you did!

We did consider moving up to Wireless N and replacing the modem but I think we'll wait a while. I dearly want Apple to come out with a Time Capsule that has a built in Modem and VOIP but I doubt if that's likely.

I can still plug in Ethernet if I need to but all in all the new completely wireless setup works wonders and the house is much tidier as a result!

And it was also much cheaper than getting a guy in to run ethernet points around the place (something I'd still like to do but will wait until we get a full on electrician in to redo our lighting which also is on the to-do list).

wellsy89
31st December 2008, 10:56 AM
My setup at home is completely wireless except for the D-link router and the Airport extreme base station. What i have:

iPhone
Apple TV
iMac 20"
Powerbook
iMac 24"
Macbook pro
D-link router
Airport extreme base station

As you would imagine the D-link router connects to the Airport extreme base station and all the other connect to it.
Fairly simple but it works great. :)

adamd
31st December 2008, 11:09 AM
Good work :thumbup:

My house is almost completely wireless.
I'm thinking of buying a new wireless router/modem combo. This one we have now is so sloww... :(

We currently have 3 Vi$ta laptops connecting wirelessly, 1 MacBook (wifi), 1 desktop XP (ethernet) (it's right next to the router and you get that little bit of a faster speed) 1 iMac G3, connected via Ethernet (or by ethernet to AirPort Express), an iPhone and an iPod touch and of course the AirPort Express.

:)

spilla
31st December 2008, 11:10 AM
My network is all wired 100mbit ethernet where possible. The only things that use the wireless are my iPhone and my iBook. :)

Wireless is too slow and unreliable for my needs.

Piratbyran
31st December 2008, 11:35 AM
The majority of my house it laid out with gigabit ethernet (switch in the cupboard with the solar inverter) and firewire for one or two slower macs. The wifi is really only for my MacBook and iPhone when they are around the house.

The build of my house doesn't really allow for the use of wifi that much, think of 30cm + thick rammed earth walls, for some reason the signal is blocked somewhat, not sure why though :p

grfxninja
31st December 2008, 11:43 AM
The majority of my house it laid out with gigabit ethernet (switch in the cupboardPretty much the same exact setup I have. I still have the Airport Extreme for my MBP and AppleTV (because I haven't bothered putting in an extra Ethernet point in the lounge room yet - my xbox is using the only available point - but it still runs flawlessly) but everything else uses gigabit ethernet because I find wireless a bit slow for some things sometimes, and the wireless doesn't reach to my office at the end of the backyard :)


think of 30cm + thick rammed earth wall

:eek:

mitty
31st December 2008, 12:02 PM
My network is all wired 100mbit ethernet where possible. The only things that use the wireless are my iPhone and my iBook. :)

Wireless is too slow and unreliable for my needs.

Yeah, I know what you mean by that. For file sharing between my HTPC "server" type box to the laptops is a tad slow when it's all wireless, but I figure for small files and can stand it, and for big files I'll just transfer things using a USB stick. Of course if I upgrade to N I would hope that it'll be almost bearable regardless.

decryption
31st December 2008, 12:21 PM
This is probably a good thread to ask for tips on wiring up my house.
I want to bring in an electrician to install some CAT6 in the walls. My setup is thus:

STUDY
iMac
MacBook Pro
Wintendo
Ethernet Laser Printer
Spare port for random computers that find their way into my study
Another iMac for EyeTV recording/bit-torrenting/random use Mac

LIVING ROOM
Beyonwiz (probably will be replaced with an AppleTV soon)
Xbox 360
Future upgrades: AirPort Express, PS3

BACK ROOM/JUNK ROOM
File server
Firewall/router
AirPort Express


Should there be a socket in the wall for each device, with all the cables running to a central switch in a cupboard, OR, should I just have one socket in the study and living room, that run to the back room (so the back room has 2x RJ-45 sockets on the wall)?

Geoff3DMN
31st December 2008, 12:23 PM
A mix of wired and wireless here.

My iMac (which doubles as the print server) and my Quad core windows gaming box (which doubles as file server) both sit at the one desk. The Netgear router sits next to the phone point. Cat5E cables running at 100Mbit run to those 2 machines.

The other 5 computers in the house are all laptops and are (as is to be expected) carried around and run via wireless. The iPhone, the Xbox 360 and the Wii run via wireless as well.

There is no question that wired works faster and more reliably but it rather limits the portability of a laptop :)

W2ttsy
31st December 2008, 12:25 PM
i have full wifi at my place with a speedstream modem wired to the wireless router being the only cable connection.

have a linksys wireless router and an airport express that provide the services. 2 macbooks, iphone and g5 tower.

W2ttsy

marc
31st December 2008, 12:29 PM
Wired:
Modem
AirPort Extreme
Printer

Wireless:
Mac Mini (TV recording etc)
2x iPhones
PowerBook
MacBook Pro
Mac Pro

Given the choice, I'd have some things via ethernet, but I'd be neat about it.

Rogerthatv2
31st December 2008, 12:50 PM
At my place we have the following

Wired - Office Only
iMac
Lexmark Laser printer (also set up for wireless printing via AEBS)
Modem & Airport Extreme Base Station

Wireless (loungeroom and main bedroom, about 20m in front of house)
Apple TV
Nintendo Wii
Macbook
iPhone
Foxtel IQ2 (loungeroom to bedroom only)

Very happy with how the AEBS works for all of our wireless gear in the front of the house, have had no drop outs whatsoever and speed is brillant for watching streaming movies from the iMac or trailers via Apple TV. Also playing Nintendo Wifi games in great as well, no speed issues.

Have noticed the wireless panasonic phones suffer a bit but, very hard to hear sometimes and lots of noise on the line. iPhone wireless also interferes at times with the Foxtel iQ2 signal from the Lounge room to the bedroom, solve this by turning off the iPhone Wifi.

mitty
31st December 2008, 12:58 PM
Decryption,

For someone like you I would recommend a cupboard somewhere that you can put a big Router/switch in (probably 16 port would be nice by the sounds of things!) and then have sockets available where necessary. Even a patch panel of some sort would be good so you can then chop and change between phones and ethernet. The alternative is to have one socket in each room and a local switch in each room, though that might get expensive. Also if you want gigabit it's going to bump up the price as well! no idea how much it would all cost... but if you are getting a guy in to do it it'd be better to get it all done at once if possible. Also you could store servers etc away from prying eyes but still be able to access them via RDP or VNC.

In my place I've got multiple handy little hidey holes where I could put modems and routers. My phone sockets is sort on the wall on one side of the pantry, so it was a simply job to tap into the back of that and run a cable to the cupboard above the fridge.

marc
31st December 2008, 01:02 PM
mitty: Sounds like a good idea. One day soon I'll nerd up and do it too.

mitty
31st December 2008, 01:13 PM
mitty: Sounds like a good idea. One day soon I'll nerd up and do it too.

LOL. To get ours setup took bloody ages... and involved the dragging of cables through narrow cracks with stretched out coat hangers, and even at one point I used my video camera to look up into the hidden niche above our pantry to see exactly where the cable was going! Also had to use a circular hole saw to make a hole big enough for powercables to go through as well, but now that's all there regardless of what future equipement we get, as long as it's wireless, we're set.

PS how do you nerd up... put on a pocket protector and a propeller hat? :D

decryption
31st December 2008, 01:21 PM
Decryption,

For someone like you I would recommend a cupboard somewhere that you can put a big Router/switch in (probably 16 port would be nice by the sounds of things!) and then have sockets available where necessary. Even a patch panel of some sort would be good so you can then chop and change between phones and ethernet. The alternative is to have one socket in each room and a local switch in each room, though that might get expensive. Also if you want gigabit it's going to bump up the price as well! no idea how much it would all cost... but if you are getting a guy in to do it it'd be better to get it all done at once if possible. Also you could store servers etc away from prying eyes but still be able to access them via RDP or VNC.

In my place I've got multiple handy little hidey holes where I could put modems and routers. My phone sockets is sort on the wall on one side of the pantry, so it was a simply job to tap into the back of that and run a cable to the cupboard above the fridge.

So you think it'd be better to have say a 6x RJ-45 panel in the study, 4x RJ-45 panel in the living room and 4x RJ-45 panel in the back room - which all lead back to a patch panel in a cupboard?

shortlex
31st December 2008, 01:24 PM
I got an amateur set up.

iMac
Macbook Pro
Acer Laptop
Acer Desktop

all connected to a Telstra home gateway Modem/WirelessRouter.

tcn33
31st December 2008, 01:30 PM
So you think it'd be better to have say a 6x RJ-45 panel in the study, 4x RJ-45 panel in the living room and 4x RJ-45 panel in the back room - which all lead back to a patch panel in a cupboard?

I'm also watching this thread as I'm looking to have my new house wired during construction, and this is the setup I was thinking of.

At the moment we have two Macs wired in the office, and the Airport Express, Wii, AppleTV and iPhones running wirelessly, with a Linksys router receiving wirelessly in client mode for the PS3. It'd just be nice to cut down on the number of wireless devices to minimise interference I guess.

dotnet
31st December 2008, 01:44 PM
We've got all stationary boxes (MP, Mini, Linux servers, firewall, PS3, Topfield) wired up at either 100 or 1000Mbps, and all mobile stuff (MBP, MB, iPhones, Airport Express) on either the .11g or the .11n wireless network. The Airport Extreme and Time Capsule are both wired and wireless, of course ;)


So you think it'd be better to have say a 6x RJ-45 panel in the study, 4x RJ-45 panel in the living room and 4x RJ-45 panel in the back room - which all lead back to a patch panel in a cupboard?

For my needs I'd probably skip the patch panel, it wouldn't be cost effective. I'd put plugs on the cable ends and plug them straight into the switches.

Cheers
Steffen.

mitty
31st December 2008, 01:45 PM
So you think it'd be better to have say a 6x RJ-45 panel in the study, 4x RJ-45 panel in the living room and 4x RJ-45 panel in the back room - which all lead back to a patch panel in a cupboard?

Well that sounds like the ideal solution. If money was no object I would have multiple lan points in obvious places like where TV/entertainment centres go, studies, desks etc, and another lan point on every powerpoint in the house (well, not all of them!).

If I were you I'd have modem and router in one cupboard with all the lan points. Are you using VOIP? You might be able to have that in there as well.

As for TCN33, you are in the best position, go nuts with wiring because a new house under construction means it's going to cost you next to nothing because they're already putting in everything else!

arkenstone
31st December 2008, 01:50 PM
Should there be a socket in the wall for each device, with all the cables running to a central switch in a cupboard, OR, should I just have one socket in the study and living room, that run to the back room (so the back room has 2x RJ-45 sockets on the wall)?

I'd go a central distribution cabinet somewhere with some patch panels and a 24 port switch and then at least two outlets in every room. I've got tones of spare patch panels if you need.

That way you can always control what goes to what room and you can on-the-fly designate cable runs as data/voice/video and so on. This is how I did my parents place before I moved out. 2x cat5e runs to every room (I still don't think there's much of an argument for cat6) then in the comms cabinet you determine if both runs are data, or voice, or voip, or whatever.

Running four lengths of cable is fuck all more expensive than running one length of cable - cable is bloody cheap, it's the labour and the drilling of the holes and the climbing in the roof and the terminating that'll cost you.

Walk into your local Middy's and buy 300 metres for $100 before you call the sparky in.

recd
31st December 2008, 01:53 PM
Until I added an iPhone to the mix, I had an all wireless N setup of:
MacPro
Apple TV
windows bitsa box
Time capsule
With the iphone an a PS3 added I needed to change to an b/g/n network, which was to slow for time machine.
Now have wired
Mac Pro
Apple TV
iPhone
PS3
With cat 6 to the Time capsule and
iPhone
widows bitsa wireless.
I live in an older house on piers so just drilled some holes in the floors to run the cables!

tcn33
31st December 2008, 02:39 PM
As for TCN33, you are in the best position, go nuts with wiring because a new house under construction means it's going to cost you next to nothing because they're already putting in everything else!

Yep, that's the idea :) So you think just outlets where needed, all leading to a 16-port central switch in a cupboard is the way to go?

decryption
31st December 2008, 03:01 PM
I'd go a central distribution cabinet somewhere with some patch panels and a 24 port switch and then at least two outlets in every room. I've got tones of spare patch panels if you need.

That way you can always control what goes to what room and you can on-the-fly designate cable runs as data/voice/video and so on. This is how I did my parents place before I moved out. 2x cat5e runs to every room (I still don't think there's much of an argument for cat6) then in the comms cabinet you determine if both runs are data, or voice, or voip, or whatever.

Running four lengths of cable is fuck all more expensive than running one length of cable - cable is bloody cheap, it's the labour and the drilling of the holes and the climbing in the roof and the terminating that'll cost you.

Walk into your local Middy's and buy 300 metres for $100 before you call the sparky in.

If I have 2x RJ-45 in each room, I'll still need to have a 5-port switch in each room to handle the multiple devices. Am I right?

I'm thinking of just keeping it simple and having 1x RJ-45 in the living room, 1x RJ-45 in the study which both run to the back room where there will be 2x RJ-45, that plug into a switch in there. I already have 2x gigabit switches, just need one more and I'm set.

Here's a shitty diagram:

http://heyinternet.com/imgdump/skitched-20081231-160815.jpg

Dog Knight
31st December 2008, 03:11 PM
Some kind of modem/router supplied by internode.
Open 812L voip adapter attached.
Netgear WNR2000 Wireless N router also attached (setup as a switch).

Power Mac G4 attached to netgear.
Custom PC attached to internode router.
Custom PC attached to TV via wireless N USB adapter.
Nintendo Wii wirelessly attached to network.

Thats it for now, will be adding more soon.

Tragedies
31st December 2008, 03:34 PM
I've got a basic setup.

My Mac in my room and my sister's Macbook going wireless (connected to the Airport Extreme across the house).
Parent's computer connected via Ethernet (due to their computer being right near the modem and Airport).
Xbox 360 connected via a 20 meter Ethernet cable running through the wall (already had a hole in the wall and office so I just put the Ethernet cable through there. Kind of wish Microsoft made the 360 have wireless like the damn Wii).

mitty
31st December 2008, 04:25 PM
Yep, that's the idea :) So you think just outlets where needed, all leading to a 16-port central switch in a cupboard is the way to go?

Yep, leaves you the most flexibility. The most important thing is the cabling, you can worry about routers/switches/patch panels/whatever at a later date.

EdgeOfQuarrel
31st December 2008, 04:26 PM
hell yeah i'm wireless 100% !

virgin preshafted USB modem

mobile phone

GIT 'ER DOOOOONE!

Shaun R
31st December 2008, 05:11 PM
My setup:

Netspace 1550 / 16 Bundled $40
Linksys WAG200G (all in one ADSL, 4-port Ethernet, 802.11g)
with
- iMac 20" 2.4GHz C2D 4GB 320GB Aluminium August 2007
- DIY PeeCee 3GHz Pentium 4 1GB 180GB December 2005
- HP Laptop 2GHz AMD (Pentium 4 equiv) 1GB 100GB Mid-07
- iPod Touch 8GB 1st Gen 2.2
all connected wirelessly
plus
- Apple AirPort Express (802.11g) as my WiFi Print Server, connected via Ethernet to the Linksys, also acts as my AirTunes provider.

I received the AirPort as a gift, dunno why, but I do use it, even if it's not to it's full capabilities!

:)

Shaun

iMic
31st December 2008, 05:53 PM
I've set up a completely wireless configuration in this house. The main wireless access point is mounted directly in the centre of the house (so roughly around the kitchen area) with the three systems all around it. Internet is fed in via that access point to a wireless transmission tower (since we don't have any ADSL or cable services in this area), the hardware itself is mounted on the outside roof.

Extra devices such as media centres, iPhones and so on jump directly onto that AP.

Occasionally I have a secondary 802.11g point set up for heavy operations or instances where we need connectivity but a lower security level (such as the Nintendo DS my other siblings have, only connects to WEP networks, not WPA).

We used to have a wired system running throughout the house to a patch panel and cable modem setup, but it proved too difficult to implement for the needs and I chose to retire it when I moved premises.

There's a certain joy about being a network administrator full time, you can come home and set up an equally complex network in your own home. :D

purana
31st December 2008, 06:00 PM
I'm also watching this thread as I'm looking to have my new house wired during construction, and this is the setup I was thinking of.

At the moment we have two Macs wired in the office, and the Airport Express, Wii, AppleTV and iPhones running wirelessly, with a Linksys router receiving wirelessly in client mode for the PS3. It'd just be nice to cut down on the number of wireless devices to minimise interference I guess.

Best time to do it. I ran all my cat5e cables during construction. We also ran 300 metres of speaker cables for the home theater, dining room and entertainment area outside. So the amp can drive the speakers in those other locations from the theater room.

A mate also ran all our alarm cables at the same time on the same weekend. 34+ cable runs just for the alarm panel itself. I have pictures, will post tomorrow if I don't have time now. It looked like a bird nest.

I had hoped to run cat5e to understairs area, but it wasn't practical, so they terminate in my office and run to various rooms.

http://img520.imageshack.us/img520/2388/img3576zu9.jpg

Alarm panel cables.

http://img520.imageshack.us/img520/7684/img0071ve8.jpg

CAT5e leads from various rooms terminating in the home office. One of the CAT5e leads runs unfiltered phone service from central filter splitter.

EDIT: And we do not purely use Wireless ONLY. Leverage everything off the ethernet backbone. We run a 802.11n network, and an 802.11g (which is extended downstairs via an airport express g unit plugged into the ethernet backbone in theater room, so I don't have to use wireless bandwidth to extend it).

NeoRicen
31st December 2008, 06:08 PM
My modem is wired to my Airport Extreme, but that's it. The Xbox 360 used to be wired until the router was moved, so now it's just not connected to the internet until I can get a wireless adapter.

Brains
31st December 2008, 06:19 PM
Like my old house, my new abode is almost totally devoid of wireless -- seven computers on both storeys hooked to a small switch using a mix of cat5e and some HomePlugs. We do have a Netgear wireless router, but the wifi is only enabled when my sound-engineer housemate needs to test the remote audio controller hardware his work sells.

bakeraus
31st December 2008, 06:25 PM
Wired

- Modem
- Xbox 360

Wireless

- iMac 24"
- MBP 17"
- MBP 15"
- iPhone

Not all mine but used to have blue cable running around every where in the house looked like we were pirating software.

Al Aero
31st December 2008, 06:36 PM
Wireless:

Iphone
Macbook Pro
PS3
Wii
Printer
Airport Express
Airport Extreme

Wired
Modem
EXT Drives

a.

semaja2
31st December 2008, 07:01 PM
If you have the money i would suggest getting 2 cat6 cables installed to every main room, and 1 cat6 cable to the minor rooms (food storage/laundry)

The 2nd cat6 cable in the major rooms would be for telephones

All data points lead to a patch panel somewhere :)

Now that is a setup :) with that you have perfect speed and easability and future expansion :)

pcutrona
31st December 2008, 07:23 PM
Wired

- Router
- Airport Extreme

Wireless

- iMac 17"
- MBP 15"
- MB 13"
- Wii
- Nokia N95
-Airport Express-as a repeater station to extend network.
-Powerbook G4 15" 1.67
-MediaGate( just purchased it and absolutely fantastic for watching all those avi's upscaled to 1920x1080 via HDMI)
-Epson 7300CXi

iCameron
31st December 2008, 08:13 PM
My network is split into 3 segments.

Upstairs

1 Cable Modem, 1 Gigabit Wireless Router

1 Wired Server
1 Wired NAS drive
2 Wireless/Wired Laptop's

Downstairs

1 Gigabit Wireless Router

1 Wired/Wireless PS3
1 Wired PC
1 Wired/Wireless Laptop

My Room

1 Gigabit Router

3 Wired PC's
1 Wired/Wireless MBP
+ Whatever usually is there, router has 5 ports.

I wouldn't dare use anything but a gigbit networking. I also turn off all my wireless at night, and try to use it as little as possible. As it's just wayy to slow

All networking gear is Belkin (Lifetime warranty!)

W2ttsy
31st December 2008, 09:39 PM
I'm also watching this thread as I'm looking to have my new house wired during construction, and this is the setup I was thinking of.

At the moment we have two Macs wired in the office, and the Airport Express, Wii, AppleTV and iPhones running wirelessly, with a Linksys router receiving wirelessly in client mode for the PS3. It'd just be nice to cut down on the number of wireless devices to minimise interference I guess.

i wrote about this on another forum ages ago, cant find it, but heres my insight:

since you have free run of the wall cavities, stick as much as you can in now. it'll cost a 10th of what a post build install would. Also, get the electricians to drill extra drop holes in the noggins for future use. they can mark them in the ceilings with fish tape if you ask nice enough.

power:

run at least 1 independent circuit per room for special devices, AV systems, computers, etc. This should be a single circuit breaker on the main board and be marked with a red or blue circle on the powerpoint. Each powerpoint on this circuit should be surge protected.
Also have regular powerpoints on the main circuit to compensate for regular devices like heaters, fans, random plug in stuff. Don't plug your auxiliaries into the special powerpoints. If the main circuit blows, this may just protect your expensive stuff.

AV system:

plan your living room out for things like TV, audio, HTCP and the like. work out your powerpoint requirements to reduce powerboards and remember that some devices have thick power adapters.

Even if you dont have a serious audio system, plan for it. Wire in banana plugs for left and right speaker cable and consider having an audio guy come in and plan your speaker locations. if youre going to drop serious coin on AV gear, youll want it to be set up right afterall.

network:

stick in a wall panel next to your powerpoint that has at least 2 rj45 sockets. you should add a patch panel to the end so that you can designate voice/data to each point. Just hang a router off the wall if you need extra ports in that part of the room.

wiring closet:

terminate the network in a room or area that will be out of the way of household traffic. it doesnt need to be a wiring closet, but the upside of that is there is room for servers, NAS or something else that has heat/noise considerations. this area should have its own circuit, some sort of cooling system and racks/shelves for mounting gear. You will also want to stick in a patch panel, have it be your inlet for phone and even stick your circuit breakers in there. chuck a lock on the door for extra security.

this is my plan for when i get a shot at building my house. although i plan to get things like home control and fancy electro transparent glass too :D

W2ttsy

muddie@mac.com
1st January 2009, 12:19 AM
I bought $50 worth of Cat5e cable on eBay and wired my house myself. A point in every room. All 3 of my kids have Macs and I run a server and another mac in the office and a PS3 in the Theatre room and an AppleTV in my bedroom. But then we also have a wireless network for the Wii and the MacBook and my iPod Touch. The wired network is great we can all be watching a different movie off the server on all computers and the AppleTV at the same time and it runs perfectly. Try doing that on a wireless network!

matt231
1st January 2009, 02:45 PM
Mine is a combination of Wireless N and gigabit ethernet.

I use gigabit wherever possible though.

mattydee
1st January 2009, 04:25 PM
i wrote about this on another forum ages ago, cant find it, but heres my insight:

since you have free run of the wall cavities, stick as much as you can in now. it'll cost a 10th of what a post build install would. Also, get the electricians to drill extra drop holes in the noggins for future use. they can mark them in the ceilings with fish tape if you ask nice enough.

power:

run at least 1 independent circuit per room for special devices, AV systems, computers, etc. This should be a single circuit breaker on the main board and be marked with a red or blue circle on the powerpoint. Each powerpoint on this circuit should be surge protected.
Also have regular powerpoints on the main circuit to compensate for regular devices like heaters, fans, random plug in stuff. Don't plug your auxiliaries into the special powerpoints. If the main circuit blows, this may just protect your expensive stuff.

AV system:

plan your living room out for things like TV, audio, HTCP and the like. work out your powerpoint requirements to reduce powerboards and remember that some devices have thick power adapters.

Even if you dont have a serious audio system, plan for it. Wire in banana plugs for left and right speaker cable and consider having an audio guy come in and plan your speaker locations. if youre going to drop serious coin on AV gear, youll want it to be set up right afterall.

network:

stick in a wall panel next to your powerpoint that has at least 2 rj45 sockets. you should add a patch panel to the end so that you can designate voice/data to each point. Just hang a router off the wall if you need extra ports in that part of the room.

wiring closet:

terminate the network in a room or area that will be out of the way of household traffic. it doesnt need to be a wiring closet, but the upside of that is there is room for servers, NAS or something else that has heat/noise considerations. this area should have its own circuit, some sort of cooling system and racks/shelves for mounting gear. You will also want to stick in a patch panel, have it be your inlet for phone and even stick your circuit breakers in there. chuck a lock on the door for extra security.

this is my plan for when i get a shot at building my house. although i plan to get things like home control and fancy electro transparent glass too :D

W2ttsy

all very good, if you want to go all out you could ensure that the "server" room was on the same wall as you intend to put your tv and feed all tv cables to that room through the wall(possibly using wall plates) and have all set top boxes and consoles hidden in the room. you would need to employ a IR remote relay system though(the console's controllers would work through the wall). this would allow the LCD/Plasma to be wall mounted very cleanly

W2ttsy
1st January 2009, 04:44 PM
all very good, if you want to go all out you could ensure that the "server" room was on the same wall as you intend to put your tv and feed all tv cables to that room through the wall(possibly using wall plates) and have all set top boxes and consoles hidden in the room. you would need to employ a IR remote relay system though(the console's controllers would work through the wall). this would allow the LCD/Plasma to be wall mounted very cleanly

you dont need to have an IR receiver. you can get some pretty extensive wireless and wired remotes that will do home automation. High class hotels often have this sort of setup.

my plan is to have a designated room for cinema where there is a screen at the front, and then the receivers, players and content are in an annex or room behind the seating, much like a real cinema. Apart from signal degradation over distance, you could house all your boxes and just push the signals along cables to wall plates.

W2ttsy