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internet
13th May 2005, 03:32 PM
All.. bit of an interesting question. I've moved into a new house, and next door, there is a small home/office deal where the user has an open wireless network, with DHCP..
It gives me direct outbound access to the Internet over what appears to be 1500kb ADSL..

Now, this is interesting. If he had WEP, and I had sat there collecting packets and I cracked them to get the key and i joined the network and stole his bandwidth, it would obviously be illegal.. However, the fact that they have no method of access control makes me wonder.. would it actually be illegal. There is nothing to tell me this person is not running an open wireless connection free for anyone to join.. a "hotspot" if you will.

If i joined his open network and ran a buffer overflow exploit to his lotus notes 6.5 server over the http port to gain "administrator" access to the config page then that would also be illegal, but frankly i'd be doing is connecting and browsing a few light webpages out bound.

Illegal, or not?

ps; being a network security engineer by trade, i'm going to go over there and introduce my self and offer to secure the wireless connection, and recommend they put a password on the AP's config page, and an Administrator password on the lotus notes server, and an Administrator password on the windows file server :S

iSlayer
13th May 2005, 03:35 PM
Illegal

Disko
13th May 2005, 03:37 PM
I'm going to go with "yes - it is illegal."

Just like if you open a door and walk into someone's house it can be considered as 'breaking and entering' if the door was already open it can be called 'trespassing'. I'm sure that somewhere in 'ye oldé book of lawz, there is a line which outlaws it.

mvjs
13th May 2005, 03:38 PM
Think about it this way, your stealing his internet, without him knowing. i.e. stealing

Its illegal

napes
13th May 2005, 03:41 PM
Ask him if he minds? ;)

adamjc
13th May 2005, 03:50 PM
Stealing!!!

I had my wireless internet without a WEP key on it and found someone leeching off my connection. Still dont know who it was but would have had to have been someone living next door or behind our house.

Have had no problems since generating a KEY.

Adam.

applenewbie
13th May 2005, 03:53 PM
what the...?

is it just me or did most of this post make no sense whatsoever?
all I know is if i lived next door to a broadband connection with speeds like that, Id be downloading like a madman

only kidding

you are a gentleman for offering your services to them (for free?)

markh
13th May 2005, 03:55 PM
We've had this discussion before, and I take the other view. Being, that since there is no security or passwords on it, its a free-for-all. Just has if it was public wifi hotspot.. ie: Its your own stupid fault if you leave a wifi connection unsecured and you dont unwanted users.

iSlayer
13th May 2005, 03:59 PM
hey mark if you left your car unlocked would you be annoyed if someone drove off in it ?

Jimbo
13th May 2005, 04:03 PM
just because i leave my car unlocked doesn't mean that
its a free-for-all and anyone can come along and take it for a drive. Yes it is a security issue, but i'd still be able to file a stolen car report with the polizi, and if they caught the perpetrator, he'd be prosecuted.

just because you can, doesn't mean you should.
"so in closing... It's the constitution, its mabo, its the vibe, no its just the vibe..."

markh
13th May 2005, 04:04 PM
Originally posted by islayer@May 13 2005, 04:59 PM
hey mark if you left your car unlocked would you be annoyed if someone drove off in it ?
It would be my own stupid fault ;-) But that is a digression..... A friend of mine who is a lawyer, had this dicussion lasttime we had this subject came. It would come down to the fact (and there is no law on wireless use), by having an "Open wireless connection" you are ineffect inviting people to use your service for free.

iSlayer
13th May 2005, 04:07 PM
Originally posted by Jimbo@May 13 2005, 05:03 PM
but i'd still be able to file a stolen car report with the polizi, and if they caught the perpetrator, he'd be prosecuted.

you can do the same thing here.
technically it would be classed as hacking

markh
13th May 2005, 04:08 PM
Originally posted by islayer@May 13 2005, 05:07 PM
you can do the same thing here.
technically it would be classed as hacking
No it wouldnt, beause you have not done anything illegal. You have not "hacked" any secruity at all. Its an open book so to speak

adamjc
13th May 2005, 04:08 PM
I still think that with all good and bad things in life you have to refer back to this one quote:

"Dont do onto others that you dont wish done onto yourself."

Adam.

marc
13th May 2005, 04:17 PM
Originally posted by internet@May 13 2005, 03:32 PM
1500kb ADSL
TPG... :love:

Definitely illegal.

Rayd
13th May 2005, 04:18 PM
Originally posted by markh@May 13 2005, 05:08 PM
No it wouldnt, beause you have not done anything illegal. You have not "hacked" any secruity at all. Its an open book so to speak
mate, you asked for advice on this, and for opinions, and you are getting replies... why are you arguing to people that are just replying to your own topic?

if you know the answer than why did you start the thread ?

EDIT: sorry mate, your right hehe i should have looked at the thread more carefully :P

TorranceTM
13th May 2005, 04:21 PM
Illegal - No
Morale - No

iSlayer
13th May 2005, 04:22 PM
he didnt start it ipod_man

marc
13th May 2005, 04:22 PM
Originally posted by ipod_man@May 13 2005, 04:18 PM
if you know the answer than why did you start the thread ?
Because he wants someone else to back up his actions so he doesn't feel guilty.

Illegal, no doubt at all.

markh
13th May 2005, 04:23 PM
Originally posted by ipod_man@May 13 2005, 05:18 PM
mate, you asked for advice on this, and for opinions, and you are getting replies... why are you arguing to people that are just replying to your own topic?

if you know the answer than why did you start the thread ?
I NEVER STARTED THE THREAD!. LOOK BEFORE YOU REPLY NEXT TIME.

adamjc
13th May 2005, 04:23 PM
Originally posted by TorranceTM@May 13 2005, 04:21 PM
Illegal - No
Morale - No
Agreed on Moral Issue.
But how can you claim it isnt illegal?
Your stealing bandwidth from someone that may just not be computer savvy enough to setup a WEP KEY.



Adam.


EDIT: EXPANDED ON MY POST.

marc
13th May 2005, 04:23 PM
Originally posted by TorranceTM@May 13 2005, 04:21 PM
Illegal - No
Morale - No
Please give reasons for you answer.

scruffie
13th May 2005, 04:24 PM
I'm with markh here, i dont think its illegal to connect to an unsecured wifi.

I think its illegal to connect a network that is
a) secured - implies that there is consent required; or
B) unsecured but clear that the network shouldn't be connected to (i dunno, maybe a sign or something).

But with this one, we only know that it's unsecured. There's no signs or letters or phone calls saying 'my unsecured network is mine, and you cannot use it unless i give my permission'. It could very well be that the guy just left his wifi unsecured because he wanted to share, and provide a wonderful public good :)

iSlayer
13th May 2005, 04:25 PM
ITS ILLEGAL
how can you claim its not.
you are using something you didnt pay for and you know its not yours.

marc
13th May 2005, 04:28 PM
Originally posted by scruffie@May 13 2005, 04:24 PM
implies that there is consent required
So if you walk into someone's house when the door is open (or just unlocked) you feel like you don't require consent? Not at all. Searching for the network, then clicking "connect" is the same act.

TorranceTM
13th May 2005, 04:29 PM
Originally posted by marc@May 13 2005, 04:23 PM
Please give reasons for you answer.
Talk to a lawyer if you want to know all the ins and outs, it is a very interesting hot area at the moment.

markh
13th May 2005, 04:32 PM
Originally posted by islayer@May 13 2005, 05:25 PM
ITS ILLEGAL
how can you claim its not.
you are using something you didnt pay for and you know its not yours.
Under that then you'd be saying that using an open wifi connection in a public place, ie cafe strip, is illegal then?

1) Didnt pay to use the wifi
2) Its not mine.. maybe some cafe owners?

As TorranceTM posted, if you want to know more, speak to a lawyer.. Its not illegal at present.

marc
13th May 2005, 04:33 PM
My sister is a lawyer, I have dinner with layers every monday night, I studied some music law and IP law, and I've also negotiated quite a few contracts. I do have some background and I cannot see how this could be anything but illegal.

The most important thing to consider is that the user connecting to the unprotected network knows it's not a publicly offered service. I'm sure the person renting the ADSL line could try and recover some of the money if they caught someone leeching their net connection.

iSlayer
13th May 2005, 04:34 PM
Originally posted by markh@May 13 2005, 05:32 PM
Under that then you'd be saying that using an open wifi connection in a public place, ie cafe strip, is illegal then?
.
Well considering the fact that the reason that they would have the network is so you can use it for free.......

They are letting you use it.
in "Internet's" case the user has not allowed him to use it therfore its illegal

marc
13th May 2005, 04:35 PM
But if you'd all like, I can make a phone call to confirm.

Squozen
13th May 2005, 04:35 PM
It's no less illegal than tapping into your neighbour's phoneline or electricity. Just because somebody is ignorant about security does not give you the right to steal from them. That's the sort of mentality I'd expect from a 15-year-old warez junkie.

marc
13th May 2005, 04:40 PM
Btw, I'd love to know what wireless hardware/software comes with all the security turned off. I can't imagine anyone doing it on purpose... unless it was a trap. It'd be fairly easy to packet sniff and steal some details etc.

markh
13th May 2005, 04:42 PM
Originally posted by islayer@May 13 2005, 05:30 PM
for everyone who said its not illegal you better have a firewall running since i could browse and use your personal files and it would be perfectly legal according to you
browsing personal files, would be illegal.. We are talking here about using the "datalink" of an open wireless connection. Accessing files, would the be hacking.

macmate
13th May 2005, 04:48 PM
Originally posted by adamjc@May 13 2005, 04:23 PM
Agreed on Moral Issue.
But how can you claim it isnt illegal?
Your stealing bandwidth from someone that may just not be computer savvy enough to setup a WEP KEY.



Adam.


EDIT: EXPANDED ON MY POST.
i disagree......

as it stands i don't think its illegal because the wireless connection is being 'broadcast' and not password protected. I think they should make a law making that illegal but as it sits at the moment i don't think it is. if of course the it was a closed network (not publicly broadcast) but still with no password then i think it you then become illegal as you had to snif to find it.

but of course it is still immoral and therefore should be illegal.

Oh, also, its different to the phone taping someone suggested it was like. that would involve hacking of some sort. this involves sitting down and have your computer auto connect to an open network and you browsing. how is one to know if they didn't mean for it to be an open network?

obviously the only way to know is by knocking on the door and asking if you can use their connection for a bit since their network is open, and if they say no then you don't. this is why there needs to make a law, because as it stands we all agree it might not be moral but it might not be actually illegal.

Ric

Jimbo
13th May 2005, 04:49 PM
you also gotta look higher in the chain, most isp's don't mind at all you 'sharing' your net connection between your own private residencies, but i know that mine at least, tell you not to offer it to anyone outside your private property, for cost OR free

Quamen
13th May 2005, 04:49 PM
Originally posted by islayer@May 13 2005, 04:30 PM
for everyone who said its not illegal you better have a firewall running since i could browse and use your personal files and it would be perfectly legal according to you
Hardware firewall....check
software filewalls.....check
WEP encryption....check
MAC address filterng....check

I reckon it'd be illegal to mess with my computers.

This other guy with his open wireless network on the other hand.....definately not illegal to have a look around. Would be a bit different if you started taking files and causing general havock on his machine though.

Using the internet connection though I am a bit undecided on...one side of me thinks it's kind of like a public park without a fence, or a property without the border clearly marked....you have to expect someone to go for a walk in it evetually....The other side of me says it's taking something that isn't yours without prior consent.

Then of course there's the other side of me that thinks if the person is stupid enough to leave it unprotected then that's their own damn fault. I'd be inclined to sign up and start pasting text files onto this guys desktop with titles like "read me to find out why you should do something about your wireless network" and a few instrictions inside it. Maybe a phone number to ring if they want some help. hehe.

scruffie
13th May 2005, 04:50 PM
Originally posted by islayer@May 13 2005, 04:34 PM

in "Internet's" case the user has not allowed him to use it therfore its illegal
I dont think we know that yet do we? afaik he just left the network unsecured...

marc, so how does it work? what are the requirements for it to make it legal or illegal?
is it the onus upon the person who connects to the network to seek permission first?

okay what about this scenario...

i go to a cafe. its a wireless internet cafe.
i open up my ibook and just connect to one of the wireless networks.
it turns out that the internet cafe's network was down that afternoon and i was connecting to a neighbours unsecured network.
assuming that is illegal to connect to an unsecured network, would it my belief that i was connecting to a publically offered service mean it would be okay or be considered to be a mitigating circumstance?

kudos for interesting topic :)

geektechnu
13th May 2005, 05:08 PM
They pay for a service.
If they choose to extend this service to you (free or not), then great.
If there is no agreement in place - don't do it.

At a public hotspot there is usually some agreement in place that says that access is open to the public - the owener is aware that it is open. Otherwise you are just exploiting someone's ignorance..

I'd compare to going into your neighbour's house uninvited to store stuff in the excess space of their fridge, or watch cable TV.

...or sleep in one of their beds during the day because it just happens to be empty at the time. :ph34r:

internet
13th May 2005, 05:10 PM
Originally posted by scruffie@May 13 2005, 04:50 PM
I dont think we know that yet do we? afaik he just left the network unsecured...

marc, so how does it work? what are the requirements for it to make it legal or illegal?
is it the onus upon the person who connects to the network to seek permission first?

okay what about this scenario...

i go to a cafe. its a wireless internet cafe.
i open up my ibook and just connect to one of the wireless networks.
it turns out that the internet cafe's network was down that afternoon and i was connecting to a neighbours unsecured network.
assuming that is illegal to connect to an unsecured network, would it my belief that i was connecting to a publically offered service mean it would be okay or be considered to be a mitigating circumstance?

kudos for interesting topic :)
yessssssssss that's more what i'm talkin' about..

i think it'd be pretty hard to charge me with anything

"shit sorry your honour i thought it was my wireless network, is someone going to pay my bus fare home now?"

darknight84
13th May 2005, 05:14 PM
Yeah its illegal but if they are stupid enough to not put any security then they deserve it

Snowy28
13th May 2005, 05:29 PM
Hmm ... interesting that the term broadcasting is used.

A radio broadcast is free ... what if somebody is using an iTrip and I pick up their frequency, am I stealing their music?

TorranceTM
13th May 2005, 05:47 PM
Let me clarify:

I am only referring to the use of the wireless network and the Internet connection.

The Police would NOT come knocking on your door if he complained to them, it would be deemed a civil not criminal matter.
The only avenue he would have is to sue you for lost earnings by you using his connection and any extra related costs with the connection itself, the court would then have to determine if you may have made that connection to his network by mistake thinking it was your own.

kristen86
21st March 2008, 02:23 PM
Immoral yes, but illegal no. There is no legislation that I am aware of which makes such a thing criminal. Just because it seems like it should be illegal does not make it so :P

Section 408E does make computer hacking a crime, but this involves access to a restricted computer where some actual damage has been caused.

Under the Criminal Code 1899 (QLD) (which is fairly similar ot other states), it is unlikely that this would come under the definition of stealing, in which the thing has to be capable of being stolen which is - Anything that is the property of any person is capable of being stolen if it is—
(a) moveable; or
(b) capable of being made moveable, even if it is made moveable in order to steal it.

The legislators simply would not have envisioned this when they wrote the act in 1899! I'm sure there are similar provisions in other states.

Although interestingly enough, they are proposing a bill in Maryland in the US which will make such a thing illegal, with a $1000 fine and up to 3 years jail!

The Herald-Mail (http://www.herald-mail.com/?cmd=displaystory&story_id=188912&format=html)

They may have civil action to recover for any damages, but honestly what damages would they incur? Slower internet connection :P

Sorry to come in as a newbie, just that I was doing some research for my blog and came across this thread! If you want to have a look, it is here (http://maclawstudent.blogspot.com/): The Mac and the Law Student (http://maclawstudent.blogspot.com/)

[MREVO8]
21st March 2008, 02:46 PM
It's kind of a grey area. I'd say it's immoral, but probably not illegal (not sure if a law exists for this).

The unprotected signal is being broadcast on to your property... you don't have to "hack" any security, and you aren't trespassing on their property to gain access. So, you aren't "breaking and entering" as some other people have analogised.

If you don't want your neighbours looking in the bedroom window... close the curtains.

benixau
21st March 2008, 02:56 PM
I think we need to split this up:

Using his wireless network - legal
Using his internet connection - illegal

In other words - if all you're doing is connecting your computers together for some personal file-sharing etc and it doesn't impair his ability to use it then it's most probably legal.

BUT - when you use his internet connection then you are taking his property (the connection and data allowance he paid for) without compensating him.

Beau
21st March 2008, 03:27 PM
Gotta love Wikipedia

Advocates compare the practice to:

Sitting behind another passenger on a train, and reading their newspaper over their shoulder.[2]
Enjoying the music a neighbor is playing in their backyard.
Using a drinking fountain.
Sitting in a chair put in a public place.
Reading from the light of a porch light or streetlamp.
Eating another's leftovers abandoned at a restaurant.

Opponents to piggybacking compare the practice to:

Entering a home just because the door is unlocked
Hanging on the outside of a bus to obtain a free ride.
Connecting one's own wire to a neighbor's house to obtain free cable TV service when the neighbor is a subscriber.

And here's the law in Australia

Under Australian Law, "unauthorised access, modification or impairment" of data held in a computer system is a federal offence under the Cybercrime Act 2001. The act refers specifically to data as opposed to network resources (connection).
In the state of Western Australia it could be construed as "Unlawful operation of a computer system". The use of bandwidth or other resources could also be construed as theft if it involves deception then fraud.

Legality of piggybacking - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_Piggybacking)

Brains
21st March 2008, 03:28 PM
It is not a grey area at all -- unauthorised access to a communications network is illegal under Australian Federal Law, as per the Telecommunications Act 1989 (http://legislation.gov.au/ComLaw/Legislation/Act1.nsf/bodylodgmentattachments/A27D557965281488CA256F7200172C2F?OpenDocument#SECT 143) Sections 114 and 143.

If you connect to your neighbour's open wifi network without his express permission, you are committing a felony.

oddturtle
21st March 2008, 03:44 PM
Sorry to come in as a newbie, just that I was doing some research for my blog and came across this thread! If you want to have a look, it is here (http://maclawstudent.blogspot.com/): The Mac and the Law Student (http://maclawstudent.blogspot.com/)

I use macs, and I am studying law too. But I wouldn't have ever thought to put those two together in a blog. :) Interesting angle.

thorevenge
21st March 2008, 03:47 PM
I believe in the UK they recently set a precedent in court that it is illegal. Whilst this is yet to be ratified in Parliament, I think it is a step towards agreeing its illegal from a judicial PoV.

mab
21st March 2008, 04:36 PM
It should not be illegal for the simple reason that there is no way to tell if if the network has been left open for public use, which is the case a lot of the time in the US, and here in Darwin (mesh network) If you do not want people to connect to your network, that you are broadcasting though my lounge room, lock it down.

Phase
21st March 2008, 05:00 PM
the network has been left open for public use, which is the case a lot of the time in the US,

I would love to see this attitude adopted here in Australia. If everyone shared their internet access (in the city's) with everyone else, it would make PDAs, iPhones, Laptops and so on a lot more desirable as a means of communication.

Of course it rely's on 'all in or none in' but think of the potential if every Aussie CBD has hundreds of hotspots.

(obviously, you'd need to lock-down popular p2p ports on the modems. But there's huge potential here).

tanguero
21st March 2008, 05:06 PM
I just found this thread.

When I first set up a wireless network at home I had no idea what I was doing.
So when my neighbours used my connection I didn't even know.
Sadly I became aware of the situation when my Tel$tra bill for a $30 plan cost me $340 for the first month.

So now my network is locked and re-named "steal from someone else you thieving bastards"

Oh yes, and I have changed to TPG.

The bottom line is that laws maintain the status quo not justice and it is up to us to take responsibility for what is right and what is wrong.

TheWatchman
21st March 2008, 05:30 PM
way to bring up an almost 3 year old thread

Brains
21st March 2008, 05:43 PM
It should not be illegal for the simple reason that there is no way to tell if if the network has been left open for public use, which is the case a lot of the time in the US, ...

It is up to the provider. And simply by plugging in a wireless access point to our broadband infrastructure, according to the Telecommunications Act, you become a provider.

Whether the owner of the WAP realises what they are doing or not, they are both obligated and protected by the law in this regard. Sadly, most people are totally ignorant of this, nor the associated security ramifications when their Hardly Normal or Apple reseller convinces them to buy a router with wifi in it; the industry (which includes Apple) is at fault for pandering to ease-of-use by shipping units in an unsecured state -- what should happen is that the WAP be shipped locked, with step-by-step setup instructions which require the entering of a wifi security key (or the deactivation if wifi security) as part of the set-up procedure, and the router cannot access the internet until setup is completed.

In the United States, it is now a federal felony to "allow public access to lewd, obscene, suggestive or offensive material", with minimum fines of US$10,000 per offence (US SAFE Act of 2007, passed into law 9th Dec) (http://thomas.loc.gov/home/gpoxmlc110/h3791_eh.xml). This means anyone wishing to provide an open WAP (such as a coffee-lounge, library or airport 'free' wifi pont) must, by law impose filtering or blocking techniques to prevent open access to sites containing 'inappropriate' material. If you happen to find some ignorant schmoe's open home wifi network in downtown Duluth and access 4chan, you and he have broken the law. More than 400 people, businesses and organisations have been prosecuted under this law already since it was passed last December.

It is no secret that the Rudd Government is seeking to have a similar amendment added to our Telecommunications Act, one of the few communications initiatives carrying over from the Liberal Government's internet protection schemes.

Katey
21st March 2008, 06:04 PM
well its 2008 now unlike the start if this thread. If your still running a open wifi unintentionally you have no excuse to complain about people connecting to it. Pay the poor kid in the local store to come set it up if you don't have any clue about networking. I live on a farm and I use WEP although it's impossible for anyone to get in range of it (but surprise surprise you wont find broadband here). My brother lives out of town also and he runs open wifi. I offered to make it secure but he said anyone who wants to sit out there with the cows and use his adsl then thats fine by him.

If im in town waiting in the car for some reason and theres open wifi for my ipod I connect and surf some pages, ones called "Free Public Wifi" others are called stuff like "Belkin" "Connect to this"

Maybe I need to put an ad in the paper offering to secure wifi's for 50$ each, since theres 10 to 20 open wifi's in every street I could make my millions.

feeze
21st March 2008, 06:48 PM
It should not be illegal for the simple reason that there is no way to tell if if the network has been left open for public use, which is the case a lot of the time in the US, and here in Darwin (mesh network) If you do not want people to connect to your network, that you are broadcasting though my lounge room, lock it down.

Last time I checked, ignorance is not a legal defence.

richbowen
21st March 2008, 06:49 PM
Maybe I need to put an ad in the paper offering to secure wifi's for 50$ each, since theres 10 to 20 open wifi's in every street I could make my millions.

I reckon the availability of open wifi everywhere is a furphy. Especially in the CBD.

I regularly find myself and my MB in cafes - on the occasions when I try to find an open wifi connection I reckon I succeed less than 10% of the time. There's always the Telstra "open" network that you can only use if you pay$ or are an existing Telstra subscriber of some sort. But apart from that it's very hit and miss. Even from the websites that list free hotspots - out of date, or free while you eat/drink etc in the establishment (which I think is quite reasonable) but I certainly think most CBD/business wifi is well and truly secured (as it should be).

Steiny
21st March 2008, 06:53 PM
Here's an interesting article from earlier this year encouraging leaving wireless networks unsecured:

Steal This Wi-Fi (http://www.wired.com/politics/security/commentary/securitymatters/2008/01/securitymatters_0110)

One of the key points made is that the openness of the network is a defence against someone else doing dodgy things via it - as opposed to proving it wasn't you if you had all these blocks in place.

The biggest difference I can see is all the usage caps we have down here, and the potential for leechers to use up one's precious gigabytes and the subsequent throttling.

silverdreamer
21st March 2008, 07:31 PM
It's illegal, end of story, but, how would you get caught?

Here where I am at the moment, I can access 4 other wireless signals from my apartment, that are not protected. If I walk down the street and pick a spot anywhere along the esplanade or Surfers Boulevard, the same. The overseas travellers and students use them all the time. There's an office down the street that has an unsecured network, and there is always someone sitting on the footpath outside of a night happily surfing away.

Katey
21st March 2008, 07:54 PM
I reckon the availability of open wifi everywhere is a furphy. Especially in the CBD.

I regularly find myself and my MB in cafes - on the occasions when I try to find an open wifi connection I reckon I succeed less than 10% of the time. There's always the Telstra "open" network that you can only use if you pay$ or are an existing Telstra subscriber of some sort. But apart from that it's very hit and miss. Even from the websites that list free hotspots - out of date, or free while you eat/drink etc in the establishment (which I think is quite reasonable) but I certainly think most CBD/business wifi is well and truly secured (as it should be).

I live out in the country, nearest town has 1 set of traffic lights, I would say 50% of the wifi in the main area of town is 'open' but often there too weak to connect or they may have mac address filtering etc. Also an ipod is far from a white van with giant booster on the roof. The local highschool seems to have very fast broadband on open wifi. I'm going to to get some fish from a suburban area right now, so i'll take the ipod and see if theres hot spots out there.

choy
21st March 2008, 08:03 PM
illegal and you're lucky you're not in singapore:

Singapore judge sentences teen for Wi-Fi hack - vnunet.com (http://www.vnunet.com/vnunet/news/2172846/teen-gets-months-wi-hijack)

Katey
21st March 2008, 09:04 PM
Only found one in the main street open at 8pm, which I have no doubt belongs to as buisness, all the houses out to the fish shop were locked. Seems most the open ones I know are buisnesses or schools.


Besides Singapore having it's own set of rules he only got 80 hours community work, considering he was probably using that connection to pirate movies he did pretty well.

kim jong il
21st March 2008, 09:36 PM
... Sorry to come in as a newbie, just that I was doing some research for my blog and came across this thread! If you want to have a look, it is here (http://maclawstudent.blogspot.com/): The Mac and the Law Student (http://maclawstudent.blogspot.com/)
Don't apologise. Welcome to MacTalk. :)

krafty
21st March 2008, 09:44 PM
iphones are made for free wireless, great to look for new emails anyway.

mab
25th March 2008, 05:06 AM
Sanity (http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080323-bill-criminalizing-wifi-leeching-shot-down-and-rightly-so.html) appears to reign in Maryland.

iSilver
25th March 2008, 11:02 AM
ethically, you'd probably be doing the wrong thing ... legally, probably not, until it was tested in court.

I had someone attached to my router the other day, turns out i forgot to turn the access control list on

jubilantjeremy
25th March 2008, 11:03 AM
I'm on one now! (Macbook)

shihyuan
25th March 2008, 11:48 AM
I would say it's illegal too.

Also I wouldnt be a happy man if someone ever steals my wifi connection.