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View Full Version : Seeking Owners of New Unibody Macbook Pros for Feedback



djiashi
20th November 2008, 03:06 AM
Im seeking for those with the current new unibody MBPs to kindly give me some feedback regarding the performance of their notebooks as currently thinking of changing from my primary computer iMac 2.8GHz 2GB Ram to one of the new mbp.

I have around 30-40 gigs of photos (not much compare to some i reckon) and with my iMac, I can scroll down and up freely with very very limited jerkiness while browsing my entire photo library. Can the new MBP handle this with ease?

Reason Im asking is because I previously had the early 2008 MBP 2.4GHz 2GB ram 5400rpm hdd and it jerks whenever browsing my entire library. And it gets slightly laggy when opening heaps of applications. The iMac on the other hand is perfect in terms of performance handling for my kind of usage. So just wanna see if the new MBPs are as good.

So just wanna get some feedback from everyone especially those with 2.53 or 2.8Ghz and 512mb video card.

Would the increase video card make a significant difference as well?

Thanks in advance!:)

scritch
20th November 2008, 06:40 AM
The main thing that I believe will make a difference for you is a 7200rpm HDD.

Personally I have no issues scrolling through my iPhoto (and now Aperture) library in the way you describe.

I have the 2.4GHz Dual Core MBP (Unibody) with 4Gb RAM and a 500Gb 5400rpm HDD.

Regards,
Shane.

MissionMan
20th November 2008, 07:07 AM
I have a similar size library (maybe larger). I have no issues with jerkiness when scrolling down on my new macbook pro.

I suggest you also up the ram to 4GB, it may stop some of the lagginess with apps.

If you want to have a look at mine let me know, I see you are also in Melbourne. It may give you a good comparison.

Stevoid
20th November 2008, 08:19 AM
I've got a few hundred photos and mine hasn't skipped a beat. Though the upgrade to a 7200 RPM HDD will help alot with that, also the RAM upgrade isn't a bad idea :)

farscape
20th November 2008, 12:53 PM
I have just moved my 16gb of photo's from my old Hp laptop onto my new MBP 2.4gb and I'm getting a little bit of lag scrolling down the page when viewing the main library but other wise if I'm just viewing albums itís just as fast as my late 2007 imac 20í
maybe upgrading to a 7200 rpm hd and upgrading the ram from 2 to 4 gb ram may improve the performance but for me Iím happy as is

djiashi
20th November 2008, 01:07 PM
thanks guys. i was suspecting the old 5400rpm hdd and prob 3mb cache on my Penryn MBP would have caused it.

seriously thinking of the upgrade/downgrade from my imac 2.8ghz to a mbp 2.53 ghz which Im finding hard to decide.

ZacDavies
21st November 2008, 03:40 AM
The main thing that I believe will make a difference for you is a 7200rpm HDD.

x2

Balthazar
21st November 2008, 05:56 AM
OP: kinda off-topic but i have a macbook 2.2ghz 2gb ram etc... (late 2007) with a large RAW photo library (about 30GB and experienced the same using iPhoto to manage it, Splashed out on Lightroom 2.0 (http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshoplightroom/) finally and never looked back, the way it manages displaying photo's as previews rather than the actually file scaled works perfectly smooth.

I know it quite an expense but i would recommend it to anyone serious about photography

iCarllovesapple
21st November 2008, 09:29 PM
Well.. I have had toooo many problems with my Macbook Pro. I have had 2 in 3 weeks!
Don't buy it yet. It's a piece of crap... (From my experiences!!!)
Good Luck! ;):(

Galumay
21st November 2008, 09:36 PM
i just wish people would stop using the term 'unibody' for the 2nd generation MB/MBP's.

its a term that applies to the vehicle industry and Apples use of the term is pure spin.

Balthazar
21st November 2008, 10:27 PM
i just wish people would stop using the term 'unibody' for the 2nd generation MB/MBP's.

its a term that applies to the vehicle industry and Apples use of the term is pure spin.

Make me think of "Unitard" .... *shudder*

vecsty
21st November 2008, 11:38 PM
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ZacDavies
21st November 2008, 11:53 PM
i just wish people would stop using the term 'unibody' for the 2nd generation MB/MBP's.

its a term that applies to the vehicle industry and Apples use of the term is pure spin.

I think it's perfectly valid here.. but ah, what nickname would suggest for this recent generation?

shortlex
21st November 2008, 11:55 PM
i just wish people would stop using the term 'unibody' for the 2nd generation MB/MBP's.

its a term that applies to the vehicle industry and Apples use of the term is pure spin.

agreed, the term unibody is to describe the manufacturing process, ultimately, all three, the macbook, macbook pro and macbook air are all unibodies

spargo
21st November 2008, 11:58 PM
I think it's perfectly valid here.. but ah, what nickname would suggest for this recent generation?

MacBook Pro with the awful glossy screen? :p

yep, that'll do.

Galumay
22nd November 2008, 07:10 AM
sorry guys, the manufacturing term "unibody" in no way is relevant to the Apple laptops. as i said its purely spin by apple for marketing purposes.

unibody is a method of construction that does away with the need for a seperate structural frame and non-structural skin. considering the previous MB/MBP's, iB's, PB's etc were all constructed without structural frames its quite irrelevant.

the term which is an automotive term can be applied to lots of things where the construction method has done away with the need for chassis, frames, or other internal structural support such as boats, planes and houses - but it is incorrect to apply it to something like a laptop that never had a separate structural frame in the first place.

its as silly as saying a "unibody cup" or "unibody brick"

mind you i dont know why i am bothering let it upset me! marketing people have been misusing the english language since the first ad was invented.

Phase
22nd November 2008, 07:19 AM
sorry guys, the manufacturing term "unibody" in no way is relevant to the Apple laptops. as i said its purely spin by apple for marketing purposes.

unibody is a method of construction that does away with the need for a seperate structural frame and non-structural skin. considering the previous MB/MBP's, iB's, PB's etc were all constructed without structural frames its quite irrelevant.

the term which is an automotive term can be applied to lots of things where the construction method has done away with the need for chassis, frames, or other internal structural support such as boats, planes and houses - but it is incorrect to apply it to something like a laptop that never had a separate structural frame in the first place.

its as silly as saying a "unibody cup" or "unibody brick"

mind you i dont know why i am bothering let it upset me! marketing people have been misusing the english language since the first ad was invented.

So Unibody then.

Right.

Galumay
22nd November 2008, 07:51 AM
So Unibody then.

Right.

*sigh* yep, the spin doctors win again. :(

mind you i did hear them referred to as monoblock body, which is slightly more accurate. :D

vecsty
22nd November 2008, 09:33 AM
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Galumay
22nd November 2008, 10:28 AM
actually your post are all spin.

Doug Field and Jonathan Ive would be lambasted in the design and engineering community if your assumption were correct. But they are not.

To quote Jonathan Ive, Apple's Senior VP of Industrial Design "precision aluminium unibody enclosure"

please, if you want to argue the point do so, but dont resort to ad hominem attacks. attacking me instead of the argument doesnt help you present a convincing point of view.

your hyperthetical proposition that a couple of Apple employees using the term would be lambasted if the term was misused as i maintain is hardly a convincing argument either.

the logical extension is that anything that someone claims is true unless someone else challenges it.

i continue to believe that the misuse of the term 'unibody' is the mangled invention of the marketing spin doctors at Apple, as i said i should be used to marketers butchering the english language by now!

*takes a sip of coffee from his unibody mug"

basseyy
22nd November 2008, 10:45 AM
I've got the late 2008 MBP with 7200 HD, its great, and for the upgrade from 5400 to 7200 it cost me only $72, my old iMac was 5200, and the MBP is alot faster, programs seem to load up faster, editing, cropping is a breeze, I'm yet to try video editing, but I expect it to be as fast.. so I'd say 7200 is the way to go... hope this helps

-basseyy-

spuds_imac
22nd November 2008, 11:21 AM
I to have the 2.53GHz Dual Core MBP (Unibody) with 4Gb RAM and a 320Gb 7200rpm HDD. With a large RAW photo library and have no problems at all.:thumbup:

DaveOZ
22nd November 2008, 02:24 PM
Perhaps monocoque would be better?

mab
22nd November 2008, 02:44 PM
So Unibody then.

Right.

Maybe Monocoque (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monocoque)

Edit damn beaten to it :)

Xenex
22nd November 2008, 03:06 PM
unibody is a method of construction that does away with the need for a seperate structural frame and non-structural skin. considering the previous MB/MBP's, iB's, PB's etc were all constructed without structural frames its quite irrelevant.

Right here is where your argument falls apart - the old MacBook and MacBook Pro designs all had internal structural frames separate to the casing.

Galumay
22nd November 2008, 04:19 PM
Right here is where your argument falls apart - the old MacBook and MacBook Pro designs all had internal structural frames separate to the casing.

damn! and i thought i had quite a good argument going there. i assumed the internals were non structural mounting plates etc - certainly what it looked like inside my 17" MBP.

still if what you say is correct and they were structural frames and there are none in the new MB/MBP's then i am utterly incorrect in my criticism of the term 'unibody' and my accusations of spin doctoring by apple marketeers!

DaveOZ
22nd November 2008, 04:55 PM
Right here is where your argument falls apart - the old MacBook and MacBook Pro designs all had internal structural frames separate to the casing.

A bit like the new one then!! The chassis is one part but the body is made up of the chassis plus the lower covers that are screwed on and clipped on. So unichassis or monocoque :D

dawsman
22nd November 2008, 06:08 PM
Back onto the topic... I think the new GeForce 9600M GT nVidia cards also represent a big improvement over the previous MBP

Xenex
23rd November 2008, 06:57 PM
damn! and i thought i had quite a good argument going there. i assumed the internals were non structural mounting plates etc - certainly what it looked like inside my 17" MBP.

When your MacBook Pro was open, did you do anything besides replace the hard drive? I'm guessing not, else you'd have noticed this:
http://www.opinionstick.com/images/2008/20081123-MBPFrame.png
So yeah, that little guy is where the MacBook Pro gets its strength from. It's a piece of metal attached to the bottom case.

Jumping back a step:

unibody is a method of construction that does away with the need for a seperate structural frame and non-structural skin. considering the previous MB/MBP's, iB's, PB's etc were all constructed without structural frames its quite irrelevant.

The old MacBooks *did* have a structural frame with non-structural skin. I know it's 'marketing', but watch Jonathan Ive talk from about 12 minutes into the October 2008 Event video (http://www.apple.com/quicktime/qtv/specialevent1008/). He steps through a dissection of an old MacBook Pro's casing.

The new MacBook casings are just the metal, with components like the logic board attached directly. Having pulled apart both, there's a huge difference in strength between the traditional and unibody units.



A bit like the new one then!! The chassis is one part but the body is made up of the chassis plus the lower covers that are screwed on and clipped on. So unichassis or monocoque :D

Using that logic, no vehicles would be unibody either, because they add those pesky doors.

Galumay
23rd November 2008, 07:50 PM
The new MacBook casings are just the metal, with components like the logic board attached directly. Having pulled apart both, there's a huge difference in strength between the traditional and unibody units.
.

ok, ok, enough already! you have exposed me for the opinionated windbag that i am, can we leave it there please. :D