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sttevo
25th October 2008, 08:31 PM
Hey Dudes,

I am a switcher from Windows. Well, I've had a few Macs but been running Vista on Bootcamp for quite some time, but finally taking the plunge into Mac OS X full time. I like what I see so far and it's been a fun experience.

The question I have is what program would you recommend to run for a web developer? I'm starting to learn PHP and set up the Apache web server with PHP and MySQL etc, but haven't picked which application to run for actually writing/managing the code.

I've come from a Microsoft background and been using Visual Studio for many years, and never really looked sidways at Dreamweaver, and from what I read it's a bit of a dog on Mac? I know CS4 is out but Adobe haven't released a trial yet, and I don't really want to fork out all of that cash if it's no good either.

So can anyone recommend a good app for Mac OS X out there?

Thanks in advance, and looking forward to being more of a part of the Mac world :)

sttevo

Huy
25th October 2008, 08:33 PM
Adobe have released a trial.

According to this thread anyway:
http://forums.mactalk.com.au/21/60439-adobe-cs4-trial.html

You'll probably want something like Coda and TextMate:
Panic - Coda - One-Window Web Development for Mac OS X (http://www.panic.com/coda/)
TextMate ? The Missing Editor for Mac OS X (http://macromates.com/)

dotComrade
25th October 2008, 08:36 PM
I use Adobe CS3, I have found that it runs perfectly on my MBP. But I have to admit, most of the stuff I do is hand written. As such, I have spent a lot of time testing out a bunch of code editors on the Mac. My absolute favourite free editor at the moment is Smultron. TextWrangler is also a very popular free app.

EDIT: The paid apps are FAR superior to the free apps. If I wasn't such a poor student I would use Coda.

elnewb
25th October 2008, 09:04 PM
I prefer Coda and Textmate. If you are serious about web design and development then all you really need is a basic text editor.

Huy
25th October 2008, 09:08 PM
Old school.

vi

conufsed
25th October 2008, 09:15 PM
I do Rails dev for a living, and used to do PHP. All you need is a decent editor. TextMate is decent, so is vi. Emacs sucks :)

Dealing with Apache & PHP on OSX is much easier than on windows!

cmrn
25th October 2008, 09:18 PM
+1 for Coda & Textmate (+ Transmit for a dedicated FTP client)

Just be sure to purchase Transmit before you get Coda, as you get a discount when buying Coda that way, but they didn't let me have it the other way round :-(

anarchron
25th October 2008, 09:45 PM
Coda is awesome for webdev, especially if you don't do much server side scripting. It still gets the job done quite well, though only if your site is written PHP.

I personally use Coda for webstuff and Textmate for misc things like Ruby on Rails.

banjo
25th October 2008, 09:56 PM
Coda is great. If you buy Transmit for your FTP client you also get a discount on it. I find it is as easy to manage things as Dreamweaver is ... if you like to micromanage your code and assets and not let somebody else do it.

stewiesno1
25th October 2008, 09:59 PM
Tell us what Mac you have for a start, ram , OS etc.

Stewie

reemixx
25th October 2008, 10:03 PM
Dreamweaver has become bloated and frustrating, I reckon. I use Coda with XAMPP, works fine for me. Give it a go :) There's a lot of automation stuff in Coda though, some people like that, some don't. Most of it's customisable I think.

pengu
25th October 2008, 10:21 PM
personally i use Coda for development, MAMP Pro for my local dev environment (Apache/PHP/MySQL) and run Apache WebDAV+SVN on my other machine for my source code repository.

elnewb
25th October 2008, 10:32 PM
Looks like everyone agrees. Buy Transmit(The FTP client) and then Coda. You will need a decent FTP client if you are doing web work.

nard
25th October 2008, 10:39 PM
If you can wait around for a while then you might be interested in Espresso (http://macrabbit.com/espresso/) or perhaps you can request to become a beta tester.

harrisonx
25th October 2008, 10:51 PM
I'm a web designer and I do all my own front-end development work, as well as some PHP and MySQL back-end work on the odd occasion.

I used to use dreamweaver, which was great for managing the sites [automatically saving a local copy and then uploading to the server] but was otherwise WAY too clunky and bloated.

I switched to Coda earlier this year, and haven't looked back. It doesn't manage the sites as nicely as DW, but I've taken to working directly on the server [saving uploads directly to the server, but doesn't save a local copy] and then doing a local backup at the end of the session.

It's perfect for CSS and HTML work, and pretty darn excellent for the PHP side of things. As others have said, it's not great for FTP [though not bad once everything is up on the server and only a few things need to go up every now and again] so check out Transmit for a fully featured FTP. I'd also recommend checking out ForkLift, which was pretty ordinary the first few versions, but the recently released update is MUCH improved, with a much better interface.

I manage the MySQL schemas with Sequel Pro, which is an evolution of CocoaMySQL. The MySQL Administrator tools that you can download from the MySQL website are also pretty decent.

sttevo
25th October 2008, 10:52 PM
Wow thanks for the quick response guys.

Yeah I definitely want to hand code and if I were to use something like Dreamweaver it would never be in design mode. I'm more of a coder than designer, but some of these look pretty cool. I'll run a few and get a feel for which one I like the most.

@stewiesno1: I'd be running on my new MBP w/Leopard so hopefully none of the above should have any problems running on it!

marc
25th October 2008, 10:57 PM
The best tools for web dev (IMO):
Coda (http://www.panic.com/coda/)
CSSEdit (http://macrabbit.com/cssedit/)
Transmit (http://www.panic.com/transmit/)
... and OS X's Terminal (no, I don't use terminal in Coda!).

Also, Espresso (http://macrabbit.com/espresso/) looks like it'll be brilliant when released.

Dreamweaver is balls.


I'd be running on my new MBP w/Leopard so hopefully none of the above should have any problems running on it!
Coda, CSSEdit etc are all very, very lightweight, quick and good OS X citizens. They'd run well, even on a low spec machine. Don't let that fool you though, they have a long list of killer features.

pengu
26th October 2008, 01:15 AM
It doesn't manage the sites as nicely as DW, but I've taken to working directly on the server [saving uploads directly to the server, but doesn't save a local copy] and then doing a local backup at the end of the session.

im not sure what you mean by this. I use Coda all the time, and i've found it great for managing local/remote copies of files.

xfodder
26th October 2008, 03:15 AM
Textmate + CSSEdit ... i don't like Coda, doesn't agree with my workflow and i really really don't like how it manages CSS, im a tester for Espresso and can't wait for the first beta to land in my lap, the app looks/sounds perfect for me :D and the third party add-ons is a really good idea!

oh and thanks for that link to Sequel Pro, that app is great for managing MySQL db

avolve
26th October 2008, 05:24 AM
I have played with Coda a little, though still use SourceForge.net: Smultron (http://sourceforge.net/projects/smultron/) :



Smultron is a text editor written in Cocoa for Mac OS X Leopard 10.5 which is designed to be both easy to use and powerful.

[i have used it with 10.4.x]

I also use MAMP and CSSEdit (a great app)

GarageFriend
26th October 2008, 05:32 AM
I tried Coda once,

It's a very nice program to use. Can recommend. I am no web developer, but I tried my hand at it.

Gothikon
26th October 2008, 07:49 AM
Textmate + Photoshop

If you want something a bit less hardcore Coda is awesome.

If you're worried about messing up your built in Apache/PHP and MySQL try MAMP instead (standalone install of PHP/MySQL/Apache), even include phpmyadmin, yay!

banjo
26th October 2008, 11:42 AM
I manage the MySQL schemas with Sequel Pro, which is an evolution of CocoaMySQL. The MySQL Administrator tools that you can download from the MySQL website are also pretty decent.

I don't know how I managed to forget about CocoaMySQL ... love it! Will have to check out Sequel Pro though. If it's an improvement on already decent program I'll be very happy.

Angsty
26th October 2008, 11:53 AM
Well, I don't know if I am 'old school' or just 'out of date' but I use Cyberduck for my FTP client.

Have played with the Coda demo version, but I still seem to continue to revert to EditPlus (Win ony) for writing code.

Have signed up for Expresso beta tester, so will probably make the plunge and join the 21st century :)

Soliah
26th October 2008, 01:21 PM
@OP:

If you're coming from Visual Studio I assume you've been developing on the .NET platform? C# or VB? If that's the case you don't really have many options. I notice that the majority of people have recommended good text editors for HTML/CSS/JS/PHP IDEs. These are all good and well but if you're coming from .NET and plan on developing for that platform you won't have much choice but to install VMWare and code using VS08 (which is what I do). There is Mono (http://www.mono-project.com), though I haven't really looked into it. From what I've been told though, there are still issues with compatibility when using Mono.

If you're building any substantial web apps, you may want to look into the J2EE platform. Lot's of tools and multi-platform development make it quite good. That combined with a good data persistence layer (Hibernate (http://www.hibernate.org/)) make it pretty good alternative to .NET.

kingsdesign
26th October 2008, 02:11 PM
Most of the suggestions posted I completely agree with but it kind of comes down to personal preference.
Are you a real diehard coder than any text editor will do but coda is the way to go for me.

One thing I would like to add is firefox with the firebug add-on (http://getfirebug.com/) installed.
This is great for checking and editing your files on the fly.

harrisonx
26th October 2008, 02:37 PM
im not sure what you mean by this. I use Coda all the time, and i've found it great for managing local/remote copies of files.

Development/Uploading process using dreamweaver is as follows:

1. Connect to the FTP server
2. Open the locally stored copy of the file you want to change
3. Make changes, and hit save
4. The local file that was being edited is saved, and at the same time uploaded to the server

So at the end of the session, you have exactly the same file on the server as you do on your local machine and all just by opening and editing the local file.

On Coda, you do it like this:

1. Connect to the FTP server
2. Open the locally stored copy of the file you want to change
3. Make changes, hit save
4. The local file that was being edited is saved
5. Hit publish
6. The local file is uploaded to the server

OR

1. Connect to the FTP server
2. Open the server copy of the file you want to change
3. Make changes, hit save
4. The server copy is saved on the server, nothing is saved on your local machine.


So, at the end of the session you have either added an extra step in to get a local copy and a server copy, or you have only a local copy, or only a server copy. There's no way to have the same file on your local machine and on the server in one step like there is in DW.

Basically, it's an extra step to have a synchronised copy of a website on my local machine, and an extra mouse click to upload the files to the server.

It's good if you are using your mac as a testing machine, but I often work on a private server for testing, and then get the DNS switched over once the site is ready for launch, so I prefer to work directly on the server. All I need is an option to "upload on save" so I can work on local files, not remote files.

elnewb
26th October 2008, 04:03 PM
Check this article out.

Friday Favorite: Coda + Versions + Beanstalk - The Unofficial Apple Weblog (TUAW) (http://www.tuaw.com/2008/10/24/friday-favorite-coda-versions-beanstalk/)

pengu
26th October 2008, 04:08 PM
Check this article out.

Friday Favorite: Coda + Versions + Beanstalk - The Unofficial Apple Weblog (TUAW) (http://www.tuaw.com/2008/10/24/friday-favorite-coda-versions-beanstalk/)

Coda now has the built-in ability to check-out a repository.