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dodgeavenger2007
4th June 2008, 12:49 PM
Hi,

I was wondering if anybody ever tried to make a DVD-A on mac. I would like to make a DVD-A with the songs I bought on Itunes.

ClockWork
4th June 2008, 01:13 PM
Don't know enough about it.

Try looking at Music Man 2.7 (http://www.mireth.com/pub/mpme.html).

Instructions here (http://www.mireth.com/wt/mpme-burn-dvd-audio-mac.html).

Goodbye
4th June 2008, 01:14 PM
You can burn audio DVDs in iTunes.

In Preferences > Advanced > Burning, and down the bottom it says "Data DVD or CD", I haven't tried it, but I don't think you need to purchase a $25 piece of software to do it.

dodgeavenger2007
4th June 2008, 01:31 PM
Thanks Guys,

I am looking at "Music Man", Please keep posting if you have any other ideas. I will post the solution if I find it and when I find it.

Currawong
4th June 2008, 01:34 PM
Clockwork, that looks like one of those dodgy pieces of software people from China copy, rename then spam our forums with.

What Goodbye said: You can burn a data DVD in iTunes. You definitely don't need to purchase weird, dodgy and unknown pieces of software to do that.

jamesatfish
4th June 2008, 01:48 PM
I was wondering if anybody ever tried to make a DVD-A on mac. I would like to make a DVD-A with the songs I bought on Itunes.

Are you talking about a Data DVD (ie fill a DVD with the MP3/MP4/AAC files from iTunes and play it on an MP3 compatible player or another Mac) or a DVD-A (ie the special DVD audio format with music encoded in PCM format to be played on a DVD-A compatible player)?

iTunes will burn the data DVD no problems, as others have mentioned. The file formats will be exactly as they are saved in iTunes - ie if you have MP3 files in iTunes that's what will be burnt to the DVD. If you have purchased music from the iTunes Store then these files will be burnt in their original format complete with DRM restrictions - so you probably won't be able to play them back on a non-Apple device.

If you are thinking of a DVD-A, then iTunes won't do this for you (unless I am very much mistaken). On the mac the best option I've used is one of Apple's top-end media programs like Compressor (used to be part of DVD Studio Pro, but now part of Logic Studio I think) which will encode your audio as PCM and burn to DVD-A. DVD-A as a format really didn't take off, which is why you'll find the tools for burning such discs as part of the top-end media programs.

Jimbo
4th June 2008, 02:20 PM
toast does it...

dodgeavenger2007
4th June 2008, 02:23 PM
Hey jamesatfish,

Yes, you are right about DVD-A. I am talking about DVD-A (ie the special DVD audio format with music encoded in PCM format to be played on a DVD-A compatible player).

Logic Studio does that but it’s too expensive. I looked at the option mentioned by “ClockWork”, it seems like the right choice, It’s a good priced product. Thanks again guys. I’d like to keep this topic open though, cos I’d like to know more.

decryption
4th June 2008, 02:33 PM
DVD-A (hehe, who's watched Orgazmo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orgazmo) and just had a nice giggle at DVDA), is just a high resolution PCM file. 24-bit/96khz. The songs you have in iTunes probably aren't 24-bit/96khz.

Why do you want a DVD-A anyways?

dodgeavenger2007
4th June 2008, 02:47 PM
"Toast" didn't mention anything specific about DVD-Audio, I will give it a good read though.

dodgeavenger2007
4th June 2008, 02:51 PM
Well, I own a good Marantz DVD-A player and all the stuff I bought on Itunes are my favs, So I want to use them good. Trying to put them on good Media and in a better way and it would be good to know this kind of stuff anyway. :)

astr0b0y
4th June 2008, 03:06 PM
It certainly will be a good thing to learn, but ultimately you will end up with transcoded audio of a lower quality than the original.

MidnightMan
4th June 2008, 03:27 PM
Well, I own a good Marantz DVD-A player and all the stuff I bought on Itunes are my favs, So I want to use them good. Trying to put them on good Media and in a better way and it would be good to know this kind of stuff anyway. :)

As a general response in this thread topic, toast will not burn DVD-Audio. Yes, it does burn DVD music discs but it will not burn to the DVD Audio format that jamesatfish refers to. Toast basically creates a visual DVD that has the music you want as a the equivalent to a soundtrack in a regular DVD. The visual thing toast does is to put the song title and album etc on the screen. Regular DVD's need some visual (a picture or some video) to work. The annoying thing about toast is that the DVD music discs are not gapless. The smallest gap you can put in between songs is 1 second - not good for transferring my original master recording vinyl LP of Dark Side of the Moon. Proper DVD Audio utilises the audio-TS folder (rather than the video-TS folder) and so does not need any visual (picture or movie or something to put on the screen) to work.

Logic Studio i supposed to be able to do DVD-Audio - but people have reported that the discs won't play in DVD-A players and it is very inflexible, ie. it burns one track only at a time, it can't burn a series of tracks into a disc where you can skip from one to the next (unless I am mistaken, but I haven't been able to do it).

There is software for the mac that burns DVD audio where it takes various files and burns them onto one disc to play. It's called 'discwelder'. It comes in gold, silver and bronze versions with the bronze one costing $99 US which will probably do the job.

Having said that - many people are using Toast to create music DVD's that are 96Khz and 24bit - but just be aware these are not DVD-Audio. Rather they can be played on any standard DVD player.

The other alternative I have tried is to use iDVD and imovie. Use these to bring in your music files, put in the chapters where you want to split the songs (good for vinyl LP's) and them send it to iDVD to burn. Again like Toast you need some visual to make it burn otherwise iDVD won't burn it - so get the album art or something as a jpeg file and stick that in where the movie would be. Again, that is not DVD-Audio but it will play in regular DVD players. It's not the easiest method but it will work and the discs will be gapless unlike in Toast.

My opinion is though that there is no point going through this if the music files you have are not 96khz and 24 bit to start with.

dodgeavenger2007
4th June 2008, 03:39 PM
Thanks a lot "MidnightMan", I will look into what you said.

Brains
4th June 2008, 03:41 PM
I agree with MidnightMan; unless the original material was mastered for multichannel or DVD-A to begin with, there's no point. Nor is there much point unless you have the amplifier and monitors to do it justice -- just because you can play DVD-A, doesn't mean you should.

dodge, just stick to creating ordinary audio CDs or run your Mac into your amplifier. All your iTunes purchases will be, at best, CD quality (44 kHz 16-bit).

AvvY
6th June 2008, 07:06 PM
All your iTunes purchases will be, at best, CD quality (44 kHz 16-bit).

Albeit compressed mp3 formats which usually cut off around 15khz in either channel.

BLINDER
6th June 2008, 08:00 PM
DVD-A for an mp3?
Formula One for a trip to the shops in peak hour?
It's pointless.:)

dodgeavenger2007
10th June 2008, 01:59 PM
Thanks a Lot guys. Appreciate the help.

thebag
10th June 2008, 02:08 PM
DVD-A (hehe, who's watched Orgazmo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orgazmo) and just had a nice giggle at DVDA), is just a high resolution PCM file. 24-bit/96khz. The songs you have in iTunes probably aren't 24-bit/96khz.

Why do you want a DVD-A anyways?

Ah decryption you are one sick puppy, you gotta love the DVDA( it is also the name of Trey Parkers band)