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DarkAvenger
16th April 2008, 08:14 PM
I have a video file with a .CDI extension. How do I view the video? I've tried DivX Player, QuickTime Player, MPlayer OS X, VLC Media Player and Windows Media Player, but none will recognise the format (and I thought VLC was supposed to play ANY format!)

A search on the net for .CDI hasn't told me anything useful except that it appears to be a CD format.

purana
16th April 2008, 08:20 PM
Loopback mount the CDI image on Windows using Daemon Tools (and then convert it to another format like ISO which is compatible with OSX) Imgburn should be able to then make an ISO image from the CDI image that has been loopback mounted using Daemon Tools.

Both apps are free

DarkAvenger
16th April 2008, 08:37 PM
Loopback mount the CDI image on Windows using Daemon Tools

OK. Please explain this in English! and what OS X application do I use to do this? I have a Mac not a Windows computer.

purana
16th April 2008, 08:53 PM
OK. Please explain this in English! and what OS X application do I use to do this? I have a Mac not a Windows computer.

CDI format is not usable on OSX unforunately.

If you cannot access a Windows system either physically or virtually, if you can send me the CDI images burnt on a DVD I will convert them.

It's pretty easy, but of course you need access to a Windows host to do it unfortunately. People should stick to using ISO or BIN/CUE images for media. More universally accepted across different platforms.

JaimeSharp
16th April 2008, 09:29 PM
Maconnect (http://www.maconnect.ch/index.php?page=liquidcd&lang=en) try liquid cd it is meant to support cdi

Brains
16th April 2008, 09:39 PM
According to this (http://filext.com/file-extension/CDI) a CDI file can be one of several things (after all, there's only so many combinations of three letter acronyms to go around).

The fact you say it is a video file means it is most likely a Compact Disct Interactive file, an old, somewhat shortlived media format invented by Philips. The only Mac program I know that can read Philips CDI is an old OS9 program called MacVCD.

is this CDI file part of a CD, or a CD that is marked as a CDI title somewhere on the disk orpackaging?

DarkAvenger
16th April 2008, 10:05 PM
It really p....s me off when people encode files in obscure formats instead of the universally accepted formats that everyone can use.

I found reference on a forum to 'Daemon Tools' and OS X:

Is there something I can use to create virtual DVD's from .iso files within OS X. I know Daemon Tools is available for Windows, but I'm not finding anything for OS X
_____

Disk Utility or Toast will do it.
_____

You don't need anything to do it. Just double click the .iso and it will mount the disk image just like Daemon would on Windows.



Is this information helpful or do I still need some way to convert the .cdi file to an .iso file?

Unfortunately I do only have a Mac and unfortunately I can't send the file to you to convert it for me.

DarkAvenger
16th April 2008, 11:12 PM
According to this (http://filext.com/file-extension/CDI) a CDI file can be one of several things (after all, there's only so many combinations of three letter acronyms to go around).

The fact you say it is a video file means it is most likely a Compact Disct Interactive file, an old, somewhat shortlived media format invented by Philips. The only Mac program I know that can read Philips CDI is an old OS9 program called MacVCD.

is this CDI file part of a CD, or a CD that is marked as a CDI title somewhere on the disk orpackaging?

It is a video file and its not part of a CD or an old Philips CDI title on a physical disc. Its a file downloaded off usenet (using aMule). The file is about 450 MB in size. Now why someone chose to encode it in an ancient format instead of as an avi or mpg file I don't know?

Unfortunately my Mac can't natively support OS 9, but I guess I can use Classic under OS X. Will 'MacVCD' be able to play the file 'as is'?

Brains
17th April 2008, 12:36 AM
Ahh, then it's not a Philips CDI, but one of those oddball virtual CD image file-types, then.

Why do they use it? because they are totally clueless and, like many Windows users, will happily use whatever came pre-installed on the machine (and I know that DiscJuggler was once regularly installed on HP and Toshiba computers & laptops for several years).

DarkAvenger
17th April 2008, 03:36 PM
Ahh, then it's not a Philips CDI, but one of those oddball virtual CD image file-types, then.

Why do they use it? because they are totally clueless and, like many Windows users, will happily use whatever came pre-installed on the machine (and I know that DiscJuggler was once regularly installed on HP and Toshiba computers & laptops for several years).

I'd say it's a 'virtual CD' image and not a 'Philips CD-I' file. This being the case will 'MacVCD' be able to play the file? Also you're probably right in assuming 'DiscJuggler' was used to create the .cdi file.

I did find reference in the 'Macrumors' forums about using 'Disk Utility' to burn a copy of a .cdr or .iso file. However I don't want to burn a copy of such a file to a real CD. I simply want to be able to play the file as if it were .avi or .mpg file. Unless .cdr files are meant to be burned onto a real physical CD and put in a VCD compatible DVD player or played back in a software VCD player (like MacVCD) because I'm assuming the file is meant for a VCD player.

Brains
17th April 2008, 05:19 PM
Without access to a Windows machine and/or some software that can look inside a .CDI file, you're not going to know.

Try that LiquidCD app that Jamie mentioned.