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SyncMan
31st March 2008, 04:30 PM
I hope am using the right terminology for what I need.

I thought there was a trick or utility to not delete the first admin user, the 501 user, but reset it so that it asks for new user details. AKA A Fresh install behavior.

Is that possible without deleting the user?

TIA.

Ray
31st March 2008, 04:56 PM
Deleting the file /var/db/.AppleSetupDone may be what you're after. Setup Assistant will again run the next time you start up.

purana
31st March 2008, 04:57 PM
I hope am using the right terminology for what I need.

I thought there was a trick or utility to not delete the first admin user, the 501 user, but reset it so that it asks for new user details. AKA A Fresh install behavior.

Is that possible without deleting the user?

TIA.

You want the machine to prompt for new first user, basically the default out of box experience/demo loop to play.

Do a search on forums.. it's certainly possible, however I do not have the time to link you to it at this point.

But it is possible indeed.

SyncMan
1st April 2008, 08:10 AM
Deleting the file /var/db/.AppleSetupDone may be what you're after. Setup Assistant will again run the next time you start up.

This seemed to have the desired effect thanks, just not sure of what will happen to the current 501 account, will do some testing to see.

dt
7th June 2008, 10:21 AM
Did this work the way you wanted it SyncMan?

Also, were you doing this on a Leopard machine?

Kzach
7th June 2008, 10:43 AM
Is this a way around the whole shortname crap?

I've been wanting to change my computer's shortname for awhile now but it's such a risky and involved process that I've never bothered.

Primarily, I don't want to lose all my passwords for various registered programs.

decryption
7th June 2008, 01:17 PM
Is this a way around the whole shortname crap?

I've been wanting to change my computer's shortname for awhile now but it's such a risky and involved process that I've never bothered.

Primarily, I don't want to lose all my passwords for various registered programs.

Just do a re-install of OS X - it's easier.

chrome
8th June 2008, 12:20 AM
Is this a way around the whole shortname crap?

I've been wanting to change my computer's shortname for awhile now but it's such a risky and involved process that I've never bothered.

Primarily, I don't want to lose all my passwords for various registered programs.

do you mean hostname?

SyncMan
8th June 2008, 10:46 AM
Did this work the way you wanted it SyncMan?

It has been a while, whilst I believe the system asks for a new account set-up, my memory is that you get 2, and the second is not the 501 replacement that I was asking about.

So the question is still really out there, but I have had other priorities, and thought I would leave it for a while.

Any true solution most welcome, but it would be nice to know it really works before I try again.


Also, were you doing this on a Leopard machine?

No Macbook, Tiger able, Tiger is the OS in question.

Brains
8th June 2008, 10:51 AM
do you mean hostname?

No, he means exactly that -- the short name of his primary user account, which is derived from the setup information and is the name of his user directory. That's something that you should never attempt to change; if you do things Break.

decryption is right: reinstalling OSX a'fresh is the recommended way to do it.

dt
9th June 2008, 08:13 PM
Just to close this off -

The way I did this in Leopard was to boot into Single User Mode, then:
• fsck -fy
• mount -uw /
• rm /var/db/dslocal/nodes/Default/users/<shortname>.plist
• rm /var/db/.AppleSetupDone
• rm /var/db/.AutoBindDone
• rm -r /Library/Preferences
• rm -r /Users/<shortname>
• 'reboot' or 'halt'

Taken from How do I reset all users in Leopard? - macosx.com (http://macosx.com/forums/mac-os-x-system-mac-software/296055-how-do-i-reset-all-users-leopard.html).

Worked a charm for me :)

mab
9th June 2008, 09:49 PM
Is this a way around the whole shortname crap?

I've been wanting to change my computer's shortname for awhile now but it's such a risky and involved process that I've never bothered.

Primarily, I don't want to lose all my passwords for various registered programs.

These instructions are for Leopard ONLY

Changing your short username and the name of your home folder

Changing the name of your home folder has ramifications for Time Machine, which tracks files based on their paths. If you change the name of your home folder, the path to every file in your home folder changes, so Time Machine will back up every file again.

Note that these instructions assume your home folder is located in /Users:

If Automatic Login is enabled (in Accounts preferences) for the account you’re modifying, disable it. Similarly, if File Vault is enabled (in Security preferences), disable it. You can re-enable these features, if desired, after completing the procedure.
Log in as a different user than the one you want to modify; make sure the account you want to modify is not logged in.
Open the Accounts pane of System Preferences.
If the lock icon in the lower-left of the Accounts window is “locked,” click on it and provide an administrative username and password; this allows you to make changes.
In the list of accounts on the left, right-click (or Control-click) on the name of the account you want to modify; choose Advanced Options from the resulting menu.
In the Advanced Options screen, delete your current short username in the Short Name field, and then type in your desired new short username.
In the Home Directory field, change /Users/oldusername to /Users/newusername, where oldusername is your original short username and newusername is your new short username. Make note of the original and new paths.
Click on OK and close System Preferences.
Open Terminal (in /Applications/Utilities).
Type the following command, all on one line, and then press Return; when prompted, provide the password of the admin account you’re currently using, and then press Return again:
sudo mv /Users/oldusername /Users/newusername
(These are the original and new Home Directory paths from Step 7; oldusername is your original short username and newusername is your new short username.) This step renames your home folder in the Finder.
Restart your Mac.One specific issue you may experience after performing this procedure is an inability to access Web Sharing for the modified account at http://yourIPaddress/~newusername; (http://yourIPaddress/%7Enewusername;) instead, you may see a "forbidden" or "403" error. If this happens to you,

Open TextEdit.
Click the Format menu and click Make Plain Text. Then click OK.
Copy the below text as is and paste it into the TextEdit document.

<Directory "/Users/myname/Sites/">
Options Indexes MultiViews
AllowOverride None
Order allow,deny
Allow from all
</Directory>
Replace the word "myname" with your user account's shortname. (This is the same name as the user's Home folder in the Users folder.)
Save the TextEdit document on the desktop with the name "myname.conf" where "myname" is the shortname.
At the prompt, click "Use .conf".
Quit TextEdit.
In Finder, from the Go menu choose Go to Folder.
Type in: /etc/apache2/users/
Click Go.
Drag "shortname.conf" from the desktop into the Finder window for (/etc/apache2/users).
At the prompt, click Authenticate.
Enter the administrator username and password and click OK.
Close the Finder window.
Open Terminal.
Enter this command on a single line, followed by Return:

sudo chown root:wheel /etc/apache2/users/shortname.conf
Enter your administrator password when prompted.
Quit Terminal.
Open System Preferences and click Sharing.
Uncheck (deselect) Web Sharing to turn it off, then check Web Sharing to turn it back on.You should now be able to access your web site content normally.

haydio
9th June 2008, 10:00 PM
Good link (http://hackaddict.blogspot.com/2007/07/reset-os-x-password-without-os-x-cd.html)

Found that for the same use. (It involved school and creating a local admin account ;) )