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View Full Version : Drawing plans of the house. What software would you use ?



Martyb
18th February 2008, 11:12 AM
I measured up the outside of the house. Now I want to draw it. I am then going to add the inside dimensions. So what software should I use?

Disko
18th February 2008, 11:15 AM
CAD software is the way to go. If you're a pro, use Windows and Autocad. If you're drawing it up for your own non-pro usage, use a free app like Google's Sketchup. (http://sketchup.google.com/)

gehenna
18th February 2008, 11:37 AM
Visio is good for this stuff if you've got a PC handy

markh
18th February 2008, 11:48 AM
+1 for stetchup.

tazgtz
18th February 2008, 12:22 PM
another +1 for Sketchup

cosmichobo
18th February 2008, 12:31 PM
How detailed are you wanting this to be? For what purpose?

When my fiancée and I are going to re-arrange a room, we just pop onto AppleWorks' Drawing and make a scale representation of the room in question, and any furniture in that room. You have no idea how many fights and bruises this has avoided!!! lol

jonargall
18th February 2008, 12:49 PM
One more vote for AppleWorks Drawing document ... have used it with the last 3 moves and it works great.

cmjl
18th February 2008, 01:00 PM
And another vote here for AppleWorks Drawing features.

My wife started using AppleWorks 4 (Claris Works) back in 2001 to design our 120 sq metre extension. She taught herself how to do rulers, scales, grids etc and after 6 months of on and off hacking had a floorplan that she was happy with and was good enough to take to the person who drew up final plans.

Bart Smastard
18th February 2008, 01:19 PM
I used Sketchup to plan out my (almost complete) extension. The best thing is that it avoids any Mac/PC compatibility issues.

It uses a proprietary file format but you can always export as a jpeg if the other party doesn't have (or refuses to install) Sketchup.

mctext
18th February 2008, 01:34 PM
Used Appleworks for this, mudmaps, etc.
Main advantage is you can save-as/print-to .pdf and send it to anyone who needs to know.
Also the switch from drawing to paint is great if you want to embellish stuff at a later point.
Couple of landscape architects I know do this in AW prior to official CAD stuff because it's quick and easy and gives customers a sketch (but to scale) indication of what they might get later.

mct

avolve
18th February 2008, 01:58 PM
I have used Visio (basic engineering drawings), AutoCAD and CivilCAD (detailed plans) professionally.

I was looking for a Mac equivalent to Visio for some time for similar reasons to the OP.

I guess i will give SkechUP a try...

EDIT: seems to have pretty high recommended system requirements!

Bart Smastard
18th February 2008, 02:08 PM
I have used Visio (basic engineering drawings), AutoCAD and CivilCAD (detailed plans) professionally.

I was looking for a Mac equivalent to Visio for some time for similar reasons to the OP.

I guess i will give SkechUP a try...

EDIT: seems to have pretty high recommended system requirements!

I run Sketchup on my 1.42Ghz eMac and haven't noticed any major performance problems

snark
18th February 2008, 02:56 PM
I run Sketchup on my 1.42Ghz eMac and haven't noticed any major performance problems

Then it should run OK on my mini - I've been looking for something like this for a while. I started using the draw tool in Appleworks, but never got properly going.

iPirate
18th February 2008, 03:21 PM
+ 1 Sketchup.

LarryH
18th February 2008, 03:23 PM
+1 SketchUp

I used it at school and it is so easy to use.

Byrd
18th February 2008, 03:27 PM
I run Sketchup on my 1.42Ghz eMac and haven't noticed any major performance problems

I never knew SketchUp existed, but do now - should come in handy :)

Runs smooth on my 1.5Ghz G4 Cube (albeit with Geforce 6200 card).

JB

Martyb
18th February 2008, 03:36 PM
I''ll give sketchup a go