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Jazarus
7th October 2007, 11:11 PM
Macbook pro owners start saving your pennies :D

http://www.engadget.com/2007/10/06/fastmac-reveals-slimline-2x-blu-ray-burner-for-mac-laptops/


http://img47.imageshack.us/img47/1284/10507blurayfastmacle3.jpg

applecollector
7th October 2007, 11:14 PM
So this doesn't work on the macbook or the Macbook Pro 15" but it works in the ibook? How does that work ?

Jazarus
7th October 2007, 11:43 PM
So this doesn't work on the macbook or the Macbook Pro 15" but it works in the ibook? How does that work ?

I think it's more an issue with the thickness of the machines rather than their ability to run the optical drive

The Fluffy Duck
8th October 2007, 12:08 AM
HD on a laptop. What a waste of time. :(

melted.marsbar
8th October 2007, 12:37 AM
HD on a laptop. What a waste of time. :(

Maybe overkill with the HD, but isn't the capacity of a Blu-Ray disk a lot more than a DVD? That would be useful :)

Joe90
8th October 2007, 12:47 AM
Maybe overkill with the HD, but isn't the capacity of a Blu-Ray disk a lot more than a DVD? That would be useful :)

Absolutely. That's what I'm looking forward to. DV file backups.

When they come down to earth on the prices I'll definately look at one.

morn
8th October 2007, 04:17 AM
HD on a laptop. What a waste of time. :(


Not at all.
Don't forget, laptop screens are pretty high resolution these days. Why you can get a 17" macbook pro with 1920x1200! And on such a high res screen high definition will actually look better than on most big screen TV's. :P
However this is all in vain as there's no software on OS X can can play blu ray disks. It'll only be useful for storage.

iPirate
8th October 2007, 08:18 AM
I thought Toast Titanium had some form of Blu-Ray support... or was that Data only? Not sure.

[MREVO8]
8th October 2007, 08:22 AM
It still takes 25 mins to burn a 25GB Blu-ray disc... R is about $45/disc, RW $50/disc - RDL $90/disc... I haven't yet seen a drive that says it supports dual-layer Blu-ray.

Not only that, but if you burn a disc - you have to hope the next machine you put the disc in (if it's not your own) has a compatible drive.

USB flash/hard disk storage is where it's at.

gameon
8th October 2007, 08:34 AM
it used to take 30 minutes to burn a cd on a 2x burner
so it wouldnt bother me all that much taking the same time to burn 25gbs

wouldnt mind doing an upfrade to the imac when the price comes down a bit

if i remember correctly the 999 was around about what was paid for that same 2x cd burner

stevejay
8th October 2007, 09:03 AM
Never adopt early. A stack of 5 DVD5s costs a whole lot less than a single blu-ray disk when it comes to backups and it's only a little extra work.

applecollector
8th October 2007, 09:52 AM
I agree with you stevejay currently there is not point in buying on of these with the format wars still going and anyways even if it doesn't fit in to a macbook or a macbook pro you can always get an external case.

iPirate
8th October 2007, 10:53 AM
What gets to me on the format wars is that HD-DVD promoters say it has better quality... on a digital format, surely "quality" comes down to size of data storage (Blu-Ray better) and speed you can read that data off...

But all in all, Blu-Ray for Mac = Good :D

[MREVO8]
8th October 2007, 11:22 AM
What gets to me on the format wars is that HD-DVD promoters say it has better quality... on a digital format, surely "quality" comes down to size of data storage (Blu-Ray better) and speed you can read that data off...

But all in all, Blu-Ray for Mac = Good :D

Blu-ray might have more storage space, but I can tell you as an owner of both HD DVD and Blu-ray players - from a consumer point of view, the HD DVD experience craps all over Blu-ray.

iPirate
8th October 2007, 11:35 AM
;371542']Blu-ray might have more storage space, but I can tell you as an owner of both HD DVD and Blu-ray players - from a consumer point of view, the HD DVD experience craps all over Blu-ray.

Ok, that put me in my place. I take that back about Blu-Ray being good.

Maybe we could just hold out for Holographic discs if those start to become serious reality.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holographic_Versatile_Disc

morn
8th October 2007, 03:17 PM
I thought Toast Titanium had some form of Blu-Ray support... or was that Data only? Not sure.

Yep. Toast is a burning program it doesn't playback. :p

Byrd
8th October 2007, 08:00 PM
I'm assuming you'd need pretty hefty hardware requirements to playback Blu-Ray discs via software (when Apple update to this), no doubt a MB/MBP would handle it, but anything less than this will choke I reckon :)

Wait for the hybrid Blu-Ray/HDDVD players I say.

JB

scottgrot
8th October 2007, 08:20 PM
;371542']Blu-ray might have more storage space, but I can tell you as an owner of both HD DVD and Blu-ray players - from a consumer point of view, the HD DVD experience craps all over Blu-ray.

Sorry if I seem a bit na´ve about this; what way does HD crap over Blu-ray? Is it the player unit? User interface? Quality of picture?

I have not ever seen a HD player. And have only seen a Blu-ray player in a box in a shop. I have no idea how different they are to a DVD player.

Thanks

[MREVO8]
8th October 2007, 09:07 PM
Basically, HD DVD and Blu-ray video and audio are practically the same as each other.

In my experience, the HD DVD discs seem to be more consistent in terms of navigation and structure to each other.

The Blu-ray discs I have, the menus are very different from disc to disc... and some discs might use the "green" (or one of the other colour) button to go back - where as in others you have to press a different button.

My Xbox 360 is the HD DVD player... I have a recently released Sony stand-alone as my Blu-ray player. This comparison might be unfair because the Xbox has a heap more processing power than the stand-alone... but HD DVD's take maybe 30 seconds to load. Some Blu-ray discs (like all of the Spider-man movies and Pirates of the Caribbean) take *over* 3.5 mins to load. I've never heard of owners of HD DVD stand-alone players complaining of such long load times.

In terms of DRM, HD DVD has AACS - no region coding (any HD DVD works in any HD DVD player). I have many imported HD DVD discs from the USA and UK. Blu-ray has AACS, region coding and the new "BD+" (recently released discs with BD+ won't play in some players until the user upgrades the firmware... AND it generally increases the disc load time when it does work). Because of the region coding, I have to stick to the small/poor range of titles available in Australia.

HD DVD standard has been feature complete from day one. That means all the features for HD DVD defined in the specification will work on all HD DVD players. HD DVD requires a built-in ethernet port for automatic firmware upgrades... generally they take place in less than a minute.

Blu-ray specifications are not finalised. That means that when the new profile becomes mandatory at the end of this month - the new features defined in that specification wont work on my new $1000 Blu-ray player. I can still watch the actual movie, but I'm excluded from new stuff because I've got an "old" player. Firmware upgrades have to be downloaded and burnt to a disc... and wait up to 30mins (!) for it to update.

And finally... Studio support. Universal and Paramount/DreamWorks are HD DVD exclusive. (Paramount was neutral, but jumped Blu-ray's ship because the manufacturing yield of discs were so low, it was costly to keep heading down that road). Warner Bros. and New Line are neutral. Sony, Fox and Disney support Blu-ray.

In my personal opinion, Universal, Paramount/DreamWorks, Warner and New Line make more of the films I'm interested in. Sony and Fox produce lots of rubbish, but they have a few interesting titles. Disney has Pixar - that's all I'm interested in from them.