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Graham
23rd August 2007, 11:39 AM
I'm considering buying one. Does anyone have experience with them and recommendations on what to look at (or avoid)? I'd prefer a Firewire connection and already have a licence for Retrospect 6. The total amount of data data I need to back up is around 700GB and will change about 2GB a day.

samuelclarke
23rd August 2007, 11:52 AM
Well, if you're after a slow and costly way to backup, get a tape drive. I feel that tape drives have had their day. My recommendation would be to get a good RAID external drive (LaCie have some good ones), cheaper, faster and safer (well that last one's debatable...).

Anyway, don't let me put you off tape backup. ;)

decryption
23rd August 2007, 12:00 PM
Tape backup is good for off-site backups. Less chance of it not being able to fire up than an HDD kept off site too.

I have no idea about drives for Mac OS X though :p

ClockWork
23rd August 2007, 12:00 PM
I've had some... rather unpleasant experiences with tape drives - this being that they half work and half don't - but if you're dealing with 700GB, "half-don't" isn't a happy option.

I know you had a horrible problem with a LaCie Drive - yet there are other brand names, not so well known, that are very beautiful FireWire 400 / 800 / USB 2.0 External Enclosures.

ie:



MantaRay - Oxford 922
IceCube Generation II - Oxford 922
SATA Xpress - Oxford 924DSB
U6 Sohotank - Oxford 912 / CypressOxford 911
Sohotank i302
Taurus RAID - Oxford 924DSB


I retail these, also, if interested.

cheers,

cw

Currawong
23rd August 2007, 12:15 PM
Multiple backups to multiple external or remote hard drives is the most sane option nowadays.

Dubhousing
23rd August 2007, 12:33 PM
I use HP Ultrium cartridges for one server and Sony AIT cartridges for another. They both fail miserably often. I am ditching tapes in the next month or so.

Graham
23rd August 2007, 12:36 PM
It was a Maxtor drive I had the big issue with. The LaCie's have been fairly solid (so far and touch wood!)

I was thinking of tape because it's a lot easier to store them off-site rather than relatively large disk enclosures. However, reliability and the ability to recover data is paramount and I'm starting to get the impression that tapes don't sit confortably in those areas.



I retail these, also, if interested.

When did 'retail' shift from a noun to a verb? :p

I may be in touch (depending on a possible client next week).

marc
23rd August 2007, 12:36 PM
Multiple backups to multiple external or remote hard drives is the most sane option nowadays.
I agree with that (and everyone else!).

Tape isn't the way to go, unless you have very specific needs that fit the way they work.

Very unreliable though... and a pain to restore.

natakim
23rd August 2007, 12:40 PM
I've had some... rather unpleasant experiences with tape drives - this being that they half work and half don't - but if you're dealing with 700GB, "half-don't" isn't a happy option.

I know you had a horrible problem with a LaCie Drive - yet there are other brand names, not so well known, that are very beautiful FireWire 400 / 800 / USB 2.0 External Enclosures.

ie:


MantaRay - Oxford 922
IceCube Generation II - Oxford 922
SATA Xpress - Oxford 924DSB
U6 Sohotank - Oxford 912 / CypressOxford 911
Sohotank i302
Taurus RAID - Oxford 924DSB
I retail these, also, if interested.

cheers,

cw

oh, hello...

what are these going for, i looooove the look, sexy.:o
Sohotank i302 (http://www.stardom.com.tw/sohotank%20st5610.htm)

ClockWork
23rd August 2007, 12:55 PM
oh, hello...

what are these going for, i looooove the look, sexy.:o
Sohotank i302 (http://www.stardom.com.tw/sohotank%20st5610.htm)

Sohotank 4 Bay Hotswap 1U Rackmount / eSATA x 4 / SATA HDD = $749.00 inc GST and 3 year Warranty.

There's also a:

Sohotank 4 Bay Hotswap 1U Rackmount / Firewire 800 / SATA HDD - coming out, yet the price is still TBA.


It was a Maxtor drive I had the big issue with. The LaCie's have been fairly solid (so far and touch wood!)



Was it a Maxtor? I was sure I recalled it as a LaCie... too many ales at the Sydney BBQ, obviously.
I got a LaCie Rugged 2.5" 160GB as a sort of a gift from LaCie, and the little orange fiend died within a month.

cheers,

seedub

Graham
23rd August 2007, 01:05 PM
i looooove the look, sexy.:o

I just hope it writes data more reliably than their advertising copy:

- Connecting four eSATA interfaces to eSATA ports of a host, the system could find out that the four hard drives are dealing with different job at the same time.
- It's more efficient.Four hard drives which can support varies brands SATA 1 or SATA 2 and customers could choose hard drives of their favor or use the original one.
- By installing four 500GB hard drives could get 2 TB capacity.
- Hot-swappable tray module gives the user with convenience of replace hard disk and is not necessary to buy many of unrequisited of external devices.
- Build in with 200 Watts universal power supply which providing sufficient power resources to avoid the burden that brings by the adapter externally.
- The tray module is purchase optional that enable several hard drives use ST5610 simultaneously.
- Can be used under all operation systems which is conpatible with SATA device.
- Via SATA RAID Card to connect two hard drives to be RAID.
- Comaptible with Windows 2000/2003, Windows XP, Linux and Mac systems.

ClockWork
23rd August 2007, 01:18 PM
So... they did the translation through a Chinese to English phrase book...

Also coming up, and sexually arousing:

http://www.siliconmemory.com.au/content/images/revb/e8ml.jpg
http://www.siliconmemory.com.au/content/images/revb/e8ml-content-image.jpg

samuelclarke
23rd August 2007, 01:20 PM
I got a LaCie Rugged 2.5" 160GB as a sort of a gift from LaCie, and the little orange fiend died within a month.


That's weird. I've only had good experiences with LaCie drives - and I have two Rugged drives and a d2. Though as you would know LaCie don't make the drives used in their enclosures - and any hard drive can fail (though some are more prone to it than others).

I've had a few bad experiences with other brands...and I think that it's not so much to do with the HDD, but the build quality (I'm talking about shock resistance here) that is the problem with so many other drives.

Getting back to the topic of backup; I run three copies of just about everything...cloning my HDD onto a 160GB Rugged using SuperDuper!, backing up my work files onto a 80GB Rugged, all of my documents and important work files on my 30GB iPod Video and lastly I have a 2GB flash drive that just about lives on me with crucial files on it - in short, you have NEVER have too many backups (well, maybe you could, but realistically speaking). Ok, I know that you're wanting to backup 700+GB of data...but HDD are cheap these days - you could have two or three HDD backups for not that much money...and if one fails, so what, you still have at least two other copies.

Dubhousing
23rd August 2007, 03:52 PM
Getting back to the topic of backup; I run three copies of just about everything...cloning my HDD onto a 160GB Rugged using SuperDuper!, backing up my work files onto a 80GB Rugged, all of my documents and important work files on my 30GB iPod Video and lastly I have a 2GB flash drive that just about lives on me with crucial files on it - in short, you have NEVER have too many backups (well, maybe you could, but realistically speaking). Ok, I know that you're wanting to backup 700+GB of data...but HDD are cheap these days - you could have two or three HDD backups for not that much money...and if one fails, so what, you still have at least two other copies.

But where do you keep them though. I recently worked out that for 40% of the time all my back up devices were in the same buidling. I need a plastic box and a shovel methinks.

Nuts4Ever
23rd August 2007, 05:38 PM
But where do you keep them though. I recently worked out that for 40% of the time all my back up devices were in the same buidling. I need a plastic box and a shovel methinks.

Yes most of the time there are more onsite backups than off site backups due to rotation.

You need to think back up and rotation strategies. Although Tape did have it's place and is still useful in some rare instances, the best option is to use externals especially with the price dropping all the time.

GRANDFATHER-FATHER-SON BACKUP STRATEGY still works well and one can use different tools to back up to devices with Differential backup instead of tapes or DVD's

In GFS terminology, the DAILY backup is the son and the FULL WEEKLY backup is the father. The last full backup of each month is considered the MONTHLY backup. In GFS terminology, it is the grandfather.

The MONTHLY backup is always permanent--it cannot be reused. It's a good idea to store permanent offsite.

So in this situation three external drives should do the trick buying a new drive on a monthly basis to replace out the grandfather. The new drive becomes the son, the son becomes the father, the father becomes the grandfather. This reduces over all wear on any one drive and any backups are safe off site.

At the end of one year, only one real back up is usually needed for the whole years work and thus the previous grandfathers rotated off site can once again be recycled back in (not including the yearly), thus saving future costs on new drives until there is a failure. For accounting purposes as an example one only needs to keep a 7 year history. For other things such as legal those may be required to be kept indefinitely.

One could go farther and make quarterly, to yearly backups also, but that is usually over kill unless one really needs it.