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wokka59
18th July 2007, 08:50 PM
I want to program the MAC address into my router to enable WiFi Security. About this mac>Network>Locations gives 3 different MACSA for Airport, Ethernet and Firewire. Which one is programmed into the Router Security settings. I'm guessing Firewire?

Regards

Wokka

jubilantjeremy
18th July 2007, 08:55 PM
Why would you guess Firewire? The airport MAC is the one you need to use. You're connecting through Airport..

I reckon that you shouldn't bother with MAC security and just rely on WPA (if you have it - otherwise WEP). Anyone who successfully subverts the WEP encryption - which isn't that hard nowadays - isn't really going to have a problem with spoofing a MAC address. Same goes for hiding the SSID - and in both cases, you're also making it significantly more complicated to connect yourself. My opinion, anyway..

- Jeremy

[edit for clarity]

IIe2PB
18th July 2007, 09:18 PM
I want to program the MAC address into my router to enable WiFi Security. About this mac>Network>Locations gives 3 different MACSA for Airport, Ethernet and Firewire. Which one is programmed into the Router Security settings. I'm guessing Firewire?

Regards

Wokka

In system profiler>network look in the active services pane on the top. Select airport and then in the bottom pane at the bottom of the list is Ethernet and mac address under that.

I think that's the one???

wokka59
18th July 2007, 09:50 PM
Thanks for replying. I meant ethernet not firewire, sorry.. Anyway I'm not using Airport i'm using a Netgear DG834GT.

wokka59
18th July 2007, 09:53 PM
Which of the Location Names do I highlight to get the info- Automatic or Location. I guess the active one? When is automatic used?

IIe2PB
18th July 2007, 09:54 PM
Thanks for replying. I meant ethernet not firewire, sorry.. Anyway I'm not using Airport i'm using a Netgear DG834GT.
Sorry, the airport is the airport within your mac if you have a wireless mac.

If you are using your built in ethernet then select built-in ethernet in the top pane and look in the bottom one for the mac address?

I'm trying to help but I think I'm possibly not understanding the question?

wokka59
18th July 2007, 10:12 PM
I'm not being clear enough. I have a G5 and a powerbook. Also a Netgear DG834GT wireless router. Both have Airport Extreme. I wish to secure my network. In my wireless settings on the router I need to enter the MAC addresses of both my computers.

When the G5 is connected to the ethernet all works fine but when I unplug no connection to the G5 neither it or the laptop I can connect to the internet. I'm guessing trhats because I've put the wrong MAC addresses in the router so it can't connect wirelessly.

I need to know which MAC addresses to enter( ethernet, firewire or airport). I don't have an airport staion per se, only the router/modem/firewall.

Cheers


Wokka

jubilantjeremy
18th July 2007, 10:17 PM
AIrport is the name apple uses for it's own Airport brand, as well as just generic wireless gear. Whenever you see 'Airport' on a mac, it usually just refers to the built-in wireless card.

If you're connecting via Ethernet, then I don't really see the need for MAC access control. Hey, I can hardly see the need for it on wireless.. You have to stuff around with the router every time you want to add a new device to the network.

If you like, I/we can help you to set up WPA instead :)

lie2PB is right about where to find the mac address :


In system profiler>network look in the active services pane on the top. Select airport and then in the bottom pane at the bottom of the list is Ethernet and mac address under that.

- Jeremy

jubilantjeremy
18th July 2007, 10:26 PM
'm not being clear enough. I have a G5 and a powerbook. Also a Netgear DG834GT wireless router. Both have Airport Extreme. I wish to secure my network. In my wireless settings on the router I need to enter the MAC addresses of both my computers.

When the G5 is connected to the ethernet all works fine but when I unplug no connection to the G5 neither it or the laptop I can connect to the internet. I'm guessing trhats because I've put the wrong MAC addresses in the router so it can't connect wirelessly.

I need to know which MAC addresses to enter( ethernet, firewire or airport). I don't have an airport staion per se, only the router/modem/firewall.


That shouldn't be the case, so something's not right with the setup and entering the MAC address again probably isn't going to help.. The router won't require the MAC address to be entered at all by default - so you must have turned that option on. As you must have turned it on, you should probably try turning it off again - even temporarily - to see if it resolves the powerbook's connection, though I don't think that it will.

- Jeremy

IIe2PB
18th July 2007, 10:35 PM
That shouldn't be the case, so something's not right with the setup and entering the MAC address again probably isn't going to help.. The router won't require the MAC address to be entered at all by default - so you must have turned that option on. As you must have turned it on, you should probably try turning it off again - even temporarily - to see if it resolves the powerbook's connection, though I don't think that it will.

- Jeremy

If you turn it off, and you can connect then it's the mac address. On my dlink wireless router if I go into status and wireless then it tells me what mac addresses are currently connected. Perhaps you can get around it like that?

wokka59
22nd July 2007, 09:16 AM
My G5 is connected via ethernet to the router (for faster data transfer) and my laptop by wireless. If I understand you correctly then I should have my Airport MAC settings in the router and the ethernet MAC settings also, for security purposes. is that right? If I then added another distant mac I would have to add its airport MAC too?

Cheers

Wokka

IIe2PB
22nd July 2007, 10:27 AM
My G5 is connected via ethernet to the router (for faster data transfer) and my laptop by wireless. If I understand you correctly then I should have my Airport MAC settings in the router and the ethernet MAC settings also, for security purposes. is that right? If I then added another distant mac I would have to add its airport MAC too?

Cheers

Wokka

All this security is to stop people hacking the wireless side of your router. So, the ethernet connection physically secured (I hope), so your hub won't enable you to have a security protocol (WEP etc) or Mac address filtering for devices connected directly via ethernet. :)

And yes, if you go to hook another mac up using wireless you'll have to add it's mac address to the router as well. Alternatively, if it is just a visiting computer you can connect it via ethernet (blue cable) without your hub caring at all.

Am I helping??

IIe2PB
22nd July 2007, 10:29 AM
Just in case there is any confusion, the term MAC (Media Access Control) address has nothing to do with apple and applies to all devices with network capability including pc's etc.

Read about it on wiki here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_address).

This gent has an excellent site with lots about wireless security etc. Definitely worth a browse of Oz Cable Guy (http://www.ozcableguy.com/).