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jubilantjeremy
11th July 2007, 01:10 PM
Hello,

I'm in the process of setting up an oldish sawtooth to be my newish webserver :)
Previously, I've used a variety of computers booting :

originally, XP (1Ghz)
debian vanilla (333Mhz)
clarkconnect (333Mhz)
debian again (1Ghz)
clarkconnect again (1Ghz)

And now want to set up an os X server on this 400Mhz sawtooth (http://forums.mactalk.com.au/showthread.php?t=32303). It's very light-duty, the most it will do will be to serve some gallery2 pages or SFTP/SMB.

I checked out MAMP the other day and I like the one-click install kind of thing. However, I'm just wondering if there are any advantages or disadvantages to simply installing PPC versions of Apache, MySQL, and PHP separately. I feel I'm up to the task, but I do like the simplicity of MAMP so..

Thoughts?

Thanks and Regards,

Jeremy

conufsed
11th July 2007, 01:34 PM
If this package has all the bits you need, then fine

I'm a developer for a site running php5 & ruby on rails, and its deployed on apache2, so I've got the whole lot compiled from scratch, but I'm using macports.org to speed things up for me somewhat.

One of the things I miss from running linux was apt-get install

Silver
11th July 2007, 02:07 PM
I have a configuration file somewhere that lists all the files I had to download, the configuration settings and compile settings in order to run my server. PM me if you want me to dig this out for you. I have details for MySQL, Apache 2, PHP5, Postfix (with MySQL support), Courier-IMAP, and an Apache like FTP server whose name I've forgotten. I have one for Tiger definitely, and should have one for Panther around somewhere as well. The biggest difference being in how Tiger handles launching daemons.

macpunc
11th July 2007, 02:32 PM
AFAIK, MAMP (http://mamp.info) (Macintosh, Apache, MySQL, PHP) is a virtual ‘Personal’ webserver suite used to develop websites locally and as such will not serve page to the interwebs.


MAMP WEBSITE:

MAMP was created primarily as a PHP development environment for Macintosh computer and should therefore not be used as Live Webserver for the Internet. In this case, we recommend that you use Mac OS X server with the provided Apache or a Linux serve

I think you will need to install and configure Apache, MySQL and PHP on 10.4 server according to your needs to be able to serve pages to the interwebs.

cheers

macpunc

forgie
11th July 2007, 02:40 PM
AFAIK, MAMP (http://mamp.info) (Macintosh, Apache, MySQL, PHP) is a virtual ‘Personal’ webserver suite used to develop websites locally and as such will not serve page to the interwebs.



I think you will need to install and configure Apache, MySQL and PHP on 10.4 server according to your needs to be able to serve pages to the interwebs.

cheers

macpunc
There's no technical reason why a webserver like MAMP would not be accessible from any where else, they are just recommending you don't do it, since MAMP is not built with production-level security or efficiency in mind, it's built with developers in mind.

jubilantjeremy
11th July 2007, 06:09 PM
To be honest, I'm not really that concerned about security - mainly performance..

- Jeremy

Quamen
11th July 2007, 06:17 PM
You will get petter performance if you roll your own.

MAMP is designed for development and ease of use, it's not designed to be used in a production environment. You could do it, but it's not recommended.

BiRDBRAiN
11th July 2007, 08:48 PM
For light use, I don't think you really need to worry about performance tuning.

Besides the MAMP setup isn't that bad. As long as your router forwards to 8888 which is its default port you will be right.

Otherwise you can always dig into the config files and change em by hand.

These days with packages and the speed of machines, I haven't felt the need to compile from scratch since I last ran a BSD unix machine.

I also use MAMP on my local machine, and I quite like it.

jubilantjeremy
11th July 2007, 11:34 PM
Besides the MAMP setup isn't that bad. As long as your router forwards to 8888 which is its default port you will be right..

actually - it very easily lets you change that to port 80 and (whatever the default MySQL port is) - it even has a button that says 'change to server defaults'!

I downoaded MAMP (free) 1.6.1.

Thanks for the info guys, I think I will check out installing those packages myself. I have no need to start/stop servers or change ports or PHP versions etc..

- Jeremy

konni
2nd August 2007, 06:36 PM
I'm a little confused. I've just downloaded MAMP 1.6 but it has 2 folders MAMP and MAMP Pro. I put both of these in apps folder - both appear to be independent of each other. I dont need pro version - can I just trash it? I only want to build and use a mysql database offline.

BiRDBRAiN
3rd August 2007, 09:47 PM
No harm in deleting the MAMP Pro folder, if you have the original install DMG.

When I got it, it only made an MAMP folder.

James
3rd August 2007, 11:06 PM
From Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MAMP):


MAMP was created primarily as a PHP development environment for Macintosh computers and should therefore not be used as a live webserver for the Internet; for doing that, it is recommended that one use Mac OS X Server with the provided Apache software or a Linux server.According to living-e.com (http://www.living-e.com/products/MAMP-PRO/index.php), with MAMP Pro

you can set up any number of servers to carry out tests without danger for your live system. Besides, the local name resolution is performed by MAMP PRO. To simulate a very authentic environment, the MAMP PRO also switches on the local mail server, so that dispatching mails by PHP scripts is possible.

With MAMP PRO, you can easily connect your local server with an existing Dynamic DNS provider, as for example dyndns.com. Making it very simple to quickly make the results of your work accessible externally for superiors and prospective customers. And because you can set up many virtual hosts, you can easily offer alternative configurations or suggestions.MAMP Pro costs US$49.00