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Dubhousing
14th May 2007, 08:24 PM
As some of you may know it's been my misfortune to have given up my work Mac since April (well, actually I bought it from them :D ) and I have been using a PC with Samsung displays. I use an IBM box thing with a decent graphics card but at the end of every work day my eyes hurt and I have a headache. I get home and use my iMac or my Macbook Pro and all is well. I have tried Acer and LG displays as well but every time I get a headache.

Can anyone tell me what is so special about Apple displays - is there a different technology or is it just my immune system reacting to XP as it would to the ebola virus?

tommelbourne
14th May 2007, 08:31 PM
Might sound silly, but could it just be that when you are using your Samsung display you are at work, while when you are using your iMac/MBP you are at home, the difference being different lighting levels or different stress levels, or different lengths of usage?

dangelovich
14th May 2007, 08:33 PM
If you're anything like me, it's a combination of bad posture, and that you're actually working in front of your work computer... I go home with a headache almost every day - yet I can spend the entire weekend in front of my mac and I'm fine. I blame the work.

Also, Cinema Displays have an extra special Apple-only technology: Love :p

Dubhousing
14th May 2007, 08:35 PM
Might sound silly, but could it just be that when you are using your Samsung display you are at work, while when you are using your iMac/MBP you are at home, the difference being different lighting levels or different stress levels, or different lengths of usage?

No, it's not silly. However when I was using my Mac at work for 3 years I had an old 17" Apple Studio display and never had a problem. I'm not alone at work either - headaches are all around. I had thought it was Microsoft's clear type technology but now I'm having second thoughts.

bljpoad
14th May 2007, 08:39 PM
Sorry if this is a silly Q, but are the samsung displays CRT or LCDs? I can't look at CRTs long, I think it has something to do with the refresh "flicker" that LCD displays do not (seem to) have.

mwot
14th May 2007, 08:41 PM
this is interesting. i wear glasses when i'm at work, because i feel so much strain on my eyes from staring at the screen all day and without glasses, i'm prone to headaches.

when i'm at home on my iMac ... no probs.

gelfie
14th May 2007, 08:42 PM
Its probably because os x has fat, Print like fonts and windows has small one pixel wide spindly fonts.

Or if you have "Clear type" on, maybe the slight rainbow around the letters is giving you a headache, try turning it off if it is on.

And no, no difference between apple lcds and anyone elses. Apple use Samsung and LG-Phillips panels in their displays. Mostly the latter. They might pay a little more to get the ones with fewer dead pixels.

But Samsung monitors are very high quality. They make their own panels, have zero dead pixel policies.

Also check to see your video card is driving the display at the displays native resolution. On an 1280*1024 LCD, running it at 1024*768 (or any other resolution) will make it blurry as hell.

Dubhousing
14th May 2007, 09:05 PM
Sorry if this is a silly Q, but are the samsung displays CRT or LCDs? I can't look at CRTs long, I think it has something to do with the refresh "flicker" that LCD displays do not (seem to) have.

They are LCDs

bljpoad
14th May 2007, 09:16 PM
They are LCDs

Right, then I will go the psychosomatic route then ;) I get tired at work, but then I get home and have a beer and can somehow magically do work related stuff at home. Both machines are OS X, work is an intel iMac and I have a macbook (with a Dell display that I use as my main display) at home. Maybe your work environs are the cause, as just tommelbourne, dangelovich and mwot said above? I have not used a PC for an extended period of time in years, so the font issue that gelfie was talking about could be the reason.

Dubhousing
14th May 2007, 09:18 PM
Maybe it's the beer that makes the Mac easier to use?

Brains
14th May 2007, 09:40 PM
It could be "sick building syndrome" that's affecting you, or possibly a high concentration of wireless crap nearby (mobile phone or wireless broadband microtower next to the business, for example, or a plethora of WAPs and wifi-enabled boxes). It could, as mentioned above, be related to posture, or to bad lighting of your office-space.

I strongly doubt it is Windows that's giving you your headaches (painful though it is anyway), but something in your work environment.


B.

gelfie
14th May 2007, 09:59 PM
Brains, usually you're a pretty with it guy.

But "Sick Building Syndrome".

No, I've come up with a better theory. Its all the other workers sending negative vibes your way.

Wear some crystals.

tangent23
14th May 2007, 10:07 PM
re: sick building syndrome
http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/sbs.html

from the US government Environmental Protection Agency website.

Currawong
14th May 2007, 10:21 PM
Are the LCD's at work VGA (analogue) or DVI (digital)? I've gathered that analogue LCD's are considerably more uncomfortable to look at for any length of time.

forgie
14th May 2007, 10:23 PM
Things I would check/consider:

- Posture

- Fluoro Lighting

forgie
14th May 2007, 10:28 PM
Are the LCD's at work VGA (analogue) or DVI (digital)? I've gathered that analogue LCD's are considerably more uncomfortable to look at for any length of time.
That can definitely happen - but it's not noticeable unless the resolution is above 1280x1024 (or you have a really CRAP vga output).

Any reasonable VGA signal into 1280x1024 will look exactly the same as DVI. VGA into 1680x1050 will always look slightly crapper (horizontal contrast ghosting & blurring) then DVI.

Dubhousing
14th May 2007, 10:31 PM
Are the LCD's at work VGA (analogue) or DVI (digital)? I've gathered that analogue LCD's are considerably more uncomfortable to look at for any length of time.

VGA, whereas the Mac was DVI.

g5agogo
14th May 2007, 10:39 PM
Sick building syndrome is a catch all for a variety of conditions usually related to indoor air quality that make occupants feel sick. It's well known and not rare. The actual causes can be diverse and are sometimes very hard to track down. Once I found an administration building at an Australian university where the carpet backing was reacting with a glue that had been applied to produce very low levels of hydrogen cyanide. Everyone in the building had headaches and nausea.

Does anyone else at your workplace feel the same?