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View Full Version : Best free Mac OS X maintainence apps



stefanlod
23rd March 2007, 05:17 PM
The other day, I stumbled on MainMenu (http://www.santasw.com/) - a little app to do a whole lot of maintenance tasks. It's free for version 1, but you'll probably have to pay for version 2. So what other good free maintenance apps do you use?

tazgtz
23rd March 2007, 05:41 PM
I use Onyx, (http://www.titanium.free.fr/pgs2/english/onyx.html) which an easy one to use and its free although you can make a donation. ;)

It's actual version (for Tiger) is 1.7.8. But versions are still available for Panther and Jaguar on the download page (http://www.titanium.free.fr/pgs2/english/download.html).

oscar04
23rd March 2007, 06:01 PM
Are these sort of applications necessary? It has always puzzled me since I switched to Macs whether I needed to do these sort of tasks. I thought they sort of looked after themselves although I do repair disk permissions occasionally. I have no idea what it does but saw someone else mention it once.

Is there a consensus from those in the know? Are these good apps?

Aa
23rd March 2007, 06:10 PM
Are these sort of applications necessary? It has always puzzled me since I switched to Macs whether I needed to do these sort of tasks. I thought they sort of looked after themselves although I do repair disk permissions occasionally. I have no idea what it does but saw someone else mention it once.

Is there a consensus from those in the know? Are these good apps?

Good point actually.

I've been using main menu, and after running the 'Clean Font Caches' task, i can no longer open MS Word.

It is handy for the Dashbpard Client clean out though i guess... Handier than using the shortcut folder method in finder and just trashing the files though? I'm not sure.

Currawong
23rd March 2007, 06:34 PM
Generally speaking, they don't do anything useful. Very occasionally a good cache clean-out can be helpful and can solve issues sometimes.

Aa
23rd March 2007, 06:37 PM
just reaffirm the question,

i just downloaded OnyX and proceeded to open it, and it proceeded to crash my mac for only the second time ever. the first since 10.4.1! One app after another froze until i only had finder left.

Couldn't even do a force quit - had to hold the button for 5 secs and do a hard reboot.

I'm over them

stefanlod
23rd March 2007, 07:59 PM
I'm asking mainly because for one thing, it deleted my Spotlight index and after it had re-indexed, it was way more responsive as were a whole lot of other things... I guess cron does the job most of the time anyway.

tazgtz
23rd March 2007, 08:06 PM
just reaffirm the question,
i just downloaded OnyX and proceeded to open it, and it proceeded to crash my mac for only the second time ever. the first since 10.4.1! One app after another froze until i only had finder left.

Couldn't even do a force quit - had to hold the button for 5 secs and do a hard reboot.

I'm over them

That seems strange. First time I hear of such a thing! Which version did you download? Did you log in as admin on your computer?

To answer oscar04 and Currawong, yes they are useful. Any OS need a bit of cleaning up once in a while.

Currawong
23rd March 2007, 08:32 PM
Any OS need a bit of cleaning up once in a while.

Ambiguous statement that. They are voodoo for most people who run them, as the user usually has absolutely no idea what the functions actually do. Most things they act upon do not need "cleaning up once in a while". Like I stated, things such as caches only need clearing if there are problems.

Some things I have noticed, with Mac OS X specifically:


Font caches can become corrupted, though I haven't nailed down exactly why, so clearing caches can be good fixing voodoo.
HFS+ data can become fragmented severely if you've been running your computer for a few days and the computer has been using virtual memory heavily. This is fixed via a reboot.
Very large files, such as the drives for virtual machines, can become very fragmented.
Directory data (that is, the data that lists where everything physically is on a disk so it can be located quickly) can become disordered on drives that have a a great many (probably in the order of hundreds of thousands) of file entries added and deleted all the time.
Preferences files can become corrupted - that is, the data in them prevents the program running. The Finder seems to suffer from this.
People install or run programs that bugger things up, then ask for help, forgetting what they did most recently that actually was responsible for the mess. I've done this too.

tazgtz
23rd March 2007, 09:00 PM
Sorry Currawong, didn't want to get you upset... :o

English is only my second language. Sometimes I don't have the words to match my thoughts or to explain technical stuff.

For those who use Onyx, just once in a while (every month or so) just click on the Automation script and select the options as in the picture attached. Hope this helps.:cool: