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mctext
22nd September 2006, 04:14 PM
Hi:
Are there any other dock haters out there?
If it were possible to get rid of the darn thing completely, I would.
Meantime, I'm left with my dock minimisation policy.
Get Tinker Tool to put the dock at the top right of the screen.
Then minimise it as much as possible using the drag bar next to the trash.
Then turn it off with Cmd+Opt+D.
The only chance of getting the dock on (short of toggling back with Cmd+Opt+D) is to get your cursor into exactly the right spot at the top right under the menu bar.
(I'd stick a screenshot here if I knew how to add one to an ATAU posting!)

mct

Exocet
22nd September 2006, 04:38 PM
Simply use the "File Attachments" option when you add a reply - you need to use the full reply page to view this, not just the quick reply.

mctext
22nd September 2006, 05:06 PM
Thanks for that.
I've learned about 6 things from ATAU this afternoon!
So here it is -- hopefully!

kit
22nd September 2006, 05:43 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(mctext &#064; Sep 22 2006, 04&#58;14 PM) 216990</div>

Hi:
Are there any other dock haters out there?
If it were possible to get rid of the darn thing completely, I would.
Meantime, I&#39;m left with my dock minimisation policy.
Get Tinker Tool to put the dock at the top right of the screen.
Then minimise it as much as possible using the drag bar next to the trash.
Then turn it off with Cmd+Opt+D.
The only chance of getting the dock on (short of toggling back with Cmd+Opt+D) is to get your cursor into exactly the right spot at the top right under the menu bar.
(I&#39;d stick a screenshot here if I knew how to add one to an ATAU posting&#33;)

mct
[/b]


Interestingly enough, I love the dock. I think I&#39;m one of the few "power users" with magnification still on (albeit only a tiny bit).

What don&#39;t you like about it?

ClockWork
22nd September 2006, 05:44 PM
Here&#39;s a 7th - as there is indeed a nice simple way to kill the Dock.

First open your Terminal - found in: open Apple HD ->> open Applications folder ->> open Utilities folder ->> open Terminal.

In your Terminal window, you want to make yourself the Super User, so after the % prompt, type in:

su

then press your return key.

The Terminal will ask you for your Password to your Apple computer. Type in:

YourPassword

The prompt will now change from a % to a #

So after the # , type in this:

cd /System/Library/CoreServices

then press your return key, and type in this:

mv Dock.app DockOld.app

and press your return key once again.

Nothing will appear to have changed at this point. Simply Quit the Terminal, then click the Terminate button. Click on the blue Apple menu - and scroll down to Log Out...

Then Log back in again - and poof&#33; - no Dock.

If - for some reason, you wish to bring it back, which by the sounds of it, you wouldn&#39;t, the process is reversible. To undo disabling your Dock, once again open the Terminal - and type:

su

Hit the return key and at the next prompt, type in the Password:

YourPassword

Hit the return key and at the next prompt, type this:

cd /System/Library/CoreServices

press return key - and type this:

mv DockOld.app Dock.app

Press the return key - and then Quit the Terminal. Click the Terminate button.

Then simply Log out and Log in again. Your beloved / much detested Dock will reappear.

All that you&#39;ve done, is to make the Dock, as with any other Application, renamed from: Dock - to - DockOld. It&#39;s still there - in CoreServices, yet as it&#39;s been renamed, OS X no longer recognizes it.

The process to make it vanish again - with return pressed at the end of each line - open your Terminal:

su
YourPassword
cd /System/Library/CoreServices
mv Dock.app DockOld.app

return key and Quit Terminal. Click the Terminate button.

Log out. Log back in.

and to bring the Dock back - open your Terminal:

su
YourPassword
cd /System/Library/CoreServices
mv DockOld.app Dock.app

return key and Quit Terminal. Click the Terminate button.

Log out. Log back in.

To those who love their Docks - this might make a good practicle joke for those you work with, and perhaps, may not love so much.

cheers

cw

Addit: Before I forget - which I already have as otherwize I would not be adding this, if you want a substitute to get at your Applications, you can use DragThing (http://www.dragthing.com/) - or create aliases of the Applications and Folders you need there.

Quick way to create an alias of an Application or Folder, is to click on it once - to darken its icon, and then press the Apple :cmd: key - in conjunction with the L key - and you have an instant alias that you can drag to your Desktop.

DragThing (http://www.dragthing.com/) is very good though.

There was something else too... oh yeah - even though this process is reversible as shown, I take no responsibility as to what else is disabled when disabling the Dock. Best to actually write down the condensed procedures.

;)

cheers

mctext
22nd September 2006, 06:12 PM
ClockWork:
That&#39;s fabulous advice.
The Terminal scares me to death beyond SSH and a few other bits.
But I&#39;ll be getting to that this weekend.
No more Dock&#33;
:)


mct

(I don&#39;t support the Dock ... only the Dockers&#33;)

ClockWork
22nd September 2006, 07:19 PM
Mct,

It scares me too - which is why I gave mine pretty colours to make it look friendlier. One can see how the OS X graphic user interface (GUI) - and the Terminal - are simply the same thing - by playing little games with the OS X GUI and the Terminal.

For instance...

Open your Terminal - leave the Terminal window open and drag it to the left of your screen.
Then open your HD -> open System -> open Library -> open CoreServices -> and in the CoreServices folder, locate: Dock

Then click &#39;n drag Dock out of CoreServices and drop it straight onto your open Terminal window. It won&#39;t copy it or anything like that, yet it will show you its pathway - eg:

yourhomefolder% /System/Library/CoreServices/Dock.app

Thus one sees the code behind the graphics.

Still, if you go back to the CoreServices folder and try to manually change the name of the Dock - you&#39;ll notice it won&#39;t let you do it - which is where little bits and pieces of Terminal commands may come in handy, thus allowing you to change things, that on the surface, appear to be in a fixed state.

cheers,

cw

p53
22nd September 2006, 09:13 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(mctext &#064; Sep 22 2006, 04&#58;14 PM) 216990</div>

Hi:
Are there any other dock haters out there?
[/b]
i don&#39;t even know why but it drives me up the wall.
i&#39;ve had it banished to the LHS of the screen but i&#39;ll try what clockwork suggested.

dev_enter
22nd September 2006, 09:15 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(mctext &#064; Sep 22 2006, 04&#58;14 PM) 216990</div>
Hi:
Are there any other dock haters out there?[/b]
I&#39;ve grown to love the Dock. I wasn&#39;t so sure about it at first, but honestly, I can&#39;t really think of any reason not to like it.

bartron
22nd September 2006, 09:30 PM
I can&#39;t say the dock has ever bugged me....It&#39;s just an application launcher (and basic task manager). There are worse options out there....and better ones.

Just like the new wacky XP start menu though I learn to use it...becasue I&#39;m in an IT support role I have to know how to drive a computer which means I have to know how to drive it in the way that 95% of people will....which is the default that came with the computer. Usually this means big fat XP start menu or big fat Dock.

I&#39;ve come across plenty of people that hate the XP start menu as well....a couple of them are coworkers and they still don&#39;t know how to use the default menu properly (and XP is 5 years old already). Same with the dock. One thing I&#39;ve found though is that when you force yourself to use something you will discover the reasons why it was designed the way it was....most of the time they are good reasons (the rest is eye candy).

Bartron.

warren21
22nd September 2006, 09:31 PM
I love the doc to. It gives the OS that wow factor. I wish Apple would give you a couple of options to customise the doc and make it do different things or appear in a different way.

Currawong
22nd September 2006, 09:43 PM
Only problem is, once you kill the dock, you can&#39;t hide applications. If you do somehow hide one, then you can&#39;t select it again unless you have another launcher-type program to select it.

ClockWork
22nd September 2006, 09:48 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(ClockWork &#064; Sep 22 2006, 05&#58;44 PM) 217022</div>
There was something else too... oh yeah - even though this process is reversible as shown, I take no responsibility as to what else is disabled when disabling the Dock. Best to actually write down the condensed procedures.
[/b]

I&#39;ll just draw attention to this piece of ... fine print - you know - just to... cover my ass. It is reversible - indeed, yet deactivating the Dock in this method also deactivates the :cmd: + tab - Application Switcher, stops Mail from automatically checking, kills of the ability to open extra Applications - and a few more pains in the sit-upon area.

In point of fact, Mctext&#39;s method using TinkerTool (http://www.bresink.de/osx/TinkerTool.html) - or a suggestion like using DragThing (http://www.dragthing.com/) - is far more conveniant than using Terminal to kill the Dock.

I suppose that the method I&#39;d out-lined before, really is more of a practical joke more than a thing of practicality.

cheers,

DockWork

visional_studios
22nd September 2006, 10:16 PM
Without the dock, you can&#39;t minimise anything. Which makes multitasking nearly impossible, unless you enjoy having shitloads of windows open at once

Mutters
22nd September 2006, 10:17 PM
You are a different person Clockers, and I believe that&#39;s a good thing

But, the Dock, Clockers.

OK
Now. My experience with Dock has been generally perfect - except those times you go for the extreme bottom-edge of a document and end up being swamped with max "other-world" graphics - frustrationorama - and I&#39;ve got me dock screen bottom.
But, I don&#39;t reckon I could use the system without it&#33;
How the freak am I gunna be able to access every program I ever use without the freaking dock?
Understand that I am a user of OS9, so accessing the upper left of screen beckons - occasionaly.
So, having no Dock would freak me, considerably.
Forgive me Lord, for giving into the GUI.

mutters

Galumay
22nd September 2006, 10:33 PM
i dont mind the dock, i have it set at smallest size, maximum magnification, i only keep a few icons in there permanently. i also use quicksilver a lot, i love QS&#33;&#33;

ClockWork
22nd September 2006, 11:24 PM
Visual Studios,

It also removes the Trash&#33;

And yes Mutters, I myself wouldn&#39;t remove the Dock, yet I can pretend I hate it and want to kill it for good - as is Mctext&#39;s desire.

Now that I come to think of it (and I do), the dumbest simplest answer is more than often, the best.
Why not... simply... remove every single item out of the Dock (bar the Finder and the Trash), go to System Preferences... -> Dock - set Dock Size to Small - uncheck Magnification - choose the Left radio button for Position on screen and check Automatically hide and show Dock. Quit System Preferences.

One could go one step further to put it in a really out of the way place - (using the Terminal :ph34r: ) - by opening Terminal and keying in:

defaults write com.apple.Dock pinning start

Hit return key, Quit Terminal, Log Out... and Log In - and then it&#39;s as tiny as a weazel&#39;s wedding tackle at the very top left of the screen - completely out of site unless one puts one&#39;s cursor to the very far left (won&#39;t interfere with the Apple Menu).

What would be extremely useful, if anyone can work it out, would be to find a way to change System Preferences&#39; Appearance, and change the number of Recent Applications from 50 to let&#39;s say, 150.

?

cheers,

cw

AddIt:

I have another solution&#33; Fairly similar to the one Mct used in starting this thread.

It&#39;s a good short terminal command - it&#39;s reversible - it doesn&#39;t deactivate Application Switching.

1. Have Dock set to Bottom in Position on screen, and Animate opening applications and Automatically hide and show Dock checked. Dock Size and Magnification don&#39;t matter here. Set them as you like.

2. Open Terminal, and type in:

defaults write com.apple.Dock orientation -string top

Press return key, and Quit Terminal.

3. Restart your Apple Mac. The Dock will be gone, yet Application switching will be alive, as will Minimizing - Trashing - and anything else mentioned before, that was deactivated.

To see the Dock, as Mctext used, press key combination: Apple :cmd: + option + D. Use same key combination to Hide Dock.

This could still be used with the action of removing everything from the Dock as mentioned above, in order to really minimize the entire Dock.

If you don&#39;t like it and wish to reverse it, open Terminal and type in:

defaults write com.apple.Dock pinning middle

Restart your Apple Mac.
Note: If your Dock isn&#39;t back at the bottom (or wherever you normally have it), click on the Apple menu, scroll down to: Dock - and across to: Position on Bottom / Left / Right. It will go back to its former position.

Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.

over-and-out

cw

ClockWork
24th September 2006, 01:20 AM
Fully tested last AddIt.

Terminal command:

defaults write com.apple.Dock orientation -string top + Mac Restart

definitely works and indeed, hides the Dock with no ill effects.

cheers,

cw

MacDave
24th September 2006, 07:52 AM
Clockwork -

"su" will only work if the root user is enabled in Netinfo Manager in /Applications/Utilities. On OS X, the root user is NOT enabled by default.

sudo -s is the standard way to drop into a root shell on OS X.

Secondly, when giving advice to new users requiring terminal commands to be executed as root, it&#39;s far more prudent to precede the command with "sudo" rather than dropping into a root shell given that one can get into a lot of trouble when continually executing commands as root if they&#39;re inexperienced, tired, blurry-eyed or whatever.

Thirdly, in several places, you&#39;ve mentioned that the Mac needs to be restarted when when just killing the Dock (killall Dock) and (possibly) restarting the Finder would suffice. Or, simply log back into OS X from the Apple Menu.

Fourthly, you&#39;re not posting links to where you dig up these terminal commands so in some cases, you&#39;re giving potentially dangerous advice without encouraging your "victims" to read about possilbe negative effects nor are you supporting your own position.

Fifthly, I find the Dock is an excellent place to keep Terminal. :P

Dave

ClockWork
24th September 2006, 08:37 AM
Mr Dave - on the points numbered, I agree, however - the first post in this thread - from Mctext (http://forums.appletalk.com.au/index.php?s=&showtopic=25993&view=findpost&p=216990) - requests his desire to kill his Dock. I personally would not remove the Dock.

Secondly, I would not give out ideas that I&#39;d not tested myself to make certain they didn&#39;t cause some irreversable disaster to occurr.

Thirdly, the final (http://forums.appletalk.com.au/index.php?s=&showtopic=25993&view=findpost&p=217436) piece of advice for Mctext works beautifully with no ill effect (with no need to enter as Super User) - ie: without actually killing the Dock, thus without killing the Application Switcher, and he can still use it with TinkerTool (http://www.bresink.com/osx/TinkerTool.html), as well as being able to Show / Hide Dock using the Apple :cmd: + option + D key command.

As to Restarting - I noticed that after a defaults write command is entered, Log In and Log Out should suffice, yet in earlier versions of OS X (Jaguar & Panther), it doesn&#39;t activate, unless Restarted, so in order to cover the full spectrum of possibilities, Restart.

Unless someone asks a question that is genuinely to their own detrament, I wouldn&#39;t consider offering support.

cheers,

Clockers

mjankor
24th September 2006, 09:21 AM
There&#39;s my solution to the dock. It makes it useful and keeps it out of the way. I never activate by accident it except when I&#39;m using Parallels and accidently miss the Window&#39;s "window close" button. Then it gets in the way for a second.

I do however love the dock. I can&#39;t imagine running without one. If Windows played nicely with a dock I&#39;d put one on my work machine too.

Mod Edit: Changed the embedded picture to a link here (http://www.adam.com.au/mjankor/dock1.png).

speedway boy
24th September 2006, 09:45 AM
really people don&#39;t like the dock.&#33; Its the single best thing in my opinion. If I can&#39;t access it via the dock I don&#39;t use it.
Kinda leaves me with one really long dock. hehe. But I love it&#33;

mjankor
24th September 2006, 10:26 AM
50 items in my G5&#39;s dock and 33 in the Macbook&#39;s. :D

ClockWork
24th September 2006, 10:36 AM
Horses for courses, Speedway.

I like the Dock too... but then I also like catagorising jelly babies into the colour spectrum before eating them :)

However, I can see how, in certain cases, it would become annoying, regardless of its position on the screen. At least it&#39;s good to know that one can make it go away, should one need to - as the beauty of X is it&#39;s flexibility for every kind of user.

Mentioned before in Post #17 (http://forums.appletalk.com.au/index.php?s=&showtopic=25993&view=findpost&p=217116) - it&#39;d be real handy to know how to change Recent Application - from System Preferences... -> Appearance - from its fixed maximum of 50 - to something like 150, as although I do use the Dock, I find myself using Recent Items more and more - coming from a Mac OS 7 to Mac OS 9 background, just like Mutters (http://forums.appletalk.com.au/index.php?s=&showtopic=25993&view=findpost&p=217090).

Any ideas on how to lengthen Recent Applications / Items ?

cheers,

ClockWork

The Fluffy Duck
24th September 2006, 01:19 PM
I love the dock. but there are a few programs out there that really Piss me off when using the dock. Lightwave being one of them or any program where you have to wrestle with buttons near the bottem of the screen. I wish they did have a turn off button. But in all fairness its one of the most remarkable beutiful things about OSX

dev_enter
24th September 2006, 01:30 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(ClockWork &#064; Sep 24 2006, 10&#58;36 AM) 217493</div>
Any ideas on how to lengthen Recent Applications / Items ?[/b]
The preference is stored in com.apple.recentitems.plist but if you try to change it to 150, it will just revert to 50 when you log out and log back in.
My guess is you&#39;ll need to actually go deeper and use something like APE or an InputManager hack to circumvent the maximum number of recent Applications.