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newusr
10th August 2006, 02:54 PM
Hello
How do you get OSX Tiger to do weekly, monthly, etc. maintenance checks automatically? Do you need 3rd-party programs to do this, just like Windows, or is there a setting under 'System Preferences'?

What are the manual things to do? I have read something about deleting unused .pref files under ~/Library. Are any used by the operating system?

ClockWork
10th August 2006, 03:00 PM
The simplest manual technique is to Boot your Apple off its Tiger Installation DVD with "C" key down on restart - and use Disk Utility to verify / repair permissions - but otherwise - no - there is no need to do anything unless you start noticing it slow down, or if a genuine problem crops up.

No maintanence required.

cheers,

cw

patcanuck
10th August 2006, 03:29 PM
You can deal with all your concerns by downloading a lovely little program called MainMenu :)

mctext
10th August 2006, 03:58 PM
Re. MainMenu:
The latest version (1.5.5) downloads OK, but it doesn't seem to work -- at least not on my G4 PB.
When I double click on the icon, the app doesn't open.
Having trashed the app and the .dmg file, the trash won't empty because it says both of these are in use!
Anyone else have this problem?

Hamsmyth
10th August 2006, 04:00 PM
What does MainMenu allow you to do?

I know a lot of ex-windows users (myself included) feel a little uneasy just letting things go on without maintenance. Maby we just need more faith in the mac.

The Architect.mac
10th August 2006, 04:01 PM
i beleive your mac runs scripts periodically to clean itself and repairing permissions is always touted as worthwhile, but Onyx also has a good reputation and i use it every 3 months or so, its also universal binary...

edit - mctext, just restart and then empty the trash...

melbmac
10th August 2006, 04:04 PM
I never really do anything, used to use techtool, but kinda just stopped and have had no dramas.

stefanlod
10th August 2006, 04:09 PM
What you're referring to as "daily", etc. are the cron scripts that OS X runs at 4 am or something. You can run these manually by typing in a terminal (w/o quotes) "sudo periodic daily weekly monthly". If you like, you can omit a word if you only want to do one. It will then leave the blinker going until it finishes, when it will just return you to the shell. So don't think that it's hung! It may take some time so be patient.

But for a nice GUI frontend to these and some other nifty OS X maintenance tasks, I suggest you get Cocktail (http://www.maintain.se/cocktail/), which can clean out caches and other stuff. But then again, this stuff isn't really necessary as you don't need to maintain a mac to keep it working in optimal condition, but you may want to do it for whatever reason.

edit: might I add that a full version (i.e. paid) of Cocktail will do a variety of maintenance things automatically when you specify.

kit
10th August 2006, 04:27 PM
<div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(stefanlod &#064; Aug 10 2006, 04&#58;09 PM) 203424</div>

What you&#39;re referring to as "daily", etc. are the cron scripts that OS X runs at 4 am or something. You can run these manually by typing in a terminal (w/o quotes) "sudo periodic daily weekly monthly". If you like, you can omit a word if you only want to do one. It will then leave the blinker going until it finishes, when it will just return you to the shell. So don&#39;t think that it&#39;s hung&#33; It may take some time so be patient.

But for a nice GUI frontend to these and some other nifty OS X maintenance tasks, I suggest you get Cocktail (http://www.maintain.se/cocktail/), which can clean out caches and other stuff. But then again, this stuff isn&#39;t really necessary as you don&#39;t need to maintain a mac to keep it working in optimal condition, but you may want to do it for whatever reason.

edit: might I add that a full version (i.e. paid) of Cocktail will do a variety of maintenance things automatically when you specify.
[/b]


Just to be clear; stefanlod is saying (quite rightly) that Apple already include automatic maintenance events in OS X. They run at weird times of the night, though, so if you turn your Mac off at night, you should consider occasionally running "sudo periodic daily weekly monthly" (no quotes) to force the computer to run the event (if you&#39;re experiencing slowdowns and things).

A restart once in a while is great too, if you have a small HDD and a big swap file.

Mctastic
10th August 2006, 04:47 PM
i recon there is one thing you need to check on ,... .if you are experiencing slowdowns, disk related stuff. reboot, hold down Apple + s. ou get a unix prompt. type &#39;fsck -f&#39; then return/enter.
this checks and repairs your disk partition(if it doesn&#39;t/can&#39;t, then you know it&#39;s time to backup, format, reinstall). if you moving volumes of stuff, on and off, editing on your main drive(system disk), this is important.

El Guardo
10th August 2006, 04:55 PM
As noted above, Onyx can perform the periodic maintenance scripts either manually or, in the most recent version, according to a schedule which is determined by you. And, please, do not concern yourself with repairing permissions... (http://daringfireball.net/2006/04/repair_permissions_voodoo)

MacDave
10th August 2006, 05:18 PM
One can edit these three files on Tiger to change the times when the periodics run:

[Isis:/System/Library/LaunchDaemons] root#

com.apple.periodic-daily.plist
com.apple.periodic-monthly.plist
com.apple.periodic-weekly.plist

In versions of OS X prior to Tiger, the periodics are run in cron and their times can be changed by editing /etc/crontab

The BEST free maintenance utility out there is AppleJack which runs in single user mode.

http://www.macupdate.com/info.php/id/15667

Using AppleJack, you can repair your disk, repair permissions, validate the system&#39;s preference files, and get rid of possibly corrupted cache files. In most cases, these operations can help get your machine back on track. The important thing is that you don&#39;t need another startup disk with you.

Dave

patcanuck
10th August 2006, 08:31 PM
Sorry to hear about your problems with MainMenu. I only suggested it as the result of hearing about it on another thread and following up on it. I have the same version as you downloaded and have absolutely no problems with it ............on a macbook, though running the latest version of Tiger.

thorntonp
10th August 2006, 08:39 PM
try macaroni...

http://www.atomicbird.com/ (http://ww.atomicbird.com/)

does all the maintenance and lets you remove localised files - great for a notebook - removes all the supurfluos language packs saving space

works flawlessly, and I have it on my 3 machines

bullrout
10th August 2006, 08:55 PM
A second for macaroni. I have used it for years & it&#39;s great. Set & forget.

newusr
10th August 2006, 10:02 PM
I did a search under Apple&#39;s Tiger forum and found below link for maintaining OSX
http://www.thexlab.com/faqs/maintainingmacosx.html

Under "Running Mac OS X Maintenance Scripts", it mentions what is quoted so far. It also states that when the machine is off during its maintenance time 3-5am, it generates log files, that accumulates over time consuming disk space. Where are these files kept?

I have downloaded Cocktail. As I am also using a PC, I am in the habit of doing maintenance activities, especially when I end up removing files/programs, which left unchecked over time causes problems.
Anyway, thanks for all the advice so far.
B)