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MacintoshSE
29th April 2014, 05:53 AM
Flame suit ON :

I'm sure some will not approve of the idea, which I guess I can understand, but at least it's not a MacQuarium and it gets used everyday.

I'll keep this short

I removed the original components and put them away for a rainy day. I cut an alloy plate in the same shape as the analog board to mount a small 200 watt power supply. The LCD screen is a 9.7" iPad 2 panel. It is very similar to the original CRT dimensions, I only had to machine about 8mm per side out of the original case as well as make the case 'flat' so the LCD sat flush against it. The LCD is driven by a VGA>LDVS converter board. The motherboard is a mITX sized Gigabyte board with a Celeron C1037U processor. I'm using a Griffin Imate to retain the original ADB keyboard and mouse, with a small modification to allow the soft power button to be used to turn the machine on and off. There is also a small stand alone audio module and speaker inside the case to play the original Mac SE startup chime.

In order to keep the case looking somewhat original - The 4 USB ports, audio in/out and Ethernet port are acessed on the back of the case using the original expansion board opening. The keyboard plugs into the original position using the original Mini Din 4 socket. I have made a dual SD card reader to fit in the lower floppy drive slot, but I'm not sure if I will bother to fit it.

The machine runs Kubuntu for the OS and it gets used daily for Android app development. I also run the Basilisk Mac emulator on it.

The screen resolution is 1024x768 and can also display 800x600. When running the Mac emulator I prefer to use 800 x 600. I use 1028 x 768 when doing daily work with Kubuntu.

I got a piece of 2mm glass cut that same size as the LCD panel from the local glazier for $4. This is attached to the front of the LCD to protect it and make it easier to clean.

Maybe someone will find this useful if they are looking to do something similar.


Starting off with the powersupply mounted and the rear panel made.
http://i1314.photobucket.com/albums/t575/MacintoshSE/IMG_0190_zps058cd734.jpg


Milling the front case slightly larger and making it 'flatter' so the LCD fits flush.
http://i1314.photobucket.com/albums/t575/MacintoshSE/IMAG0211_zps6af37042.jpg


Most of the electronics fitted up
http://i1314.photobucket.com/albums/t575/MacintoshSE/photo2_zpsda5ff4eb.jpg


First run, the yellow wire across the rear of the LCD is there to keep the LCD cable sitting flat against the panel. The connector that is used seems quite delicate and I didn't want it to become strained at all.
http://i1314.photobucket.com/albums/t575/MacintoshSE/xzxczv_zpsb7f1a0ae.jpg


Running the Basilisk emulator at 800x600
The picture quality is much clearer/crisper than the photo shows
http://i1314.photobucket.com/albums/t575/MacintoshSE/IMG_0118_zpsd52024d0.jpg

glacierdave
29th April 2014, 06:32 AM
Nice mod.

jsarchibald
29th April 2014, 07:19 AM
Wow, looks nice! As long as you keep the internals, there are plenty of SE's that you can always get the case and transplant back in.

I don't think most people would be upset by what you've done, unless you had disposed of the internals of a working machine.

Plus SE's are not super rare (do a search for the Drexel Mac on eBay that has been modded to be a Windows XP machine, and you'll see some flame wars!).

Great job, looks awesome! Would love to see that in person.

Oldmacs
29th April 2014, 12:37 PM
Awesome!! I find these things so cool :D

BTW- Welcome to Mactalk!!

MacintoshSE
30th April 2014, 05:43 AM
Thanks for taking a look. It's nice to be able to use it again as a real workhorse, even if it's not quite original. I have owned a Mac Plus since new with an Ethernet>Serial adapter, so I can get onto the net the 'old way' if I feel the need! :innocent:

tim
30th April 2014, 11:08 AM
Well done. Great to see these computers still getting used for something meaningful- even if it's souped up a bit!

Pismo
30th April 2014, 05:42 PM
Now that looks fantastic just shows what can be done with old macs to give them a new and practical life what your next project

MacintoshSE
30th April 2014, 06:46 PM
Now that looks fantastic just shows what can be done with old macs to give them a new and practical life what your next project

For the next 'project' it will be software based. I am impressed with some of the other recent work done on the vintage Mac scene with the likes of the Floppy Emu and SCSI2SD etc..... These really have filled some big gaps getting these older machines back into the modern world. So I figured it would great if there was some new software written for the older 68k machines that take advantage of getting their second wind.

I'm writing a MOD (Amiga sound format) player/tracker for my Mac Plus. There probably isn't much interest for that other than me and a few others trapped in the 80s. After the MOD player is done, the next program will be a game (with an option for multiplayer across Appletalk) I thought about utility programs etc but I think there are plenty of decent existing ones out there that do most things!

jsarchibald
1st May 2014, 09:32 AM
If you want to get into modding, check out the 68kmla if you haven't already, lots of modding ideas there.

jeremybh1
5th May 2014, 12:10 AM
This post has made my day! I wish I had one - truly I do!

MacintoshSE
5th May 2014, 12:16 PM
If you want to get into modding, check out the 68kmla if you haven't already, lots of modding ideas there.

Yes, I've had a look on there. Certainly a lot of interesting stuff going on!


This post has made my day! I wish I had one - truly I do!

I hope to make a quick video of it soon to put on YouTube.

neoxide
5th May 2014, 01:30 PM
I'm writing a MOD (Amiga sound format) player/tracker for my Mac Plus. There probably isn't much interest for that other than me and a few others trapped in the 80s. After the MOD player is done, the next program will be a game (with an option for multiplayer across Appletalk) I thought about utility programs etc but I think there are plenty of decent existing ones out there that do most things!

I've been meaning to look into running a tracker on an Amiga for a while, but since I'm not as experienced with Amiga hardware as macs I tend to put it off... Something similar on a Mac would be really interesting, especially if you can create new compositions. I make music in my spare time and I've been looking to include old macs in my live performance set up. I recently recapped a Classic II to run a simple sequencer, which is on YouTube... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZxK2RSJJKU

jsarchibald
5th May 2014, 05:54 PM
Must say I'm quite pleased to see that no flaming has occurred. I think the way you've done it, and the only non-reversible alteration is the front bezel, should be commended.

kim jong il
5th May 2014, 07:50 PM
Nice work; cool idea, it sure beats putting into the tech waste bins at those collection sites.

tomwazere
5th May 2014, 08:34 PM
This is very nice!!

hijack
6th May 2014, 10:10 PM
It is so much like Hot Rodding. Get the classic chassis and soup it up to look great and perform better than new. No guilt in that!
Well done!

MacintoshSE
14th May 2014, 04:53 PM
Must say I'm quite pleased to see that no flaming has occurred.

Me too! :D


I've been meaning to look into running a tracker on an Amiga for a while, but since I'm not as experienced with Amiga hardware as macs I tend to put it off... Something similar on a Mac would be really interesting, especially if you can create new compositions. I make music in my spare time and I've been looking to include old macs in my live performance set up. I recently recapped a Classic II to run a simple sequencer, which is on YouTube... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WZxK2RSJJKU

Yes, you can compose your own MOD files with my program. It's very much like the old ProTracker interface. There are already some MOD players/Trackers for the Mac. Sound Trekker (Player) and PlayerPro (Player/Tracker) are two that I know of, but they require at least a 68020 (Should be ok to try on your Classic ii Neoxide).... Since these programs won't run on a 68000, I'm writing my own for the MacPlus.

MacintoshSE
15th June 2014, 10:28 AM
Just an update on the original SE bits. I was given a sad SE a few weeks ago and I decided to take a look at it. It was a single 800k with an internal HD. The HD sounded like it was on it's last legs and the CRT had a fair bit of burn-in. The +12v rail also seemed to dip by around 1v when the floppies were being accessed...

I swapped the CRT, analog board/PSU and hard drive with the original ones that I had taken out of SE LCD donor. I also moved the hard drive with an aftermarket mount so I could add a second floppy drive.

So now it has dual 800k floppies, a 80Mb HD and 4Mb of RAM.

I feel less guilty about my LCD conversion now!

http://i1314.photobucket.com/albums/t575/MacintoshSE/IMG_0444_zpse9fa2f2d.jpg

http://i1314.photobucket.com/albums/t575/MacintoshSE/IMG_0446_zps1ec381c1.jpg

macman142
17th June 2014, 04:11 PM
Excellent!

I have an SE with the identical aftermarket hard drive, bracket and all. Interesting hey!

What did you do in order to mount the second (upper) floppy drive? In SE's with original dual floppies, I think there was a small metal plate to mount the upper to the lower. Did you make something?

MacintoshSE
17th June 2014, 05:03 PM
The hard drive bracket is very neat, it looks like it belongs there! I wonder if they were made locally in Aus?

The SE that I used for the LCD conversion had dual floppies fitted from new, so I just used the factory brackets to put them into this one. I remember using my Mac Plus back in the late 80's with a single 800k drive and no hard disc for about 2 years before I managed to afford a second hand 20MB hard disc (I was at high school) I feel spoilt now in comparison! :-)

Orestes
17th July 2014, 01:13 PM
Now to run OS X on one of these things legitimately and turn into a daily use computer.