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iMic
7th June 2013, 11:09 PM
Well, I'm saddened to report the steady decline in health of my 2012 CTO MacBook Air. It was a wonderful machine straight out of the packaging, sleek and shiny with plenty of punch. Configured with 8GB of RAM and a 512GB SSD, this was a present to myself after years of saving and making do with second hand machines and piles of spares to keep them running. The RRP was $2499 when this machine was brand new, and it was a moment of joy when it arrived home for the first time.



Last year, the machine began developing an intermittent graphics lockup. After weeks of troubleshooting what appeared to be an issue with the Intel HD Graphics 4000 extensions, the decision was finally made to have the Logic Board replaced by Apple. The replacement board arrived without issue, however I immediately noticed the board was covered in solder flux that hadn't been cleaned correctly. After a long time without a functioning unit, I allowed this provided the board was cleaned and that I would have the assurance of Apple that the component was up to their standards. With the replacement Logic Board in place, the intermittent lockup vanished, and I was back in business.

Perhaps only a week later, the rubber jacket on the cable of my MagSafe 2 Power Adapter split. After some deliberation and a lot communication, including an exchange of photographs with Apple, they agreed to replace it. They never seemed convinced that I hadn't caused the damage myself, but I had been noting what appeared to be deterioration of the rubber material over time and was able to supply sufficient evidence to the contrary, so the replacement went ahead as normal. The replacement adapter works, nothing more to it. I was satisfied.

A week ago, the L key leapt off my Keyboard while I was typing out a rather lengthy forum post. I was able to press it back down and it seemed to latch in without issue. An unfortunate but rare occurrence. That is, until tonight, the L key has once again jumped off my keyboard while typing into a chat. It appears the plastics may not be in the best of condition. Not good. This will now need to be looked at and a replacement cap kit or keyboard will need to be ordered.

Tonight, I was disappointed to discover that my Battery is now failing. Exactly as I predicted it would based on its steady decline from a solid 98% health to now being level at 80%. With this, the computer has begun to report "Service Battery" and is now failing battery diagnostics, indicating that the battery has in fact gone bad. It's hardly been left to deteriorate either, always properly cycled as per Apple's recommendations for battery maintenance and now sporting a healthy 236 cycles of a total 1000 as it falls just shy of its first year anniversary by a matter of weeks.

In addition, I have noticed some intermittent tracking with the Multi-Touch Trackpad, however this is still being investigated and for the time being I'm assuming it was a fluke, and that the part is functioning correctly. However if I find any evidence to suggest the cursor is tracking erratically, I'll add it to this list.




This machine has steadily fallen apart from the moment I opened the box. I could be mad at this fact, but I choose not to be. I'm saddened, disappointed more than anything that this happened to a machine that I purchased because I was becoming stressed with old, tired, unreliable machines - yet those machines proved to be more reliable than this MacBook Air has been. It's a shame, to say the least. It was my intention right from the start to take care of this machine, and I most certainly have - including an investment at the point of purchase in an STM Jacket 13" in which to keep it in, dedicated microfiber cloths, iKlear cleaning solution and a slim felt keyboard cover to protect the display when closed. Physically, it's in fantastic shape. Electrically and mechanically, it hasn't lived up to expectations.

What complicates matters is that I can't trust the machine. They can replace the battery, replace the Top Case / Keyboard / Key Kit, but it doesn't guarantee longevity on a machine, even more so with the track record that this machine has. Add to that the fact it has a refurbished Logic Board that wasn't cleaned properly when it was remanufactured and I'm beginning to think that this machine is destined to let me down sooner rather than later.

Honestly, after all the hands that have been inside it, all the parts that have been swapped out of it (and still need to be swapped out) and the wear on screws and brackets from repeated removal and reinstallation, I'm thinking a call to Apple Customer Relations is in order. I want to trust the machine, I want to love it and enjoy using it, but for this unit, the magic has worn off and concern now fills its place. So perhaps it's time to start requesting a replacement.

I have my own ideas on how to proceed, but I also want to get some feedback on how I should approach this.


Cheers,
~ M.

Oldmacs
7th June 2013, 11:38 PM
I sympathise with you....... As you know my Macbook hasn't been all that reliable and I am scared to death that it is just going to die again.

I know what you mean about the replacement parts. My theory is that often these sorts of things are caused by something really obscure, that is not replaced. Apple then replaces the broken parts and the problem causes more issues. If I were you I would be demanding a new Macbook. My Macbook's battery has also dropped under 80 percent health. Apples website says this should not happen till 1000 charge cycles and I am at 296 charge cycles after 10 months. However the genius bar says that it is perfectly fine.

Like you I bought the machine to trust it with Year 12 and later university. I also want to love it. However I worry a lot through my assessment blocks that it will die out. And personally having to modify what I do because Apple is providing rubbish customer service is not at all good enough.

It annoys me a lot that Apple will attempt to shift the blame of a problem that is their fault onto something else. I was told that my Macbook being completely dead for two days with a completely drained battery and no signs of life was either my 'outdated' software or 3rd party ram, when it is obviously wrong.

If I were you I'd try a letter to Apple expressing all of this. I haven't gotten around to sending one of my own yet but I will at some stage soon, as at least in my experience the genius bar could not care less.

midnight_e
8th June 2013, 12:21 AM
Really don't think a letter is the way to handle this.
Letters can just be ignored (personal experience here).

My view is that you would get a better result with face to face complaining/discussing problems. It's just having the right attitude, and, the tricky bit, getting the right person to talk to.
When I say having the right attitude, I mean not going in with guns blazing.
I think a mindset where you go in saying 'I have a problem here, how can we solve it', this kind of attitude has resulted in me getting two out of warranty repairs.

Oldmacs
8th June 2013, 12:37 AM
Don't get me wrong, I always go in (With an adult) with a very positive mind set. I always try and mention my Apple collection, subtlety praise Apple devices and am polite. However I am onto going in for the 4th time now. 4 different people. They just don't listen.

glacierdave
8th June 2013, 06:40 AM
The phrase you need is "Can I talk to your supervisor?".

Be ready to repeat that with each person you talk to until you reach a point where you can get a result you're happy with.

This may quickly go beyond a store level and that might mean you need to talk to the AppleCare folks on the phone instead. Even then, same thing applies.

Hope it gets you somewhere.

David

iMic
8th June 2013, 09:23 PM
The "Service Battery" indicator was only appearing intermittently, but now it looks to be quite permanent. Battery health has fallen from 81%, to 80% last night, to 76% this evening. I took several screenshots in case it doesn't appear when Apple does eventually look at it.

http://i40.tinypic.com/3096gpe.jpg

bennyling
8th June 2013, 11:36 PM
Does AST say the battery is consumed or faulty?

What's the rule for replacement machines? 3 major repairs? With a logic board and battery, you're pretty much there with a little coercing, you might be able to convince a Genius or AppleCare rep to replace your machine. Not sure how you'd go with giving Apple a sob story, but you've explained your case pretty well. Doing the same over the phone or in-person might yield favourable results.

As an aside, do Apple Stores replace faulty machines as often as phone support seems to? Maybe I'm biased because we don't have an Apple Store in Tassie, but most of the replacements I've heard of come via phone, not in-person.

wolfie
9th June 2013, 12:29 AM
Personally I wouldn't play nice. Ill be upfront and politely demand a new one because its only been 11 bloody months!
Tell them the history with this machine and you expect and purchased a brand new machine with functioning components from the get go, not some band aid fix it job after such a short time.

Sometimes a spade needs to be called a spade and you make it clear this is unacceptable from Apple.
If they don't like it, go to the Ombudsman ( and let Apple know that too).

Theres only so much playing nice will get you. Ill be pissed off at the time you have spent travelling for this bloody machine.

iMic
9th June 2013, 07:03 AM
Does AST say the battery is consumed or faulty?

What's the rule for replacement machines? 3 major repairs? With a logic board and battery, you're pretty much there with a little coercing, you might be able to convince a Genius or AppleCare rep to replace your machine. Not sure how you'd go with giving Apple a sob story, but you've explained your case pretty well. Doing the same over the phone or in-person might yield favourable results.

As an aside, do Apple Stores replace faulty machines as often as phone support seems to? Maybe I'm biased because we don't have an Apple Store in Tassie, but most of the replacements I've heard of come via phone, not in-person.

It's currently reporting "Battery Bad" in AST. Health is below 80%, but well below 1000 cycles.

I'll have to have a chat with them. Having dealt with Apple before numerous times my experience has been a 50/50 split of success and no success when it comes to negotiating a solution, but this time I'm determined to reach a satisfactory solution. Should be interesting to see what happens.



Personally I wouldn't play nice. Ill be upfront and politely demand a new one because its only been 11 bloody months!
Tell them the history with this machine and you expect and purchased a brand new machine with functioning components from the get go, not some band aid fix it job after such a short time.

Sometimes a spade needs to be called a spade and you make it clear this is unacceptable from Apple.
If they don't like it, go to the Ombudsman ( and let Apple know that too).

Theres only so much playing nice will get you. Ill be pissed off at the time you have spent travelling for this bloody machine.

11 months is definitely much too soon to be seeing major malfunctions. Especially considering the first of these issues began at around the 4 month mark. I agree completely in that I don't want to attempt a second band-aid repair. These machines can be repaired, but repeated removal and reinstallation of parts does result in unnecessary wear and tear. I'm not sure this machine will handle another complete teardown.

I'm positively awful at being an irate customer, since I usually end up having a light conversation with the customer service agent. :laughing: If I have to seek advice from the ombudsman I will, but hopefully Apple can make this right without it becoming too much of a challenge.

leon
9th June 2013, 07:53 AM
I had an issue with the bluetooth in my 2009 Mac Pro in 2010. After having a technician come and replace the module twice the problem still persisted.

I sent an email to Steve Jobs outlining what I thought were failings in what is their flagship machine. Within 24 hours I received a response and a phone call from the USA. The US engineers phoned me and had me run some diagnostics that they sent me.
I was also put in touch with a high level apple customer service rep here in AUS who helped coordinate efforts between myself and the US.

About a week later I received a replacement case from the US engineers which solved my BT reception issues.

Perhaps try an email to Tim Cook.

iMic
11th June 2013, 12:38 PM
Spoke to Apple briefly earlier today. They've directed me to an Apple Retail Store to have the machine inspected, but I was under the impression that they would push for a repair rather than a replacement. Considering the amount of work that has been done and would need to be done to resolve all the problems this machine has, I'm not keen on the repair option.

Oh, and the Trackpad was behaving erratically the other night. Wonderful.

Will let the Genius Bar have a look at it but if we can't reach a satisfactory conclusion I may have to consider other options, I'm afraid.

kevinnugent
15th June 2013, 07:16 PM
So, how'd you go?

iMic
15th June 2013, 11:12 PM
Haven't made it to the Genius Bar yet. Being made redundant and having a car that decided now would be a brilliant time to blow its engine made that quite difficult. I'm hoping to make it in there early next week though.

iMic
20th June 2013, 02:06 AM
Booked for Saturday at the Rundle Place Apple Store. We'll see what happens.

iMic
22nd June 2013, 01:38 PM
Apple declined the repair. Being an intermittent fault it didn't fail AST when it was on the bench, so the battery was deemed to be in good health. Showed them the screenshots but it didn't sway the verdict. I phoned AppleCare who advised me I would need to reproduce the intermittent fault between now and Monday otherwise there was nothing they could do - my existing research, screenshots and proof are null and void. The Apple Store apparently "has the final decision", and AppleCare has "very little power to override their verdict" no matter how unreasonable it may be, according to the agent I spoke to.

Worst of all, I know it's not true, as Apple Customer Relations does have the power to make that call. I'll be attempting to speak to them on Monday.

In addition, I was advised the lifting of the key cap was likely due to it not being seated correctly, despite the fact I have had the key properly reseated about three times, but it never holds. At this point it shifted from being a seating issue to more in the realm of tampering. Under no circumstances has this been the case, and the only reason it was checked at the last service was because it was already coming off and I asked for it to be resolved. After a discussion, they had a second Genius look at it, who replaced the scissor lift under the cap and suggested I take it home and test it further.

They're friendly enough, but their customer service is positively awful. I'm typing this now from the still-defective machine.



So, If anyone wants to throw me a few phone numbers or contacts from here, I'd greatly appreciate it. I'm also considering sending an email up to Tim Cook if anyone here feels this is a suitable option. Consumer affairs / fair trading / whatever it's referred to as may be required but I'm having a little difficulty judging when would be an appropriate time to call them in on this.

Advise me here, folks. I'm not sure what steps I should take next.



On a side-note, the outcome of this will determine whether I buy an Apple product in the future, I'm afraid. I've been an Apple Technician, an advocate for the brand, a Vintage Mac collector, a restorer and a consumer of used second-hand machines... but owning a brand new one has been the most sour experience I've ever had with a product, period. It's such a shame. I really, really wanted to love this product experience. Even if it does get repaired, I may consider selling it and investing some cash in my also-to-be-repaired Quad i7 MacBook Pro as since it cost me very little, I won't have as many hold ups about whatever imperfections it may have.

glacierdave
22nd June 2013, 09:18 PM
Sorry to hear of your on-going issues. It's frustrating when things aren't going right.

Unfortunately, no matter how good a product line is generally, that doesn't mean nothing will go wrong or that there won't be that one unit that just never works properly. It's the difference between averages and actual.

I think your best chance of a good result is to document everything you can (as much as possible in writing) and have that ready. Then ring AppleCare and explain your dissatisfaction. When that gets you nowhere (and that's likely to be the case) ask to speak to a supervisor. Rinse and repeat until you get to a level where you feel they have the discretion to actually offer you a resolution you can live with.

At that point, offer to email your written explanation of everything to that person. Get their name, a direct method of contact and their email address and ASK THEM when you can call them back to follow up on what you'll send them.

Try and be reasonable but firm.

You have the right to a computer that works properly.

The term you may need to quote them is "no fit for the purpose intended" - this is one of those phrases that has legal meaning in terms of consumer protection. Once you hit the appropriate staff level, they'll be acutely aware of their potential liability to this and are more likely to be willing to reach some agreement with you.

In terms of the result, have clear in your own mind what you want. Be prepared to ask for what you want and justify why you believe it's reasonable. The other term that can help you here is "not of merchantable quality". Again, it has legal meaning in terms of consumer protection.

Without getting nasty, it may also help to suggest that if an equitable result can't be reached you'll have to take it to your state consumer affairs body - that body can apply pressure to get you a result.

David

Oldmacs
22nd June 2013, 09:46 PM
I agree!!!!

I'm surprised they didn't blame it on the RAM (Despite the fact that you can't touch the ram on a MBA)

My Macbook Pro has been to Apple 5 times now with problems ranging from Kernal panics, poor battery life and complete failure to boot for 3 days. This week I actually started getting the service battery icon. Sure enough I am no longer getting it all the time. I took screenshots but I doubt that they will accept it. I am scared senseless of having the Mac completely die again as I NEED it for year 12. Apple care is a complete waste of money when apple are useless with this sort of stuff.

I'm the same. I bought the Macbook and WANTED to love it but honestly not being able to trust it is an issue. Apple have not ever been helpful and constantly blamed me, and have lied to me.

(And this comes from an Apple Lover)

iMic
23rd June 2013, 04:45 AM
The case has been assessed by an AppleCare Senior Advisor, but there's no progress being made. Monday is the very last attempt for Apple's regular service channels to make this right, Customer Relations is being called in on this one but if they continue to refuse to budge on this one, I'll have to take this well above them.

I'm supposed to email this documentation to the AppleCare advisor, but after confirming my email address three times with two different advisors, I still have yet to receive the email that they advised me they would send.

Better yet, the email they were supposed to send was Apple's guidelines for conserving battery life. As if that makes a shred of difference when you have a recorded battery malfunction. Being a currently registered ACMT, I'm finding the information provided to me by AppleCare to be ridiculous, only because I know it's false. There are plenty of overrides within Apple to get issues resolved, and I've had to use them many times before. Being told that the Genius Bar decision is final, especially with the substantial evidence that there is in fact a battery malfunction (one of which is posted above in this very thread), is nothing less than a slap in the face.

If it doesn't get resolved, I'm considering sending a message to Tim Cook or contacting Consumer Affairs in South Australia. I very much doubt that Apple will move on this come Monday, so it's likely I will need to resort to such measures. Something I don't really have the time for at the moment, but they're leaving me little choice.



As for the battery, It's currently sitting at 80% health, about 0.2% above the "Battery Bad" threshold and the depletion rate is incredible. The machine has been cleanly restarted, with nothing more than this one tab in Safari open so I can type this response, and I'm getting an estimate of about 4 hours at the very best - a far cry from the Apple estimated 7 hours. 20 minutes of use and I've lost 10% of its battery charge, with the estimated time remaining falling by an entire hour. Current open applications are Safari (MacTalk Tab) and coconutBattery to observe the percentages as I need to rapidly screenshot it should it fall below 80%. The frustration is killing me here.


When this is finally resolved, there's a good chance the machine will end up on the used market. I think 12 months of enduring the headaches of this machine is more than enough.

dekco
23rd June 2013, 11:05 AM
sending a message to tim cook is going to be a waste of time. what you should be dealing with is consumer affairs, and if that fails, maybe a small claims case via the magistrate.

Byrd
23rd June 2013, 11:23 AM
iMac600, I don't understand - you were an Apple Hardware Tech, surely you can get the issues addressed with a lot more clout than us normal thugs?

iMic
23rd June 2013, 11:33 AM
I wish that were the case, Byrd. At the end of the day though, I'm just another customer. I don't work within Apple, and I've never been employed by Apple, just a service provider. Although I was an Apple certified technician, it only allowed me to work on the machines, not to hold any leverage within AppleCare. They authorised and ordered everything I was able to do - the certification just allowed me to accept those orders and be held accountable for their outcomes. At the end of the day, I still have to follow the exact same channels as everybody else, pitfalls and all.

I've always been of the impression anyway that us regular customers and users are a more valuable resource for information anyway. Someone that understands their consumer rights will have more clout than a former technician, because while I may know the terminology and understand internal procedures, the informed consumer is the one armed with the information and force needed to put those procedures into action.



dekco, Thanks for the advice. I'll keep it in mind. With a little luck it won't even need to be carried that far, perhaps I can discuss it with Customer Relations and get someone that understands the issue and why it needs to be addressed. In the event that it does require matters to be taken further though, I'll keep all of this in mind.

leon
23rd June 2013, 12:29 PM
sending a message to tim cook is going to be a waste of time. what you should be dealing with is consumer affairs, and if that fails, maybe a small claims case via the magistrate.

I emailed Steve Jobs about issues with my Mac Pro in early 2010. Received a call from Apple within 24 hours, sent some logs to the engineers in the USA after they had me run a diagnostic they emailed me, then within a week they had a tech come out and install a hardware fix. This route can work.

Buthidae
23rd June 2013, 02:47 PM
iMac600, I don't understand - you were an Apple Hardware Tech, surely you can get the issues addressed with a lot more clout than us normal thugs?
Even working for Apple doesn't get you extra clout - if anything, you get less, as the company has a responsibility to treat all customers as fairly as possible.

iMac600, as frustrating as your process sounds, I think you're on the right track. Now that it's going towards the Customer Relations stage, you should hopefully get more of a sympathetic ear towards a replacement machine. They generally need to satisfy requirements that there have been repeated unsuccessful repairs. As I'm sure you know, replacing the Top Case, Logic Board, and Battery doesn't leave much of the original machine, so I'd strongly recommend letting them try that first. I'm sure you rather wouldn't, but I can guarantee you (speaking from experience on both sides of the fence) that if the machine continues to exhibit issues you will be much closer to a CRU (Customer Replacement Unit) than if they hadn't.

My Late-2008 MacBook Pro had started to exhibit a variety of issues towards the end of its AppleCare period. After an admittedly irritating month or so, in which a handful of major repairs were performed, AppleCare / Customer Relations then agreed to replace the unit, and I walked out with a brand-new in box Mid-2011 MacBook Pro. YMMV, but I was happy enough to be offered a new machine that I even negotiated to pay a bit extra and customise it with more RAM, a higher-spec CPU, and the HD display.

If CR have been onboard and you still feel like you're not getting anywhere, I'd definitely email Tim Cook and open up a discussion. Be concise and clear - bullet points are good. He reads his own email and will forward any exceptional cases like these to be handled by Exec.

Oldmacs: Please note this is meant with all friendliness, but my best advice is minimise your in-store smoke blowing. :):) Some of them are too young (I know you're young yourself, though I don't think people would pick it if they hadn't seen you mention it! ;)) to 'get' the older machines, and others have heard it all too many times. Don't take that as discouragement - if you ask them "Hey, do you have much older Apple kit?" and they respond favourably definitely chew their ear off (e.g. if you were unlucky enough to be talking to me I'd never shut up!) but you don't want to come off as showboating. Rightly or wrongly, if they're not interested then it won't have the 'loyalty effect' that you're after :)

iMic
23rd June 2013, 03:51 PM
Even working for Apple doesn't get you extra clout - if anything, you get less, as the company has a responsibility to treat all customers as fairly as possible.

Spot on. I have an incredibly difficult time getting repairs past Apple, sometimes regardless of warranty status.


iMac600, as frustrating as your process sounds, I think you're on the right track. Now that it's going towards the Customer Relations stage, you should hopefully get more of a sympathetic ear towards a replacement machine. They generally need to satisfy requirements that there have been repeated unsuccessful repairs. As I'm sure you know, replacing the Top Case, Logic Board, and Battery doesn't leave much of the original machine, so I'd strongly recommend letting them try that first. I'm sure you rather wouldn't, but I can guarantee you (speaking from experience on both sides of the fence) that if the machine continues to exhibit issues you will be much closer to a CRU (Customer Replacement Unit) than if they hadn't.

As it stands, only the battery will be getting replaced. The Genius Bar replaced the scissor lift under the defective key, but retained the factory fitted key cap. It hasn't come off since then, but I'm still in the process of testing it.

What I don't understand is the fact they weren't willing to pursue the battery issue further. I never had problems processing customers machines for battery replacements as long as it would either fail the AST diagnostic, or if it didn't, the customer could supply proof of the issue in the form of a screenshot showing the "Service Battery" indicator as being present. While I had hoped the images and documentation I supplied was sufficient at the Genius Bar, they turned it down, and as a result the AppleCare Senior Advisors are now also turning down the repair based on the notes left following the Genius Bar appointment.

Hopefully Customer Relations can correct it, although I'm not expecting much more than a patch job repair to see it to the end of the Limited Warranty. Considering the machine has been a challenge to use over the last 11 months, I'll be sure to raise this with the Customer Relations agent.



As of this afternoon, the battery is still hovering between 80% and 81%. It quite literally needs to fall to 79.9% to throw a service battery error. Battery life is awful. I've charged it up and fully discharged it twice today already.

Oldmacs
23rd June 2013, 06:33 PM
Even working for Apple doesn't get you extra clout - if anything, you get less, as the company has a responsibility to treat all customers as fairly as possible.

iMac600, as frustrating as your process sounds, I think you're on the right track. Now that it's going towards the Customer Relations stage, you should hopefully get more of a sympathetic ear towards a replacement machine. They generally need to satisfy requirements that there have been repeated unsuccessful repairs. As I'm sure you know, replacing the Top Case, Logic Board, and Battery doesn't leave much of the original machine, so I'd strongly recommend letting them try that first. I'm sure you rather wouldn't, but I can guarantee you (speaking from experience on both sides of the fence) that if the machine continues to exhibit issues you will be much closer to a CRU (Customer Replacement Unit) than if they hadn't.

My Late-2008 MacBook Pro had started to exhibit a variety of issues towards the end of its AppleCare period. After an admittedly irritating month or so, in which a handful of major repairs were performed, AppleCare / Customer Relations then agreed to replace the unit, and I walked out with a brand-new in box Mid-2011 MacBook Pro. YMMV, but I was happy enough to be offered a new machine that I even negotiated to pay a bit extra and customise it with more RAM, a higher-spec CPU, and the HD display.

If CR have been onboard and you still feel like you're not getting anywhere, I'd definitely email Tim Cook and open up a discussion. Be concise and clear - bullet points are good. He reads his own email and will forward any exceptional cases like these to be handled by Exec.

Oldmacs: Please note this is meant with all friendliness, but my best advice is minimise your in-store smoke blowing. :):) Some of them are too young (I know you're young yourself, though I don't think people would pick it if they hadn't seen you mention it! ;)) to 'get' the older machines, and others have heard it all too many times. Don't take that as discouragement - if you ask them "Hey, do you have much older Apple kit?" and they respond favourably definitely chew their ear off (e.g. if you were unlucky enough to be talking to me I'd never shut up!) but you don't want to come off as showboating. Rightly or wrongly, if they're not interested then it won't have the 'loyalty effect' that you're after :)

Don't worry!! I only mention the vintage Macs as I always get asked about what Apple products I have so I mention I have a collection of Vintage Macs. Twice now I have chatted to geniuses ( the nice ones) that have an Apple collection as well. One of the others was telling me about her friends vintage Mac collection. I know they don't care about customer loyalty but I just think its nice to have a little chat to ease my anger :P :P


PS I love your IT crowd reference :D

dekco
23rd June 2013, 09:36 PM
I emailed Steve Jobs about issues with my Mac Pro in early 2010. Received a call from Apple within 24 hours, sent some logs to the engineers in the USA after they had me run a diagnostic they emailed me, then within a week they had a tech come out and install a hardware fix. This route can work.

so did i. never got a response. that is why i wouldnt put too much hope on it.

Oldmacs
23rd June 2013, 10:18 PM
I've tried the Tim Cook email twice and it hasn't resulted in anything :(

iMic
24th June 2013, 12:09 PM
Apple Customer Relations has authorised the replacement of the battery.

It's not the absolute best outcome, but it'll return the machine to a fully functional state.

Now to see if the Apple Store upholds their end of the deal.